King Township Public Library

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King Township Public Library
KingCityLibrary.jpg
King City Library
Country Canada
Type Public library
Location King City, Ontario
Branches 4
Collection
Items collected business directories, phone books, maps, government publications, books, periodicals, genealogy, local history
Website www.king-library.on.ca

The King Township Public Library is a public library system that serves King Township, Ontario in Canada. It consists of four branches located in King City, Nobleton, Schomberg, and Ansnorveldt.

The library rotates certain books through the various branches to ensure all residents in the township have equal access to volumes held.

Collections include government works (e.g. federal budgets), annual reports, and maps. Periodicals and newspapers are archived for a short period of time. The library also maintains township history archives at the King City branch.

Services[edit]

The library system offers a number of programs for children and adults, plus language kits and multi-lingual books. A limited selection of music CDs and movie DVDs are available for loan in addition to book circulation.

  • Information and reference services
  • Access to full text databases
  • Community information
  • Internet access
  • Reader's advisory services
  • Programs for children, youth and adults
  • Delivery to homebound individuals
  • Interlibrary loan
  • Free downloadable audiobooks

History[edit]

James Whitling Crossley established the first library in King, the Mechanics Institute Library, which opened in 1893 in King City. In 1947, the King Memorial Library was a private-operated library opened by Marjorie Jarvis, who had been president of the Ontario Library Association in 1935—1936.[1] It was located at Memorial Park in King City, and its collection included about 1000 items, most of which are now in the current King City branch of the King Township Public Library, built in 1970.[2] In 1956, the King City Memorial Library was opened.[3]

In 1930, a library was established in Schomberg, serving the growing communities in the northeastern portion of the township. The Nobleton branch first opened to the public in 1968.[4] In 1990, a fundraising campaign was established to build a branch building in Ansnorveldt.[5] The 768 square feet (71.3 m2) building cost CA$48,000 to build, of which one third was funded by a government of Ontario grant, one third by the municipal government, and the remaining one third was raised by the community, including CA$3,000 by students of the nearby school.[5]

In 1976 and 1977, a dispute arose between the library board and the King Township Council regarding development of land adjacent to the King City branch into a lumber depot.[6] The library opposed the rezoning of the property, leading to two Ontario Municipal Board hearings and an appeal to the Ontario High Court of Justice before plans for the lumber depot were abandoned.[6]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  • Bruce, Lorne (2010). Places to Grow: Public Libraries and Communities in Ontario, 1930-2000 (reprint ed.). ISBN 9780986666605. 
  • VanderMey, Albert (1994). And the Swamp Flourished: The Bittersweet Story of Holland Marsh. Dundurn. ISBN 1895815010. 
  • "Strategic Plan, 2003, 2004, 2005". King Township Public Library. Archived from the original on 2006-05-06. Retrieved 2005-06-07. 
  • "Looking back over 1956". Newmarket Era and Express. 27 December 1956. p. 1. Retrieved 16 October 2014. 
  • "Ontario Library Review". 54-55. Provincial Library Service. 1970. 

External links[edit]