Kinsky horse

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Kinsky Horse
Jerome Kinsky Zlosyn 2005.jpg
Conservation status
Other names
  • Czech: Kůň Kinský
  • Golden Horse of Bohemia[3]:74
Country of originCzech Republic
DistributionBohemia
Use
Traits
Height
  • 162–175 cm[4]:459
Colour

The Kinsky Horse is a Czech breed of warmblood sport horse. It was bred by the Kinsky family in the Kingdom of Bohemia, and is now one of four warmblood sport horse breeds reared in the Czech Republic, the others being the Czech Warmblood, the Slovakian Warmblood and the Moravian Warmblood.[4]:459 It was for many years absorbed into the Czech Warmblood; a separate stud-book was established in 2005.[4]:459 It is characterised by an unusual golden-yellow coat, though other colours are also seen.[5]:226

History[edit]

The Kinsky Horse was bred in the nineteenth century by members of the Kinsky family in the Kingdom of Bohemia, and was sometimes known as the Golden Horse of Bohemia.[4]:459[5]:226 In the twentieth century it was largely absorbed into the Czech Warmblood. A separate stud-book for the breed was established in 2005.[4]:459

Its conservation status was not listed by the FAO in 2007.[1]:34 In 2018 the population reported to DAD-IS was about 600 head, and the conservation status in 2020 was reported as "at risk".[2]

Characteristics[edit]

The horses usually stand between 162 and 175 cm at the withers.[4]:459 Many have a coat of a characteristic golden-yellow colour, but others may be bay, chestnut or occasionally black.[5]:226

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Barbara Rischkowsky, D. Pilling (eds.) (2007). List of breeds documented in the Global Databank for Animal Genetic Resources, annex to The State of the World's Animal Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. ISBN 9789251057629. Accessed January 2017.
  2. ^ a b Breed data sheet: Kun Kinsky / Czech Republic (Horse). Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed February 2020.
  3. ^ L. Putnová, R. Štohl, I. Vrtková (2018). Genetic monitoring of horses in the Czech Republic: A large‐scale study with a focus on the Czech autochthonous breeds. Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics 135 (1): 73–83. doi:10.1111/jbg.12313.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Valerie Porter, Lawrence Alderson, Stephen J.G. Hall, D. Phillip Sponenberg (2016). Mason's World Encyclopedia of Livestock Breeds and Breeding (sixth edition). Wallingford: CABI. ISBN 9781780647944.
  5. ^ a b c Élise Rousseau, Yann Le Bris, Teresa Lavender Fagan (2017). Horses of the World. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 9780691167206.

Further reading[edit]