Kirsten van de Ven

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Kirsten van de Ven
UEFA13 NL 07 van de Ven Kirsten 130711 GER-NL 0-0 214657 3812.jpg
Personal information
Full name Kirsten Johanna Maria van de Ven
Date of birth (1985-05-11) 11 May 1985 (age 33)
Place of birth Heesch, Netherlands
Height 173 cm (5 ft 8 in)
Playing position Winger
Youth career
2002–2004 HVCH
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2004 Quinnipiac Bobcats 18 (12)
2005–2007 Florida State Seminoles 68 (13)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2008–2009 Willem II Tilburg 30 (13)
2010–2013 Tyresö FF 79 (39)
2014–2015 FC Rosengård 27 (8)
2016 FC Twente 5 (0)
National team
2002 Netherlands U-17 5 (0)
2001–2004 Netherlands U-19 29 (10)
2004–2016 Netherlands 87 (18)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Kirsten Johanna Maria van de Ven (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈkɪrstən joːˈɦɑnaː maːˈriaː vɑn də ˈvɛn]; born 11 May 1985)[1] is a former Dutch professional footballer. Prior to her professional career, she played College soccer in the United States. Professionally she played in the Dutch league (Eredivisie) for Willem II Tilburg and FC Twente, and in the Swedish league (Damallsvenskan) for Tyresö FF and FC Rosengård. She won titles at clubs in both Sweden and the Netherlands, as an international player she was a member of the Netherlands women's national football team, and represented her country at the 2009 and 2013 editions of the UEFA Women's Championship, and the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Club career[edit]

Early years and college soccer[edit]

Born in Heesch,[2] she started playing for local amateur club Heesche Voetbal Club Heesch (HVCH) progressing through the boys teams from F4 to the A1 team.[3] In 2004, at the age of 19, she moved to the United States and played College soccer firstly for Quinnipiac Bobcats, where after scoring 12 goals in 18 matches of the 2004 Northeast Conference season,[4] she was named the Northeast Conference's Rookie of the Year and Player of the Year.[5] The remaining three years of her college career were played in the Florida State Seminoles at NCAA level, as a team mate of Hermann Trophy winner Mami Yamaguchi.[6][7] For the Seminoles she scored 5 goals in 18 matches in the 2005–06 season, 1 goal in 24 matches in 2006–07 and 7 goals in 26 matches in 2007–08.[8]

Professional[edit]

In the end of 2007, she returned to the Netherlands and begun her professional career in January 2008, playing the second half of the 2007–08 Eredivisie season for Willem II Tilburg, helping the team finish as runners-up. In December 2009 it was announced she would join newly promoted Swedish league (Damallsvenskan) club Tyresö FF from March 2010.[9][10]

Playing for Tyresö FF in 2012

At Tyresö FF, after being Swedish Cup runner-up in 2011 and 2012,[11][12] she won the Damallsvenskan in 2012, after beating title rivals LdB FC Malmö 1–0 away in the last round of the season, the goal scored at the 82nd minute of the match. The result meant Tyresö FF clinched the title on goal difference as both teams finished the season on 55 points.[13][14] Despite losing the Swedish Supercup in 2013 to Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC on penalty shootout,[15] she made her debut in the UEFA Women's Champions League, scoring a goal in the Round of 16 of the 2013–14 season and helping the team progress further in the tournament.[16]

In December 2013, after four years at Tyresö FF, where she scored 39 league goals in 79 league matches, it was announced that in search of a new challenge she had signed a two year contract with Damallsvenkan rivals LdB FC Malmö (later re-named FC Rosengård) from January 2014.[17][18] In the two seasons played with the club, she won the Damallsvenkan twice (2014 and 2015), the Swedish Supercup in 2015 and was runner-up of the Swedish Cup in 2014–15.[19][20] She also played 9 matches and scored 2 goals for the club in Champions League campaigns.[16]

She returned to her home country in January 2016, signing a half year contract with Dutch champions FC Twente to play the second half of the 2015–16 Eredivisie season.[21][22] After winning the Dutch title, she announced her retirement from football on 23 May 2016.[23][24]

International career[edit]

She progressed through the national youth teams, where she played for the under-17[25] and under-19 (including the 2003 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship).[26]

