Killman Zoo

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Killman Zoo
Date opened April 1, 1988 (1988-04-01)
Location 237 Unity Road East, Caledonia, Haldimand County, Ontario, Canada
Land area 33 acres (130,000 m2)
Number of species 25
Owner Mark and Rhonda Killman

Killman Zoo is located approximately 4 kilometres or 2.5 miles north of Caledonia in Haldimand County, Ontario, Canada. It was opened on April 1, 1988, as a natural progression of the Killman's Wildlife Sanctuary.

Summary[edit]

This rural zoo is located 2 kilometres or 1.2 miles east of Highway 6 at 237 Unity Road East. It is a privately owned and operated zoo using 9 acres (36,000 m2) of trails on a property spanning 33 acres (130,000 m2). There are gift shops and picnic facilities; which allow guests to eat pre-packaged food at the zoo. Tamer animals like dwarf goats and baboons can be petted by people of all ages at the special petting zoo portion of the attraction. People with wheelchairs are able to access the sights with wheelchair-accessible trails.

The Killman family that operates the zoo are descended from the Seneca, Onandaga and Mohawk Tribes of the Canadian First Nations. An adult ticket costs nearly $15 plus HST while a child's ticket costs around $8 plus HST. The zoo is an ongoing project and expansion is commonly taking place

Controversy[edit]

The Killman Zoo has long been criticized by respected animal protection organizations such as the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA). Is there such a thing as "natural progression" from animal sanctuary and refuge to a roadside tourist attraction? Photographs taken by visitors detail barren conditions and small, questionably built enclosures. The lives of the animals appear devoid of mental stimulation and proper physical exercise.

In Ontario it is legal for anyone to breed, buy and sell an exotic animal. WSPA says that "Ontario remains the only province yet to licence the keeping of exotic wildlife. This means that anyone regardless of experience, expertise or financing can start a zoo or keep a tiger, lion or venomous snake as a pet." ZOOCHECK Canada detailed the plight of the animals at the Killman Zoo in 2008 in a comprehensive review which included the following:

"Most cages are completely barren of species-specific cage furnishings, and offer only wooden resting platforms and, often inappropriately sized, decaying wooden dens. Most of the animals do not have adequate pools for bathing. For the most part, the animals appeared lethargic, many were obese and lacked good muscle tone. At least six cats were observed to be actively engaged in stereotypies, pacing for the duration of the inspection. Pacing pathways inside the cages are evidence of problematic pacing issues."

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°06′09″N 79°54′51″W / 43.1025°N 79.9143°W / 43.1025; -79.9143