Kill Squad

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Kill Squad
Kill Squad poster.jpg
Promotional release poster
Directed byPatrick G. Donahue
Written byPatrick G. Donahue
StarringJean Glaudé
Cameron Mitchell
Music byJoseph Conlan
CinematographyChristopher W. Strattan
Release date
  • 1982 (1982)
LanguageEnglish

Kill Squad is a 1982 American martial arts action film written and directed by Patrick G. Donahue and starring Jean Glaudé and Cameron Mitchell.[1][2][3]

Plot[edit]

Joseph Lawrence, a Vietnam War veteran and current electronics owner, has become the victim of an attack that results in him being incapacitated and in a wheelchair and his wife killed. Joseph may know who is responsible for the attack and asks his best friend and fellow vet Larry Pearson to assemble the "squad". A flashback reveals Joseph, Larry, along with Pete, K.C., Alan, and Arthur as prisoners of war for the Viet Cong. The Viet Cong force Joseph to walk through a mine field while Alan, the strongest of the group, breaks free and leads an attack on the Viet Cong after Joseph accidentally steps on a land mine. Taking out the Viet Cong, Larry and the guys grab Joseph and return home.

Larry finds Alan, who beats up a group of fellow poker players after they accuse him of cheating, which he admits to Larry that he did. The duo find K.C., who has become a pimp who learns two of his hookers have been kicked out of their local corner by a rival pimp. After K.C. beats the rival and his two enforcers, Larry and Alan inform K.C. that Joseph needs them. Together, they find Tommy, who works as a gardener for a local rich man who has stiffed him, forcing him to beat him and some local partygoers up. Larry finds Arthur, who has become a con man who swindles investors out of money by coming up with a pet bug project.

After they assemble and show their skills, Larry informs the team that a rival electronics company owner by the name of Dutch may be responsible for the attack on Joseph. Their only lead is a man named Virgil, a cowboy type at a local ranch. Larry and K.C. head to find Virgil and they get another lead. As the team gets more leads, it results in the team splitting up and fighting their way to get more leads. However, a mysterious sniper appears and begins to gun down both the leads and members of the team. First Alan is killed, then Pete, then K.C., and then Tommy. When Larry and Arthur finally catch up to Dutch, Dutch swears he is partly responsible but is not the only one involved. Arthur is gunned down, leaving Larry the only remaining member.

Upon returning to Joseph's house, the mysterious masked sniper appears but so does Arthur, who was wearing a bulletproof vest. However, the sniper uses a sword and slashes Arthur. As Larry takes on the sniper, the horrible truth is revealed. Joseph was the mastermind of his own attack. He did it because the landmine accident caused him to lose his feet and that his wife was constantly rejecting him and he finally revealed that she owned everything. He worked with Dutch to make the attack because he wanted everything for himself and trained himself over the years to seek revenge on the squad for what happened in Vietnam. Larry, upset, finally realizes he must stop Joseph. Joseph uses an axe and misses causing it to stick to the fence. Larry evades an attack and gives Joseph a side kick, decapitating him on the axe. As Larry goes to check on Arthur, Arthur is revealed to be still alive and the two walk off with Arthur attempting his scam on Larry.

Cast[edit]

  • Cameron Mitchell as Dutch
  • Jean Glaudé as Larry Pearson
  • Jeff Risk as Joseph Lawrence
  • Jerry Johnson as K.C.
  • Francisco Ramírez as Pete
  • Bill Cambra as Alan
  • Gary Fung as Tommy
  • Marc Sabin as Arthur
  • Alan Marcus as Jessie James
  • Sean P. Donahue as Billy

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nash, Jay Robert; Ross, Stanley Ralph. The Motion picture guide. CineBooks, 1985. p. 1523.
  2. ^ Cohn, Lawrence L. "Review: Kill Squad". Variety (335). June 9, 1982. p. 16.
  3. ^ "Kill Squad". The Hollywood Reporter (272/17). June 17, 1982. p. 4.

External links[edit]