On 6 August 2004 she made her debut for the senior Netherlands national team under coach Remy Reynierse, coming on as a half-time substitute in a 0–2 friendly defeat to Japan in Zeist.[27][28] She played in the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification.[29]

Selected by coach Vera Pauw to be in the national squad for the UEFA Women's Euro 2009,[1] on 23 August 2009 she scored the opening goal in a 2–0 win over Ukraine at the tournament's opening match and the Netherlands debut in a major competition.[30] Her second goal in the tournament came in the Dutch second match, a 1–2 defeat to tournament hosts Finland. She played in all of the Netherlands five matches in the tournament helping the team reach the semifinals.[31]

In June 2013 national team coach Roger Reijners selected her in the 23 player squad for the UEFA Women's Euro 2013 in Sweden.[32]

She was named by coach Roger Reijners in the Dutch squad for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.[33] At the tournament, she scored in the group stage 1–1 draw with hosts Canada and in their 1–2 Round of 16 defeat to Japan.[34]

Shortly after the World Cup, on 23 October 2015, under coach Arjan van der Laan, she made her 87th and final appearance for the national team, in a 2–1 friendly away win over France at Stade Jean-Bouin. She scored 18 goals for the national team.[35]

International goals[edit]

Scores and results list the Netherlands goal tally first.[27]
Goal Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 25 October 2008 Pabellón de la Ciudad del Fútbol, Madrid, Spain  Spain 2–0 2–0 2009 UEFA Women's Euro qualification
2. 23 August 2009 Veritas Stadion, Turku, Finland  Ukraine 1–0 2–0 UEFA Women's Euro 2009
3. 26 August 2009 Olympic Stadium, Helsinki, Finland  Finland 1–1 1–2 UEFA Women's Euro 2009
4. 3 March 2010 GSP Stadium, Nicosia, Cyprus   Switzerland 4–0 4–0 2010 Cyprus Cup
5. 21 August 2010 Haradzki Stadium, Maladzechna, Belarus  Belarus 1–0 4–0 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification
6. 12 December 2010 Estádio do Pacaembu, São Paulo, Brazil  Brazil 1–1 2–3 2010 Torneio Internacional
7. 15 December 2010 Estádio do Pacaembu, São Paulo, Brazil  Mexico 1–0 3–1 2010 Torneio Internacional
8. 19 December 2010 Estádio do Pacaembu, São Paulo, Brazil  Mexico 1–0 2–1 2010 Torneio Internacional
9. 7 March 2011 Ammochostos Stadium, Larnaca, Cyprus   Switzerland 1–0 6–0 2011 Cyprus Cup
10. 2–0
11. 3–0
12. 3 April 2011 Kras Stadion, Volendam, Netherlands  Scotland 1–0 6–2 Friendly
13. 22 October 2011 Gradski stadion, Vrbovec, Croatia  Croatia 2–0 3–0 UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying
14. 19 November 2011 Ivančna Gorica Stadium, Ivančna Gorica, Slovenia  Slovenia 1–0 2–0 UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying
15. 5 April 2012 De Koel, Venlo, Netherlands  Slovenia 2–1 3–1 UEFA Women's Euro 2013 qualifying
16. 7 February 2015 Polman Stadion, Almelo, Netherlands  Thailand 7–0 7–0 Friendly
17. 15 June 2015 Olympic Stadium, Montreal, Canada  Canada 1–1 1–1 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup
18. 23 June 2015 BC Place, Vancouver, Canada  Japan 1–2 1–2 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup

Other activities[edit]

Since September 2017, she is working for the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB) as a manager responsible to help develop the women's and girls football in the Netherlands.[3]

Personal life[edit]

While playing College soccer in the United States, she graduated in Psychology. Later she also completed a Master's degree in Labour and Organizational psychology at the Tilburg University.[3]

Honours[edit]

