King County Administration Building

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King Country Administration Building with hexagonal theme
Hexagon window openings

The nine-story King County Administration Building Seattle, the seat of King County, Washington, United States. It lies between Jefferson and James streets and between Fourth and Fifth avenues. It features a unique hexagaonal honeycomb theme in its walls and windows. It was built in 1971.[1]

Agencies[edit]

The King County Administration Building is located at 500 Fourth Ave. Parking is available in parking garages on all surrounding streets.

Several agencies are located in the Administration Building, including:

  • Archives and Records Management
  • Assessor's Office
  • Facilities Management
  • Marriage Licensing
  • Recorder's Office
  • Vehicle Licensing
  • Prosecuting Attorney
  • King County Sheriff's Office Criminal Investigation Division

Aesthetics[edit]

According to the Seattle Times, "County and city officials agree on at least one thing: the dubious aesthetics of the Administration Building, a squat, fortresslike building with diagonal lines". Seattle Deputy Mayor Tim Ceis stated "I think everybody acknowledges it may be the ugliest building in downtown Seattle."[citation needed]

It was also voted the ugliest government building in the country in the '70s, shortly after it was built.[2]

The old Seattle Municipal Building and Seattle Public Library were also known as relatively ugly buildings.[citation needed]

History[edit]

The plaza surrounding the building was the site of a five-month protest by homeless people opposed to funding cuts for a homeless non-profit organization in 2016.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ King County document[dead link]
  2. ^ Keith Ervin and Bob Young, Sims wants tower to replace King County's "ugly" building Archived 2006-11-05 at the Wayback Machine., Seattle Times, October 18, 2006.
  3. ^ Clarridge, Christine (September 2, 2016). "Homeless to end campout protest in Seattle plaza, move to reopened shelters". The Seattle Times. Retrieved April 12, 2018.

Coordinates: 47°36′11″N 122°19′46″W / 47.60306°N 122.32944°W / 47.60306; -122.32944