Kirsty Logan

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Kirsty Logan
ResidenceScotland
OccupationWriter

Kirsty Logan is a Scottish novelist, poet, performer, literary editor, writing mentor, book reviewer and writer of short fiction. She lives in Glasgow. She wrote her undergraduate thesis on retold fairytales, and her work has been broadcast on BBC Radio 4.[1] She cites Emma Donoghue and Angela Carter as her main influences.[2]

Work[edit]

Her first collection of short stories, The Rental Heart and Other Fairytales was published by Salt in 2014. The collection was shortlisted for the 2014 Green Carnation Prize for LGBT writers, and also won the Polari First Book Prize 2015 (awarded each year to a writer whose debut work explores the LGBT experience), the 2013 Scott Prize for Short Stories, The Herald: Book of the Year 2014 and the Saboteur Award for Best Short Story Collection.[3] It was also nominated for the 2014 Saltire Scottish First Book of the Year Award[4] and longlisted for the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award.[1]

Her debut novel, The Gracekeepers, was published by Harvill Secker in 2015,[1] and won the Lambda Literary Award for Best LGBT SF/F/Horror in 2016.[5] She was interviewed as part of Glasgow's Aye Write! Festival in 2015 where she read an extract from The Gracekeepers,[6] and on 25 November 2015 appeared as the Scottish Book Trust New Writers Award winner at Morningside Library in Edinburgh as part of Book Week Scotland 2015.[7]

In 2013 the Association for Scottish Literary Studies selected Logan to be the recipient of Creative Scotland's first Dr Gavin Wallace Fellowship,[8] to enable her to produce a collection of short fiction inspired by Scottish folklore. In 2015 this book, her second short-story collection, A Portable Shelter, was published by ASLS.[9] In 2016 A Portable Shelter was longlisted for the Edge Hill Short Story Prize,[10] and in 2017 the collection was shortlisted for the Green Carnation Prize.[11]

In 2012 she was one of twenty-one women writers and artists who contributed to the Glasgow Women's Library 21 Revolutions publication, released to mark the organisation's twenty-first year. She contributed a collage on paper entitled This is Liberty.[12]

Awards[edit]

  • 2013 Scott Prize for Short Stories: The Rental Heart and Other Fairytales[3]
  • 2013/14 Dr. Gavin Wallace Fellow[8]
  • 2014 The Herald: Book of the Year: The Rental Heart and Other Fairytales[3]
  • 2014 Saboteur Award for Best Short Story Collection: The Rental Heart and Other Fairytales[13]
  • 2015 Polari First Book Prize: The Rental Heart and Other Fairytales[3]
  • 2016 Lambda Literary Award for Best LGBT SF/F/Horror: The Gracekeepers[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The Write Stuff: The Gracekeepers by Kirsty Logan". www.scotsman.com. Retrieved 2016-04-01.
  2. ^ "Interview: Kirsty Logan, 'My childhood was very rich in stories'". The List. Retrieved 2016-03-30.
  3. ^ a b c d Salt. "The Rental Heart and Other Fairytales". Salt. Retrieved 2016-03-30.
  4. ^ "2014 Saltire Literary Awards – Full list of winners | Book News | The Skinny". www.theskinny.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-03-30.
  5. ^ a b "28th Annual Lammy Award Winners Announced". www.lambdaliterary.org. Lambda Literary. 7 June 2016. Retrieved 9 June 2016.
  6. ^ "Aye Write! Programme unveiled". www.glasgowlife.org.uk. Retrieved 2016-03-30.
  7. ^ "Book Week Scotland: Scottish book events - The Skinny". www.theskinny.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-03-30.
  8. ^ a b "Kirsty Logan named inaugural Dr. Gavin Wallace Fellow". www.creativescotland.com. Creative Scotland. 14 February 2014. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  9. ^ "A Portable Shelter". asls.arts.gla.ac.uk. Association for Scottish Literary Studies. 10 August 2016. Retrieved 8 June 2016.
  10. ^ "Edge Hill Short Story Prize longlist announced - News". www.edgehill.ac.uk. Edge Hill University. 9 March 2016. Retrieved 8 June 2016.
  11. ^ "The Green Carnation Prize Shortlist 2016". greencarnationprize.com. The Green Carnation Prize. 28 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  12. ^ Logan, Kirsty (2014). Patrick, Adele, ed. 21 Revolutions - This is Liberty. Glasgow: Freight Books. pp. 126–128. ISBN 978-0-9522273-3-5.
  13. ^ "Saboteur Awards". Sabotage. Retrieved 2016-03-30.