Kim Wexler

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Kim Wexler
Better Call Saul character
KimWexlerBCS.jpg
Rhea Seahorn as Kim Wexler
First appearance"Uno" (2015)
Created by
Portrayed byRhea Seehorn
Information
Full nameKimberly Wexler
AliasGiselle Saint Claire
Occupation
  • HHM Litigator
  • Attorney
  • Partner at Wexler McGill
Significant otherJimmy McGill

Kimberly Wexler is a fictional character from the AMC television series Better Call Saul, a spin-off of Breaking Bad. Kim is portrayed by Rhea Seehorn, and was created by Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould.[1] She is a lawyer, and is also the love interest of titular character Jimmy McGill.

Character biography[edit]

Background[edit]

As given during various flashbacks on the show, Kim Wexler was born and raised at the Kansas-Nebraska-border. She left her hometown and moved to Albuquerque, because of the few opportunities she had in her hometown. While attending law school, she became an intern in Hamlin, Hamlin, and McGill (HHM), where both Howard Hamlin and Chuck McGill are lead partners. She worked the mailroom alongside Chuck's younger brother Jimmy, working a legitimate job to rid himself of his con artist past. With HHM footing Kim's law degree, she succeeded in graduating and subsequently joined HHM, becoming one of their top prosecuting lawyers. Kim's success also inspired Jimmy to get a law degree, though from a far less reputable institution, forcing him to run his own practice.

Season 1[edit]

In the show's present, Jimmy, angered by how Chuck and HHM has treated him, has additional run-ins with HHM, apparently stealing a case out from the firm and ripping off the firm's logo and marketing. Kim, under Howard's direction, tries to get Jimmy to stop, but finds Jimmy's use of con games interesting; Jimmy, in turn, suggests that she should leave HHM and set up a firm with him. Fallout from Jimmy's actions cause Kim to lose some of her reputation within HHM. Kim becomes more disenchanted with HHM after Jimmy brings HHM a potentially multi-million dollar class-action lawsuit from the Sandpiper retirement community that he stumbled upon himself, only for Chuck to refuse to allow Jimmy to participate on case. However, when the case grows in size, HHM calls on services of another firm, Davis & Main, and Kim recommends that they take on Jimmy due to his familiarity with the case.

Season 2[edit]

Jimmy is extremely reluctant to take the job at Davis & Main, hiding away among the luxuries of a posh hotel. Kim tracks him down and tries to convince him to take the job. Instead, Jimmy brings her in on a con, convincing another hotel patron to pay for an expensive bottle of tequila. The con is a success, and the two sleep together that night; Kim keeps the bottle stopper as a memento.

Jimmy accepts the Davis & Main job and works with Kim on the lawsuit. Jimmy makes a major legal blunder by soliciting members for the class-action directly and then prepares a television advertisement to get more class members without getting the approval of his superiors. Kim bears the brunt of this at HHM as she covers for Jimmy, staining her reputation there further. Jimmy tries to quit Davis & Main in hopes this helps restore's Kim's reputation there, but Kim insists she needs to work her own reputation back and keeps her distance from Jimmy. She succeeds, by way of her contacts, in convincing a large regional bank, Mesa Verde, to enlist HHM's legal services as they expand, but even with this wealthy client, Howard refuses to acknowledge Kim's contributions. In a lingering case, Kim's courtroom proficiency draws the attention of Richard Schweikart, a partner at the firm Schweikart and Cokely. Schweikart tells Kim that HHM is doing her a disservice and offers her a partner position in his firm. Kim mulls on the idea, and while drinking at a bar, gets to talking to a man that she recognizes as a potential con target. She calls Jimmy to bring him over, and the two successfully complete another con and spent the night together. Kim decides to leave HHM and establish her own solo practice, co-located in a former dentist's office alongside Jimmy's. Knowing that Kim wants Mesa Verde as her client, Jimmy tampers with important documents in Chuck's possession to create inconsistencies prior to the next state board approval meeting. Mesa Verde drops HHM and signs on with Kim, but Kim learns of Jimmy's involvement in the matter and tells him to cover his tracks.

Season 3[edit]

Chuck becomes increasingly paranoid of Jimmy's actions and eventually secures Jimmy's statement on tape that he tampered with the files. Chuck has Jimmy taken to a review board, and while the board does disbar Jimmy for practicing law for one year, the trial exposes that Chuck's apparent electromagnetic hypersensitivity appears to be only psychosomatic, thanks to information Kim had learned and relayed to Jimmy. Chuck's case ruins his reputation within HHM. As Jimmy is unable to secure any cases, Kim is forced to work hard to be able to pay for their office, including taking on a second client, Gatwood Oil. Rushing late to a meeting but running on little sleep, she crashes her car and breaks her arm. She uses this as a excuse to have Jimmy break their lease so that she can run her practice out of her apartment, with Jimmy staying with her to help her manage her life with her arm in the cast.

Season 4[edit]

Following Chuck's suicide, Kim tries to help Jimmy break out of his despondent mood, and accosts Howard, who blames himself for Chuck's death, for his terrible treatment of Jimmy. Kim finds that Mesa Verde has much broader visions for expansion, which would significantly affect her own work, and she starts looking back towards public defense, ending up taking pro bono cases. After she is reprimanded by Paige for putting her pro bono work above theirs, Kim goes back to Schweikart and asks about the partnership position again. She is made a partner at Schweikart and Cokely, creating a banking law division there to help handle her corporate clients and giving her more time to public defense. With her career becoming more successful, she becomes more distant from Jimmy, who has ended up taking a boring job at a cell phone store while selling pay-as-you-go phones on the side waiting out his prohibiton year. Near the end of this year, Jimmy's associate Huell has a run-in with a plainclothes, and Jimmy convinces Kim to try to help him avoid jail time. Finding it nearly impossible to convince the prosecuting attorney to reduce the sentences, Kim falls back on Jimmy's con tricks to arrange for an elaborate show of support for Huell. When this proves successful, Kim and Jimmy sleep together again, and Kim expresses interest in keeping up these con games.

Reception[edit]

Rhea Seehorn portrays Kim Wexler.

Due to Kim Wexler's popularity in Better Call Saul, creator Vince Gilligan hinted at a possible spin-off about her, he also said that a Wexler-spin-off is the most likely to do, saying, "If we were to do another spin-off it would be the Kim Wexler show.[1]

Salon commented on Kim Wexler's role in the fourth season:

But that is precisely why Kim has become the low-key heroine of season 4. With her signature ponytail, her sensible bargain-rack suit separates and heels that are low enough to polish her look but high enough to suggest a whiff of danger, Kim is a stand-in for every cubicle dweller who takes pride in working hard and doing a job well but at some point realizes that it’s not doing enough.[2]

For her performances in season 1 and season 2, Rhea Seehorn won a Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film in 2015 and 2016.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Quinn, Karl (15 July 2017). "Breaking Bad's Vince Gilligan reveals most likely spin-off from Better Call Saul". The Sydney Morning Herald.
  2. ^ https://www.salon.com/2018/09/02/we-are-all-kim-wexler-better-call-saul-and-the-painful-realities-of-mid-career-crisis/
  3. ^ IntlPressAcademy (23 February 2016). "Rhea Seehorn wins Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress" – via YouTube.
  4. ^ "2015 International Press Academy". www.pressacademy.com. Retrieved 2018-03-18.

External links[edit]