Kingdom Come (Jay-Z album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kingdom Come
Studio album by Jay-Z
Released November 21, 2006
Genre Hip hop
Length 59:21
Jay-Z chronology
Collision Course
Kingdom Come
American Gangster
Singles from Kingdom Come
  1. "Show Me What You Got"
    Released: October 30, 2006
  2. "Lost One"
    Released: December 4, 2006
  3. "30 Something"
    Released: January 9, 2007
  4. "Hollywood"
    Released: January 23, 2007

Kingdom Come is the ninth studio album by American rapper Jay-Z. It was released on November 21, 2006, by Roc-A-Fella Records. It was considered a "comeback album" for the rapper, as 2003's The Black Album was promoted as his final release. Kingdom Come received generally lukewarm reviews but was a commercial success, selling 680,000 copies in its first week, while earning Jay-Z a Grammy Award nomination for Best Rap Album. He has since considered it to be his worst album.


Kingdom Come was the first Jay-Z album released since 2003's The Black Album, which had been widely hyped as Jay-Z's "retirement" album. The video for that album's hit single "99 Problems" had ended with Jay-Z going down in a hail of gunfire. Jay-Z stated in interviews that that scene represented the "death" of Jay-Z and the "rebirth" of Shawn Carter. Because of this, Jay-Z had originally planned to release Kingdom Come under his real name of Shawn Carter, but decided in the end to release it under his more-famous stage name Jay-Z. The album's second single, "Lost One" (produced by Dr. Dre) addresses Jay's split with Roc-A-Fella co-founder Damon Dash, the death of his nephew, and supposedly his relationship with singer Beyoncé.[citation needed]

Past collaborators Kanye West and particularly Just Blaze made significant contributions to the album's production. This is the first time Dr. Dre has played a substantial role in a Jay-Z album, as he produced four beats and mixed every song on the album. Relatively unknown newcomers B-Money, Syience, and DJ Khalil also contributed to the album's production, as well as Coldplay lead singer Chris Martin. Kingdom Come's opening track "The Prelude" features additional vocals from Pain in da Ass who featured on some of Jay Z's earlier album introductions, impersonating characters from films such as Scarface, Goodfellas, and Carlito's Way.[citation needed]

Release and reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 2.5/5 stars[1]
The A.V. Club B+[2]
Entertainment Weekly B[3]
The Guardian 4/5 stars[4]
Los Angeles Times 2.5/4 stars[5]
NME 8/10[6]
Pitchfork 5/10[7]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[8]
Uncut 3/5 stars[9]
USA Today 3/4 stars[10]

Kingdom Come was released by Roc-A-Fella Records on November 21, 2006,[11] to generally lukewarm reviews from critics.[12] At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream publications, the album received an average score of 67, based on 23 reviews.[11] According to Pitchfork journalist Peter Macia, "the early consensus on Kingdom Come [was] that it's one of Jay-Z's worst albums."[7] Reviewing the record for Rolling Stone, Rob Sheffield said "the highs are really high, and the lows are really low", particularly applauding the title track and "Trouble" while finding "Beach Chair" especially awful.[8] Nathan Rabin wrote in The A.V. Club that contrary to the hype leading up to its release, Kingdom Come was "just another solid album" from a rapper who now "succeeds on craft and hard-won experience rather than hunger", finding it devoid of the urgent sense his previous records displayed.[2] Robert Christgau gave it an honorable mention in his MSN Music consumer guide, naming "30 Something" and "Minority Report" as highlights while writing that Jay-Z was enjoying "the pleasures of going legit".[13] In The New York Times, Kelefa Sanneh deemed Kingdom Come an intriguing but "halfway successful" attempt by "a grown-up rapper trying to make a grown-up album".[14] AllMusic editor Andy Kellman was more critical, dismissing the record as "a display of complacency and retreads — a gratuitous, easily resistible victory lap — that very slightly upgrades the relative worth of The Blueprint²."[1] Jay-Z later considered it to be his worst album.[15]

