Kingsley House and Hendre House, Monmouth

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Kingsley House
and Hendre House
No.s 8 & 10 Monk Street, Monmouth.JPG
Kingsley House and Hendre House
General information
Location Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales
Address 8 Monk Street
10 Monk Street
Coordinates 51°48′33″N 2°42′43″W / 51.80908°N 2.7119°W / 51.80908; -2.7119Coordinates: 51°48′33″N 2°42′43″W / 51.80908°N 2.7119°W / 51.80908; -2.7119
Design and construction
Architect George Vaughan Maddox
Designations Grade II Listed

Kingsley House and Hendre House are a pair of 19th-century, semi-detached houses on the North Parade section of Monk Street in Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales. The grade II listed houses were designed by noted Monmouth architect and builder George Vaughan Maddox, who also designed at least two of the twenty-four blue plaque buildings on the Monmouth Heritage Trail, including the Market Hall and the Monmouth Methodist Church. Hendre House should be distinguished from The Hendre, the estate of the Rolls family.

History and design[edit]

Kingsley House at 8 Monk Street and Hendre House at 10 Monk Street are a pair of early 19th-century, listed houses. The semi-detached houses together are in a three-storey building with a five-bay elevation. The exterior features a stucco finish and there is a hipped slate roof. The centre window bay of each of the three floors of the building is blocked. The windows on the ground floor are round-headed. Those on the uppermost floor are smaller than those on the ground and middle floors. The entrance to each house features a round-headed doorway with a six-paneled door and radiating fanlight (transom).[1][2]

Both dwellings were designed by George Vaughan Maddox, a Monmouth native who was an architect and builder.[3][4][5] Maddox, who also designed Priory Street in Monmouth, resided at Kingsley House on nearby Monk Street during the time that Priory Street was planned and constructed.[6] Not only was Maddox responsible for Priory Street and its Market Hall, which was completed in 1839, the prolific architect also designed a number of other notable buildings, including the Monmouth Methodist Church in St James Street, the Masonic Hall in Monk Street, and Oak House at 6 Monk Street.[7][8] The Market Hall and the Monmouth Methodist Church are two of the twenty-four blue plaque buildings on the Monmouth Heritage Trail.[9] Maddox also designed Croft-Y-Bwla for Thomas Dyke, a Monmouth grocer.[10] George Maddox was the son of James Maddox, another Monmouth architect and builder, who died in Monmouth in 1820.[11][12]

In 1934, Kelly's Directory of Monmouthshire indicated that John James Furney resided at Kingsley House.[13]

Kingsley House and Hendre House are both grade II listed buildings on the west side of the North Parade section of Monk Street (north of the intersection of Monk Street with Priory Street and New Dixton Road). On 27 October 1965, both houses were listed. The Cadw Building ID Number for Kingsley House is 2275, and that for Hendre House is 85015.[14][15] Hendre House should be distinguished from The Hendre, the childhood home of Charles Stewart Rolls, co-founder of Rolls-Royce Limited and aviation pioneer.[16][17][18] The grade II* listed, Victorian country house at Llangattock-Vibon-Avel now functions as the clubhouse of the Rolls of Monmouth Golf Club.[16][17][19] George Vaughan Maddox also served as an architect and builder for The Hendre, performing the first of the expansions of the mansion that were commissioned by three generations of the Rolls family.[16][20] Originally a hunting lodge, The Hendre underwent reconstruction of portions of its south wing in 1830, performed by Maddox for John Rolls (1776-1837), great-grandfather of Charles.[16][20][21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Monk Street, 8, Monmouth; Kingsley House". coflein.gov.uk. Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  2. ^ "Monk Street, 10, Monmouth; Hendre Street". coflein.gov.uk. Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  3. ^ "Walking in Monmouth, Monmouthshire and The Wye Valley". monmouth.org.uk. The Monmouth Website. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  4. ^ Antonia Brodie, British Architectural Library (2001). Directory of British Architects 1834-1914: L-Z. Continuum International Publishing Group. p. 121. ISBN 978-0-8264-4963-4. ISBN 0-8264-4963-8. 
  5. ^ "Public Architecture". llgc.org.uk. The Architecture of Wales - Architectural Drawings in The National Library of Wales. Archived from the original on 14 April 2012. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  6. ^ "Justification Statement for Repair/Replacement of Existing Veranda" (PDF). idox.monmouthshire.gov.uk. idox. Monmouthshire. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  7. ^ John Newman (11 March 2000). Gwent/Monmouthshire. Yale University Press. p. 44. 
  8. ^ "Nonconformity in Monmouth" (PDF). capeli.org.uk. The Chapels Heritage Society. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  9. ^ "Monmouth Trails". visitwyevalley.com. Wye Valley & Vale of Usk. Retrieved 17 May 2012. 
  10. ^ John Newman (11 March 2000). Gwent/Monmouthshire (illustrated ed.). Yale University Press. p. 411. ISBN 978-0-300-09630-9. 
  11. ^ "Public Architecture - House of Correction, Usj". llgc.org.uk. The Architecture of Wales - Architectural Drawings in The National Library of Wales. Archived from the original on 14 April 2012. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  12. ^ "Monmouthshire". New monthly magazine. E. W. Allen. 13: 757. 1820. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  13. ^ "Kelly's Directory of Monmouthshire 1934" (PDF). liber-mortuorum. Kelly's Directory of Monmouthshire 1934 (Hosted on Liber Mortuorum). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 February 2014. Retrieved 18 June 2012. 
  14. ^ "Kingsley House, Monmouth". britishlistedbuildings.co.uk. British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  15. ^ "Hendre House, Monmouth". britishlistedbuildings.co.uk. British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  16. ^ a b c d "A celebration of Charles Rolls" (PDF). Monmouthshire Beacon. 7 July 2010. p. 15. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  17. ^ a b "Rolls of Monmouth golf hotel sets world standard; Tourism: Six-star wonder". Western Mail. Cardiff, Wales. 25 March 2002. Retrieved 17 May 2012. 
  18. ^ "Spitfire display heralds completion of clock tower". Monmouthshire County Life: 51. June 2011. Retrieved 17 May 2012. 
  19. ^ "The Hendre, Llangattock Vibon Avel". britishlistedbuildings.co.uk. British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 17 May 2012. 
  20. ^ a b "The Rolls of Monmouth Golf". golfingvenue.co.uk. Golfing Venue. Retrieved 17 May 2012. 
  21. ^ Thomas Nicholas. Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales. Genealogical Publishing Com. p. 784. ISBN 978-0-8063-1314-6. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 

External links[edit]