King's Hand

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

King's Hand
Image of the original King's Hand dish
Image of the original King's Hand dish, created by Twitter user @thatfrood
CourseMain course
Place of originUnited States
Main ingredientsGreek salad, cookie dough, and M&M's

King's Hand is a dessert made of M&M's and cookie dough, molded into the shape of a hollow hand and filled with Greek salad. It was invented by Twitter user @thatfrood, a 28-year-old data analyst, who says the idea for the dish came to him in a dream in which it was the main course of a festival feast.[1] After a week of experimentation, he posted a series of photos on Twitter on December 6, 2020. Later that day, he shared his recipe. As of December 15, 2020, the tweet had garnered over 166,000 likes and was featured in a diverse array of media and print publications, including Fox News,[2] TODAY,[3] Yahoo! News,[4] and BuzzFeed News.[1] The original post inspired people to make their own versions, as well as descriptions of foods that had appeared in others' dreams.[5]

Background[edit]

Arseny, who prefers to be referred to by his first name,[6] told Buzzfeed News that he remembered only a little of the dream in which King's Hand was revealed to him, saying, "I wish I remembered more about the King's Hand dream other than King's Hand, [but that's] kind of the nature of it, right?... Normally you don't remember a dream."[1] However, he does recall that it was the main course of a festival feast.

Immediately after waking, Arseny wrote down the ingredients in a group chat so as not to forget the recipe.[1]

Arseny discussed the process on Twitter. "First, you will need to make a mold of a hand. For this, I used food-grade silicone putty safe up to 400 deg. I ordered it online. It takes an hour to go solid."[7] He used the putty to make a cast of his own hand, placing M&Ms into the knuckles and fingernails of the cast before adding cookie dough and baking the result.[8] He then made a Greek salad, filling the hollow inside of the hand to complete the meal.

Arseny was surprised to find his post rapidly become popular. “I'm just constantly watching the thing refresh and seeing what everybody says. Some things are very mean. I think people need to think about the fact that I do see these,” he said. He added that he laughed at the majority of the comments.[9]

On December 16, 2020, Arseny created a modified version of the Hand using falafel instead of cookie dough.[10] This was subsequently referred to as "Shepherd's Hand".

Popularity and cultural influence[edit]

The viral tweet led many others to share their own dream-inspired foods. These included "Earl Gray hot cocoa," a mixture of hot chocolate and Earl Gray tea;[2][3] an unnamed curry that was held aloft above a fire in a muslin bag and was smoked, served with brown rice and a purple cocktail drink;[11] as well as "chamomile coffee," made by pouring coffee (rather than water) over chamomile tea bags.[3] Another user offered “cucumber cookies,” described as "batter-dipped cucumber slices, fried, coated in cinnamon sugar & then sandwiched together with an apple pie filling & drizzled with caramel."[11]

King's Hand was compared to "The Sinner's Sandwich" from the video game Deadly Premonition.[12] According to Yahoo! News, Twitter user @gracieelectric created a modified version of King's Hand without using a mold, dubbing it "King's Handwich".[4] On December 28, 2020, Fox News proclaimed King's Hand to be one of the "strangest food combinations of 2020".[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Onibada, Ade (November 10, 2020). "This Man Had A Dream About A Completely Random Meal Called "King's Hand," So He Brought It To Life". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on December 17, 2020. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  2. ^ a b Deabler, Alexandra (December 7, 2020). "Man makes cookie, salad 'King's Hand' dish based on dream he had, goes viral". Fox News. Retrieved December 16, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ a b c Kubota, Samantha (December 7, 2020). "Man goes viral for baking hand-shaped cookie stuffed with salad that he saw in dream". TODAY.com. NBC Universal. Archived from the original on December 16, 2020. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  4. ^ a b Stone, Lillian (December 14, 2020). "All hail the King's Hand, Twitter's latest culinary shitpost". Yahoo News. Archived from the original on April 15, 2021. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  5. ^ Morillo, Alexis (December 7, 2020). "This Twitter User Made A Greek Salad-Stuffed Cookie They Saw In A Dream And Of Course It Went Viral". Delish. Archived from the original on December 13, 2020. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  6. ^ Ngo, Hope (December 9, 2020). "Twitter can't stop talking about this bizarre Greek salad and sugar cookie mashup". Mashed.com. Archived from the original on May 13, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  7. ^ Stone, Lillian (December 14, 2020). "All hail the King's Hand, Twitter's latest culinary shitpost". The Takeout. Archived from the original on December 14, 2020. Retrieved May 28, 2021.
  8. ^ Fry, Courtney (December 7, 2020). "Someone Dreamed About A Cursed Salad-Stuffed Cookie Hand, Then Spent A Week Making It". Pedestrian TV. Archived from the original on November 11, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  9. ^ Onibada, Ade (December 10, 2020). "This Man Had A Dream About A Completely Random Meal Called "King's Hand," So He Brought It To Life". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on December 17, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2021.
  10. ^ Leventry, Amber (December 22, 2020). "The Weirdest Things That People Have (Literally) Dreamed Up". Scary Mommy. Archived from the original on November 17, 2021. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  11. ^ a b Mochizuki, Koh (December 14, 2020). "Guy Brings To Life A Dish He Saw In A Dream Called A 'King's Hand'—And It's Certainly Something". Comic Sands. Archived from the original on January 18, 2021. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  12. ^ "Man dreams of bizarre cookie recipe, call's it 'King's hand'". The Indian Express. December 10, 2020. Archived from the original on December 17, 2020. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  13. ^ Deabler, Alexandra (December 28, 2020). "The strangest food combinations of 2020 | Fox News". Fox News. Archived from the original on December 30, 2020. Retrieved December 30, 2020.

External links[edit]