Tyresö FF
FC Rosengård
FC Twente

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Women's EURO 2009 - UEFA Competitions Association player list" (PDF). DFB. UEFA. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 October 2012. Retrieved 28 May 2013. 
  2. ^ "Kirsten van de Ven". vrouwenvoetbalnederland.nl (in Dutch). 26 March 2015. Archived from the original on 19 April 2015. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c "Kirsten van de Ven nieuwe manager vrouwenvoetbal". onsoranje.nl (in Dutch). 30 September 2017. Retrieved 13 January 2018. 
  4. ^ "Quinnipiac 2004 Stats". Northeast Conference. Retrieved 14 January 2018. 
  5. ^ "Quinnipiac's Kirsten van de Ven Selected NEC Women's Soccer Player & Rookie of the Year". Northeast Conference. 4 November 2004. Retrieved 28 May 2013. 
  6. ^ "Kirsten van de Ven - Profile". Florida State Seminoles. Archived from the original on 27 January 2008. Retrieved 14 January 2018. 
  7. ^ "Kirsten van de Ven Nominated For Lowe's Senior CLASS Award". Florida State Seminoles. 24 September 2007. Retrieved 14 January 2018. 
  8. ^ "Archived Team-By-Team Final Statistics / Player/Coach Search". NCAA. Retrieved 14 January 2018. 
  9. ^ "Kirsten van de Ven naar Zweedse competitie". vrouwenvoetbalnederland.nl (in Dutch). 16 December 2009. Archived from the original on 30 May 2012. Retrieved 14 January 2018. 
  10. ^ Awondatu, Sandra (2 January 2010). "Kirsten van de Ven: De top halen, maar niet ten koste van alles" (in Dutch). VrouwenvoetbalNederland.nl. Archived from the original on 18 December 2013. Retrieved 28 May 2013. 
  11. ^ Lindmark, Stig (29 October 2011). "Göteborg cupmästare i dramatisk final". SvFF (in Swedish). Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  12. ^ "Göteborg vinnare igen i finaldrama". SvFF (in Swedish). 11 October 2012. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  13. ^ Cleris, Johannes (3 November 2012). "Tyresö vann SM-guld efter dramatik" (in Swedish). Dagens Nyheter. Retrieved 12 December 2013. 
  14. ^ Perlskog, En. "En Perlskog summerar 2012". SvFF (in Swedish). Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  15. ^ "K/G supercupsegrare efter straffar". SvFF (in Swedish). 1 April 2013. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  16. ^ a b "Profile". UEFA. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  17. ^ "Kirsten van de Ven vertrekt naar LdB Malmö". vrouwenvoetbalnieuws.nl (in Dutch). 12 December 2013. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  18. ^ "Tyresö tappar landslagsspelare till Malmö" (in Swedish). Damfotboll.com. 12 December 2013. Archived from the original on 12 December 2013. Retrieved 12 December 2013. 
  19. ^ Lindmark, Stig (15 March 2015). "Marta sköt Supercupen till Rosengård". SvFF (in Swedish). Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  20. ^ "Ännu en cuptitel för Linköping". SvFF (in Swedish). 9 August 2015. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  21. ^ "Kirsten van de Ven naar FC Twente Vrouwen". FC Twente (in Dutch). 12 January 2016. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  22. ^ "Twente strikt Kirsten van de Ven" (in Dutch). De Telegraaf. 12 January 2016. Retrieved 27 January 2016. 
  23. ^ "Kirsten van de Ven beëindigt succesvolle carrière". FC Twente (in Dutch). 23 May 2016. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  24. ^ "Kirsten Van de Ven eindigt carrière met landstitel". Algemeen Dagblad (in Dutch). ANP. 23 May 2016. Retrieved 23 May 2016. 
  25. ^ "Profile u-17". onsoranje.nl (in Dutch). Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  26. ^ "Profile u-19". onsoranje.nl (in Dutch). Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  27. ^ a b "Profile". onsoranje.nl (in Dutch). Retrieved 13 January 2018. 
  28. ^ Duret, Sébastien (5 April 2005). "International Matches (Women) 2004". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 May 2013. 
  29. ^ Kirsten van de VenFIFA competition record
  30. ^ "Memory Match: debuut eindronde". onsoranje.nl (in Dutch). 4 June 2015. Retrieved 12 January 2018. 
  31. ^ "2009 Women's Euro - Netherlands squad". UEFA. Retrieved 11 January 2018. 
  32. ^ Scholten, Berend (30 June 2013). "Trio miss cut in Netherlands squad". UEFA. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
  33. ^ "List of Players - Netherlands" (PDF). FIFA. 30 May 2015. p. 16. Retrieved 31 May 2015. 
  34. ^ "Profile". FIFA. Retrieved 24 June 2015. 
  35. ^ "Afscheid van kwartet bepalende OranjeLeeuwinnen". onsoranje.nl (in Dutch). 31 March 2017. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 

External links[edit]