In the first week of release, Kingdom Come sold 680,000 copies and debuted at number one on the Billboard 200. It was the ninth album of Jay-Z's career to top the chart and tied him for third with the Rolling Stones for most American number-one albums.[16] On December 14, it was certified double platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.[17] Kingdom Come was nominated for a 2008 Grammy Award in the category of Best Rap Album;[18] the award was won by Kanye West for his 2007 album Graduation.[19] In August 2009, Kingdom Come reached sales of 1,510,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan.[20]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Producer(s) Length
1. "The Prelude"   B-Money 2:44
2. "Oh My God"   Just Blaze 4:17
3. "Kingdom Come"   Just Blaze 4:23
4. "Show Me What You Got"   Just Blaze 3:43
5. "Lost One" (featuring Chrisette Michele) 3:44
6. "Do U Wanna Ride" (featuring John Legend) Kanye West 5:29
7. "30 Something"   Dr. Dre 4:13
8. "I Made It"   DJ Khalil 3:25
9. "Anything" (featuring Usher and Pharrell) The Neptunes 4:21
10. "Hollywood" (featuring Beyoncé) 4:17
11. "Trouble"  
  • Dr. Dre
  • Mark Batson
12. "Dig a Hole" (featuring Sterling Simms) Swizz Beatz 4:11
13. "Minority Report" (featuring Ne-Yo) Dr. Dre 4:33
14. "Beach Chair" (featuring Chris Martin) Chris Martin 5:08
Samples credits[21]


Chart (2006) Peak
Canadian Albums Chart[22] 6
Dutch Albums Chart[23] 71
French Albums Chart[23] 79
German Albums Chart[23] 76
Italian Albums Chart[23] 67
Swedish Albums Chart[23] 45
Swiss Albums Chart[23] 17
Swiss Albums Chart[23] 17
UK Albums Chart[24] 35
US Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums[22] 1
US Billboard Top Rap Albums[22] 1


Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Canada (Music Canada)[25] Platinum 100,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[26] Gold 100,000^
United States (RIAA)[27] 2× Platinum 2,510,000^

*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

See also[edit]


  1. ^ a b Kellman, Andy. "Kingdom Come - Jay-Z > Review". AllMusic. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Rabin, Nathan. "Kingdom Come - Jay-Z > Review". The A.V. Club. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  3. ^ Endelman, Michael. "Kingdom Come - Jay-Z > Review". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  4. ^ Sullivan, Caroline (November 17, 2006). "Kingdom Come - Jay-Z > Review". London: The Guardian. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  5. ^ Powers, Ann (November 18, 2006). "Hail, Jay-Z, but `Kingdom' isn't exactly a royal return". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  6. ^ Pattison, Louis (November 24, 2006). "Jay-Z: Kingdom Come". NME. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Macia, Peter. "Kingdom Come - Jay-Z > Review". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  8. ^ a b Sheffield, Rob. "Kingdom Come - Jay-Z > Review". Rolling Stone. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  9. ^ Poletti, James (2006). "Jay-Z - Kingdom Come". Uncut. Archived from the original on September 11, 2016. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  10. ^ Gundersen, Edna (November 27, 2006). "This week's Listen Up reviews: Clipse, Jay-Z, Incubus, Ying Yang, Waits and more". USA Today. Archived from the original on September 11, 2016. Retrieved September 10, 2016. 
  11. ^ a b "Jay-Z Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 2006-11-21. 
  12. ^ Berrios, Martin A. (November 1, 2007). "Jay-Z: American Gangster". AllHipHop. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  13. ^ Christgau, Robert (February 2007). "Consumer Guide". MSN Music. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  14. ^ Sanneh, Kelefa (November 19, 2006). "Kingdom Come - Jay-Z > Review". The New York Times. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  15. ^ Johnson, Billy (2011-04-20). "4 Reasons Why Jay Z Considers 'Kingdom Come' His Worst Album | Yahoo Music - Yahoo Music". Retrieved 2013-12-06. 
  16. ^ "Jay-Z Reigns Atop Album Charts". Spin. November 29, 2006. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  17. ^ "Recording Industry Association of America". RIAA. 2006-12-22. Retrieved 2012-02-27. 
  18. ^ List of Grammy Award Nominess. Retrieved on 2011-5-10.
  19. ^ Grammy Award Winner 2008. Retrieved on 2011-5-10.
  20. ^ Trust, Gary (August 7, 2009). "Ask Billboard: Steve Vai, Jay-Z, Radiohead". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  21. ^ "Jay Z". WhoSampled. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  22. ^ a b c "Jay-Z - Chart history". Billboard. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f g "Jay-Z - Kingdom Come -". Hung Medien. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  24. ^ "Jay Z". Official Charts Company. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  25. ^ "Canadian album certifications – JAY Z – Kingdom Come". Music Canada. 
  26. ^ "British album certifications – JAY Z – Kingdom Come". British Phonographic Industry.  Enter Kingdom Come in the field Keywords. Select Title in the field Search by. Select album in the field By Format. Select Gold in the field By Award. Click Search
  27. ^ "American album certifications – JAY Z – Kingdom Come". Recording Industry Association of America.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Doctor's Advocate by The Game
Billboard 200 number-one album
December 3, 2006 - December 9, 2006
Succeeded by
Light Grenades by Incubus