King Albert Hall (Portland State University)

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King Albert Hall
PSU-KNGA.jpg
King Albert Hall in 2014
King Albert Hall (Portland State University) is located in Portland State University OR
King Albert Hall (Portland State University)
Location relative to Portland State University campus
Former names King Albert Apartments
General information
Type Student housing
Architectural style Mediterranean Revival
Address 1809 Southwest 11th Avenue
Town or city Portland, Oregon
Coordinates 45°30′46″N 122°41′15″W / 45.512819°N 122.687366°W / 45.512819; -122.687366Coordinates: 45°30′46″N 122°41′15″W / 45.512819°N 122.687366°W / 45.512819; -122.687366
Opened February 1918
Cost $125,000
Landlord Portland State University
Design and construction
Architect I.A. Peters
Website
PDX.EDU

King Albert Hall is a 64-unit student residence hall at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon, in the United States. The four-story brick building includes studio apartments with kitchens, a student coffee shop, and laundry facilities.

History[edit]

King Albert Apartments opened in February 1918, on the southwest corner of 11th and Montgomery. The address was 385 11th Street but was changed to 1809 SW 11th Avenue according to the 1933 street renumbering system.[1] The name King Albert may have been chosen to honor World War I hero Albert I of Belgium. Owner Herbert Gordon, a real estate developer and member of the Oregon House of Representatives, sold the property soon after completion to A.C. Ruby, a breeder of thoroughbred horses.[2] At a cost of $125,000, the building contained 51 three-room apartments and 16 two-room apartments. Advertisements emphasized "strictly modern" units with hardwood floors, tile baths, dressing rooms, and elevator access.[3]

After the death of A.C. Ruby, ownership of the property passed to A.C. Ruby Jr., and in 1934 the building was part of a $250,000 title transfer whereby C.R. Reed, a breeder of thoroughbred horses, acquired the King Albert Apartments in exchange for the Davenport Farm in Silverton, Oregon. The farm had been the boyhood home of Homer Davenport.[4]

In 1969, the property became part of student housing at Portland State University.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Index to street numbering in the City of Portland". February 22, 1933. Retrieved January 8, 2014.
  2. ^ "Apartment House Sold", The Oregonian, p. 63, July 14, 1918
  3. ^ "Five-year lease closed", The Oregonian, p. 10, February 3, 1918
  4. ^ "Davenport Farm figures in deal", The Oregonian, p. 1, December 25, 1934

External links[edit]