Kirk Deighton

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Kirk Deighton
Main Street, Kirk Deighton.jpg
Main street, Kirk Deighton
Kirk Deighton is located in North Yorkshire
Kirk Deighton
Kirk Deighton
Location within North Yorkshire
Population484 (2011 Census)[1]
OS grid referenceSE398503
Civil parish
  • Kirk Deighton
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townWETHERBY
Postcode districtLS22
PoliceNorth Yorkshire
FireNorth Yorkshire
AmbulanceYorkshire
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
53°56′52″N 1°23′38″W / 53.94783°N 1.39390°W / 53.94783; -1.39390Coordinates: 53°56′52″N 1°23′38″W / 53.94783°N 1.39390°W / 53.94783; -1.39390

Kirk Deighton is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated north-west of Wetherby, to which it is contiguous, and near the A1(M). The village was in the West Riding of Yorkshire, and Wetherby Rural District, until 1974, and is now on the border between West Yorkshire and North Yorkshire: the village is in North Yorkshire, and Wetherby in the Leeds metropolitan district of West Yorkshire. Kirk Deighton has a population of less than 500 people, measured at 484 in the 2011 Census.[1]

History[edit]

Kirk Deighton and its church (All Saints' Church) were mentioned in the Domesday Book.[2] The name of the village derives from Kirk (meaning church) and Dĩc-tūn; a town surrounded by a moat or ditch.[3][4] At the 2001 Census, the population of the village was 386,[5] which by the 2011 Census had risen to 484.[1] In 2015, North Yorkshire County Council estimated the population to be 500.[6]

Historically, the village and parish were in the Wetherby Rural District and the Wapentake of Claro.[7][8][9][10] In 1974, the village was moved into North Yorkshire (from the West Riding of Yorkshire) and is now in the Harrogate District.[11]

Architecture[edit]

The most architecturally notable building in the village is All Saints' Church, the main structure of which dates between the 12th and 14th century. Kirk Deighton Hall is a late 18th century private residence situated off Mark Lane and is Grade II listed.[12] Main Street has a mixture of buildings dating from the 16th to the 19th century. There are some twentieth century council houses on Wetherby Road as well as some twentieth century private houses on Ashdale Lane.[13]

Amenities[edit]

The village has a church, a public house, an antiques dealer, a football club and club house, a cricket club that plays in the Nidderdale League and a village hall. Kirk Deighton amenities serve residents of the Ainsty and Badgerwood areas of north-east Wetherby.

The Bay Horse

The Bay Horse public house in the centre of the village was originally two, the Bay Horse and The Grey Hound until they were converted into one pub, taking the Bay Horse name.[14] The community centre was built in the mid-1970s, but fell into disrepair. It was demolished in 2012 and part of the land on which it stood was sold for housing raising funds for a new village hall, which was officially opened on the 8 September 2013.[15]

Kirk Deighton Site of Special Scientific Interest[edit]

Within the village is Kirk Deighton SSSI,[16] a Site of Special Scientific Interest that is home to a population of Great Crested Newts (Triturus cristatus).[17] The site is situated off Lime Kiln Lane and was designated in 2000. It is not publicly accessible.

Transport[edit]

Aerial view of Kirk Deighton showing Main Street looking south

Wetherby services is centred on the A1(M) motorway junction 46, serving the village and north Wetherby. It was built during the upgrade of the A1 trunk road to motorway standard.[18]

Kirk Deighton is served by route 8, Harrogate to Wetherby, and route X80, Wetherby to Knaresborough.[19]

Sport[edit]

Kirk Deighton has a football club; Kirk Deighton Rangers who play on Barr Field,[20] and a Cricket club; Kirk Deighton Cricket Club who play on Mark Lane.[21]

Education[edit]

Kirk Deighton was endowed with a free school c. 1791 by a gift in the will of Sir Hugh Palliser. It was rebuilt in 1846, and again in 1893,[22] becoming had a Church of England voluntary controlled primary school. The school closed in 1991.[23] The building is now a private residence. The closest primary school is Deighton Gates in Wetherby and the closest secondary school is Wetherby High School, however as these lie across the border in West Yorkshire it is more common for children in Kirk Deighton to be educated in Spofforth and Knaresborough.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Kirk Deighton Parish (E04007370)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  2. ^ "[Kirk and North] Deighton | Domesday Book". opendomesday.org. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  3. ^ "Kirk Deighton :: Survey of English Place-Names". epns.nottingham.ac.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  4. ^ Ekwall, Eilert (1960). The concise Oxford dictionary of English place-names (4 ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 141. ISBN 0-19-869103-3.
  5. ^ UK Census (2001). "Local Area Report – Kirk Deighton Parish (36UD068)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  6. ^ "2015 Population Estimates Parishes" (PDF). northyorks.gov.uk. December 2016. p. 13. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  7. ^ "Wetherby RD". visionofbritain.org.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  8. ^ "Genuki: Kirk Deighton, Yorkshire (West Riding)". www.genuki.org.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  9. ^ "Kirkdeighton Registration District". www.ukbmd.org.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  10. ^ "Claro Wapentake :: Survey of English Place-Names". epns.nottingham.ac.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  11. ^ "Kirk Deighton, Harrogate". getoutside.ordnancesurvey.co.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  12. ^ Historic England. "Kirk Deighton Hall (Grade II) (1150323)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  13. ^ KDCACA 2008, p. 12.
  14. ^ "The Bay Horse Website".
  15. ^ "History of the Hall – Kirk Deighton Village Hall CIO". kirkdeightonvillagehall.org.uk/. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  16. ^ Dickinson, Michelle (16 August 2000). "Kirk Deighton SSSI, details". designatedsites.naturalengland.org.uk. Natural England. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  17. ^ "Kirk Deighton - Special Areas of Conservation". sac.jncc.gov.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  18. ^ "Post Opening Project Evaluation A1(M) Bramham to Wetherby Five Years After Opening Study November 2015" (PDF). assets.publishing.service.gov.uk. 2015. p. 89. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  19. ^ "Kirk Deighton – bustimes.org". bustimes.org. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  20. ^ "Kirk Deighton Rangers". kirkdeightonrangers.com. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  21. ^ KDCACA 2008, p. 13.
  22. ^ Speight, Harry (1906). Nidderdale, from Nun Monkton to Whernside; being a record of the history, antiquities, scenery, old homes, families, &c., of the beautiful valley of the Nidd. London: E Stock. p. 174. OCLC 6678660.
  23. ^ "Kirk Deighton CofE School - GOV.UK". get-information-schools.service.gov.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  24. ^ Hammer, Paul E. J. "Manners, Roger, fifth earl of Rutland". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/17962. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  25. ^ Laughton, J. K. "Palliser, Sir Hugh, first baronet". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/21165. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  26. ^ "Resignations and retirements". The Church Times. June 2015. Retrieved 15 July 2021.

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]

Media related to Kirk Deighton at Wikimedia Commons