Kimenzan Tanigorō

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Kimenzan Tanigorō
鬼面山 谷五郎
Shiranui and Kimenzan 2.jpg
Shiranui (left) and Kimenzan (right) in 1869
Personal information
Born Shin'ichi Tanaka
1826
Gifu, Japan
Died September 7, 1871(1871-09-07) (aged 45)
Height 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)
Weight 140 kg (310 lb)
Career
Stable Takekuma
Record 143-24-63
16draws-8holds(Makuuchi)
Debut February 1852
Highest rank Yokozuna (April 1869)
Retired November, 1870
Championships 7 (Makuuchi, unofficial)
* Up to date as of October 2007.

Kimenzan Tanigorō (鬼面山 谷五郎, 1826? – September 7, 1871) was a sumo wrestler. He was the sport's 13th yokozuna.

Career[edit]

Kimenzan was born in Yoro, Gifu Prefecture, Japan and his real name was Shin'ichi Tanaka. He entered sumo in February 1852 in the second highest jūryō division and reached the top makuuchi division in January 1857. He was employed by the Tokushima Domain.

He was promoted to ōzeki in November 1865. However, he was unenrolled in the November 1866 banzuke. It was reportedly because he had a quarrel with sumo elders.[1] He was promoted to ōzeki again in June 1868.

He was awarded a yokozuna license in February 1869. He became a yokozuna at the age of 43, the oldest ever.[2]

In the top makuuchi division, he won 143 bouts and lost 24 bouts, recording a winning percentage of 85.6.

He retired as an active wrestler in November 1870, but died in the next year. His grave can be found in Sayama, Saitama.

There is a monument to him in Yōrō, Gifu.[3]

Top division record[edit]

  • The actual time the tournaments were held during the year in this period often varied.
Kimenzan Tanigorō[4]
- Spring Winter
1857 East Maegashira #7
8–0–2
 
East Maegashira #4
6–2–2
 
1858 East Maegashira #2
8–0–2
Unofficial

 
Called off due to fire
1859 East Komusubi
8–0–1
1h
Unofficial

 
East Komusubi
6–2–2
 
1860 East Komusubi
8–1–1
 
East Komusubi
6–0–1
Unofficial

 
1861 East Komusubi
3–1–5
1h

 
East Komusubi
6–1–3
 
1862 East Komusubi
6–1–2
1d

 
East Sekiwake
6–3–1
 
1863 East Sekiwake
7–0–1
1d 1h
Unofficial

 
East Sekiwake
7–0–2
2d
Unofficial

 
1864 East Sekiwake
5–0–3
2d

 
East Sekiwake
5–3–2
 
1865 East Sekiwake
5–2–2
1h

 
East Ōzeki
4–0–3
3d 1h

 
1866 East Ōzeki
7–0–1
1d 1h
Unofficial

 
Not enrolled
1867 East Komusubi
5–0–1
3d 1h

 
East Komusubi
4–0–5
1d

 
1868 West Ōzeki
1–2–6
1h

 
West Ōzeki
9–0–1
Unofficial

 
1869 West Ōzeki
7–2–1
 
West Ōzeki
6–0–2
2d

 
1870 West Ōzeki
4–1–5
 
West Ōzeki
Retired
0–0–10
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Key:   d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り);   nr=no result recorded
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: 
Yokozuna (not ranked as such on banzuke until 1890)
ŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

*Championships for the best record in a tournament were not recognized or awarded before the 1909 summer tournament and the above unofficial championships are historically conferred. For more information see yūshō.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 横綱の歴史 (in Japanese). History Research Council in Kyoto University. 1997-12-05. Retrieved 2008-07-03. 
  2. ^ Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. ISBN 0-8348-0283-X. 
  3. ^ 句歌碑めぐり (in Japanese). Yoro-cho Tourist sightseeing association. Retrieved 2008-05-28. 
  4. ^ "Kimenzan Tanigoro Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2007-09-27. 

External links[edit]

Previous:
Jinmaku Kyūgorō
13th Yokozuna
1869 - 1870
Next:
Sakaigawa Namiemon
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title