Kingsport Mets

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Kingsport Mets
19212020
Kingsport, Tennessee
Kngsprtmets.pngK-Mets.PNG
Team logoCap insignia
Minor league affiliations
Class
  • Rookie (1963, 1969–1982, 1984–2020)
  • Class D- (1957, 1960–1962)
  • Class D (1955)
  • Class C (1954)
  • Class D (1921–1925, 1938–1953)
League
Major league affiliations
Team
Minor league titles
League titles (7)
  • 1944
  • 1945
  • 1951
  • 1973
  • 1977
  • 1988
  • 1995
Division titles (5)
  • 1973
  • 1977
  • 1988
  • 1995
  • 1996
Team data
Nickname
  • Kingsport Mets (1980–1982, 1984–2020)
  • Kingsport Braves (1974–1979)
  • Kingsport Royals (1969–1973)
  • Kingsport Pirates (1960–1963)
  • Kingsport Orioles (1957)
  • Kingsport Cherokees (1943–1955)
  • Kingsport Dodgers (1942)
  • Kingsport Cherokees (1938–1941)
  • Kingsport Indians (1921–1925)
ColorsBlue, orange, white
     
Ballpark

The Kingsport Mets were a Minor League Baseball team of the Appalachian League from 1921 to 2020. They were located in Kingsport, Tennessee, and were last named for the team's major league affiliate, the New York Mets. The team played its home games at Hunter Wright Stadium which opened in 1995. The Mets previously played at Dobyns-Bennett High School. In 1983, while Dobyns-Bennett's field was being renovated, the team temporarily moved to Sarasota, Florida, and played in the Gulf Coast League as the Gulf Coast League Mets.

History[edit]

The first professional team to hail from Kingsport was the Kingsport Indians who played in the Appalachian League from 1921 to 1925. From 1938 to 1941, the Kingsport team was known as the Cherokees, but changed to the Dodgers in 1942 when the team became a farm team of Major League Baseball's Brooklyn Dodgers. They reverted to the Cherokees name in 1943 and continued to play under this moniker through 1955. The Kingsport Cherokees competed in the Mountain States League from 1953 to 1954, before returning to the Appalachian League in 1957 as the Kingsport Orioles after two years of dormancy. After another two years on hiatus, Kingsport returned as the Pirates from 1960 to 1963. From 1969 to 1970, they competed as the Kingsport Royals. Notable players during this period include Al Cowens and U L Washington.

From 1974 to 1979, they were known as the Braves. As an Atlanta Braves affiliate, multiple future major leaguers played for them, including Matt Sinatro, Rick Behenna, Jose Alvarez, Steve Bedrosian, Paul Runge, Brad Komminsk, Milt Thompson, Brook Jacoby, and Mike Payne. Additionally, National League MVP Dale Murphy and Cy Young Award winner Steve Bedrosian played in Kingsport.

In 1980, the team became known as the Kingsport Mets, the name under which the team has competed since then—with the exception of playing the 1983 season in Sarasota, Florida, as the Gulf Coast League Mets while their home stadium underwent renovations. Players Darryl Strawberry, Dwight Gooden, Kevin Mitchell, José Reyes, David Wright, Lastings Milledge, and A. J. Burnett made their professional debuts in Kingsport. The Mets won the Appalachian League Championship in 1988 and 1995.

The start of the 2020 season was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic before ultimately being cancelled on June 30.[1][2] In conjunction with a contraction of Minor League Baseball beginning with the 2021 season, the Appalachian League was reorganized as a collegiate summer baseball league, and the Mets were replaced by a new franchise in the revamped league designed for rising college freshman and sophomores.[3]

All Silver Anniversary Team[edit]

In 2005, the team selected 14 former players and a manager for its All Silver Anniversary Team in commemoration of 25 years as a Mets affiliate.

Position Player
Catcher Brook Fordyce
First baseman Gregg Jefferies
Second baseman Quilvio Veras
Shortstop José Reyes
Third baseman David Wright
Left fielder Kevin Mitchell
Center fielder Preston Wilson
Right fielder Darryl Strawberry
Designated hitter Terrence Long
Utility player Brian Daubach
Right-handed pitcher Dwight Gooden
Left-handed pitcher Pete Schourek
Relief pitcher Randy Myers
Relief pitcher Jason Isringhausen
Manager John Gibbons

Year-by-year record[edit]

(from Baseball Reference)

Year Record Win % Finish GB Manager Postseason
1974 31–39–1 .443 7th 21.5 Hoyt Wilhelm
1975 33–33 .500 6th 7 Gene Hassell
1976 25–42 .373 8th 23.5 Bobby Dews
1977 43–26 .623 1st Bob Didier League Champions
1978 33–37 .471 5th 8.5 Eddie Haas
1979 39–31 .557 2nd 15.5 Gene Hassell
1980 35–35–1 .500 3rd 11 Chuck Hiller
1981 21–49 .300 6th 25 Al Jackson
1982 28–40 .412 7th 4.5 Ed Olsen
1984 31–38 .449 7th 9 Dan Radison

Playoffs[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

Baseball Hall of Fame alumni

Notable alumni

  • Jacob deGrom (2010) 3 x MLB All-Star; 2014 NL Rookie of the Year; 2018 and 2019 NL Cy Young
  • Dwight Gooden (1982) 4 x MLB All-Star; 1984 NL Rookie of the Year; 1985 NL Cy Young Award
  • Dale Murphy (1974) MLB All-Star; 2 x NL Most Valuable Player (1982-1983)
  • Jose Reyes (2000) 3 x MLB All-Star; 2011 NL Batting Title

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A Message From Pat O'Conner". Minor League Baseball. March 13, 2020. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  2. ^ "2020 Minor League Baseball Season Shelved". Minor League Baseball. June 30, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  3. ^ "MLB, USA Baseball Announce New Format for Appalachian League". Major League Baseball. September 29, 2020. Retrieved September 29, 2020.

External links[edit]