Kingsley's Adventure

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Kingsley's Adventure
Kingsley's Adventure cover art.jpg
Developer(s)Psygnosis
Publisher(s)Psygnosis
Producer(s)Ron Festejo
Designer(s)James Smith
Programmer(s)Peter Marshall
Artist(s)Scott Butler
Platform(s)PlayStation
Release
  • NA: 28 September 1999
  • EU: 22 October 1999
Genre(s)Action-adventure
Mode(s)Single-player

Kingsley's Adventure is a 1999 action-adventure game developed and published by Psygnosis exclusively for PlayStation.

Gameplay[edit]

The game features four weapons, an axe, a sword, a crossbow and a dagger as weapons that the player can use.[1][2] A shield can also be used to defend against attacks.[3] There are fifty characters that the player can interact with, and nine boss characters as well.[1] The game also features five magic spells.[1]

Story[edit]

The story focuses on Kingsley, an orphaned fox who is adopted by the King and Queen of the Fruit Kingdom.[2] Kingsly is trained in combat and his goal is to become a True Knight.[2] Meanwhile, a chef named Bad Custard is expelled for a food poisoning incident, and begins to learn magic to plot his revenge to take over the Fruit Kingdom. One by one, the four knights of the Fruit Kingdom approached Bad Custard to stop him, but with black magic he transformed them into his own evil personal dark knights. Now Kingsley is the only who can save the Fruit Kingdom. [2]

The Gameplay starts with Kingsley being trained by Old Wrinkle a Badger who trained many knights in his time, then sets him into the obstacle course that tests his agility, combat, archery, and the ability to solve puzzles. Old Wrinkle then gives him a dagger that was handed down to every trained apprentice after surpassing being a squire. The King sends Kingsley to Sea Town, where the Walrus Pirate Gallagher the scourge of the Sevens seas, who takes the town trading galleon to force them to answer his and his master a Crocodile/Dinosaur hybrid Rex's (formally the Frog Knight) demands. The After the defeat of the Bilge rat Gallagher, Kingsley is sent to face a glutenous Dragon in Poorluck town, whom was eating the peoples food, also must remember to face Judas the Minotaur (formally the Rabbit Knight) who holds the Dragon's leash. Then the King sends Kingsley to Rosmary Town to the Abbey to solve the poisonous root beer problem caused by Clarence a Bat/demon who plagues the Abbey, and Oscar the Condor Demon (formally an Eagle Knight). Last is to help the Kingdom's most beloved Wizard regain his coat from Custards Ridley a Dungeon keeping Rat and the last dark knight (formally the Bear Knight).

After obtaining the items and restoration of the knights, Kingsley is sent to Custard's Skull Island, where he has stored the book in, the final confrontation shows a battle between honor and greed, resulting in Custards demise in the boiling cauldron of Bad Magic and Kingsley regaining the book.

After the Credits it is revealed Kingsley himself was the narrator and tells the audience to keep his secret.

Development[edit]

The game was developed by Psygnosis Camden Studio.[4] Peter Marshall was programmer for the game, and was joined by Ron Festejo as producer.[5]

Release[edit]

The game was released for the PlayStation in North America on September 28, and in Europe on October 22, 1999.

Upon release, it generated little attention and went unnoticed.[6]

Reception[edit]

Kingsley's Adventure received average or positive reviews from critics.[7]

Jeuxvideo.com gave it a 16 out of 20 score.[8]

OPM UK described the game as "strangely atmospheric" with "smashing cartoon visuals" but having "maddening controls".[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Staff, I. G. N. (1999-05-13). "Kingsley's Adventure". IGN. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  2. ^ a b c d "Kingsley's Adventure - Overview - allgame". 2014-11-17. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  3. ^ a b Official UK Playstation Magazine - Issue 048 (Future Publishing)(GB). August 1999. p. 68.
  4. ^ Square, Push (2013-01-04). "Fall of the Artificer Was a Third-Person Steampunk Platformer for PS2". Push Square. Archived from the original on 2017-07-17. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  5. ^ Drury, Paul (June 2018). "The Making of the Eyetoy Play". Retro Gamer (182): 81.
  6. ^ "Dropship". Joypad [fr] (115): 139. January 2002.
  7. ^ http://www.mobygames.com/game/kingsleys-adventure Archived 2009-11-28 at the Wayback Machine MobyGames page for Kingsley's Adventure
  8. ^ "Test Kingsley's Adventure sur PS1". Jeuxvideo.com (in French). Archived from the original on 2016-06-22. Retrieved 2018-11-15.

External links[edit]