Kiki Sugino

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Kiki Sugino
Sugino Saki from "Snow Woman" at Opening Ceremony of the Tokyo International Film Festival 2016 (33487954352) (cropped).jpg
Sugino in 2016 at the premiere of Snow Woman
Born (1984-03-12) March 12, 1984 (age 34)
Hiroshima, Japan
Occupation Actor
Producer
Film director
Screenwriter

Kiki Sugino (杉野希妃, Sugino Kiki) is a Japanese actor, writer, producer and film director. She has produced over ten films and acted in such movies as Hospitalité, Chigasaki Story and Snow Woman. In 2014 she directed the film Yokudō which later went on to win awards at the Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival and the Hong Kong Asian Film Festival.[1]

Biography[edit]

Sugino was born in Hiroshima in 1984 to a family of Korean descent. She studied Economics at Keio University and traveled to South Korea as an exchange student where she appeared in her first film One Shining Day.[1] In 2010 Sugino worked with Japanese director Koji Fukada to produce and act in the comedy film Hospitalité which won an award at the Tokyo International Film Festival and was screened at nearly 100 film festivals internationally.[2]

Sugino made her directorial debut in 2014 with the comedy film Kyoto Elegy which was shot in just eleven days and premiered at the Tokyo International Film Festival to positive reviews.[3] Two years later she directed the film Snow Woman, a retelling of the Japanese folklore tale Yuki-onna.[4]

Filmography[edit]

As director[edit]

Year Title Ref.
2014 Yokudō [5]
2014 Short Plays [6]
2014 Kyoto Elegy [5]
2016 Snow Woman [5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bourne, Christopher (5 June 2012). "Crossing Borders: A Conversation with Actress and Producer Kiki Sugino, of MAGIC AND LOSS". Screen Anarchy. Retrieved 9 November 2017. 
  2. ^ Schilling, Mark (16 December 2015). "Kiki Sugino: 'I'm always looking for myself'". The Japan Times. Retrieved 9 November 2017. 
  3. ^ Collin, Robbie (2 November 2014). "Kyoto Elegy, Tokyo Film Festival, review: 'makes small scenes enormous'". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 9 November 2017. 
  4. ^ Young, Deborah (11 May 2016). "Korean-Japanese actress and director Kiki Sugino taps Japanese folklore in a timeless ghost story". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 9 November 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c "Film". kikisugino.com. Retrieved 9 November 2017. 
  6. ^ Hopewell, John (24 March 2014). "Weerasethakul, Reygadas, Noe, Gallo, Dorrie Link for 'Short Cuts'". Variety. Retrieved 9 November 2017. 

External links[edit]