Kim Myong-chol

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Kim Myong-chol (김명철, born 1944[1]) is a Korean writer and editor based in Japan and an unofficial spokesperson of North Korea,[2] regularly travelling to Pyongyang and around the world portraying the North Korean leadership and politics. He was a close associate of Kim Jong-il.[3] His articles have appeared in many publications, including Asia Times and Asia Research. Among the several books that he has written is Kim Jong-il — Military Strategy for Reunification.[4] His books have been banned in South Korea.[5] Currently, he is the Executive Director of CFKAP (Center for Korean-American Peace), based in Tokyo, Japan. He holds North Korean nationality and a North Korean Diplomatic Passport.[6]

He has claimed variously that "North Korea has all types of nuclear bombs and warheads, atomic, hydrogen and neutron, and the means of delivery, short-range, medium-range and long-range, putting the whole of the continental US within effective range" and that "[u]nlike all the previous wars Korea fought, a next war will be better called the American War or the DPRK-US War because the main theater will be the continental US, with major cities transformed into towering infernos."[7] Additionally, he has threatened Australia with similar results, stating "[i]f Australia becomes part of American manipulation against North Korea, North Korea reserve the right to strike back on Australia".[8]

Works[edit]

  • Kim Myong-chol (2001). Kim Jong Il: Day of having Korea reunified: North Korean scenario for war and peace (PDF). Pyongyang: Foreign Languages Publishing House. OCLC 276274813.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "9770413". viaf.org. Retrieved 23 March 2019.
  2. ^ Interdicting will cause nuclear strike: N Korea 'spokesman'
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-01-19. Retrieved 2009-04-13.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Kim Jong II's military strategy for reunification. The changing demographics of the US southern security perimeter: A first look at the numbers".
  5. ^ "Archived copy". www.asianresearch.org. Archived from the original on 2004-04-26.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ "Home".
  7. ^ Asia Times
  8. ^ "Target Australia? Tell him he's dreaming". 15 July 2003.

External links[edit]