Kit Harington

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Kit Harington
Kit Harington June 2014.jpg
Harington in June 2014
Born Christopher Catesby Harington
(1986-12-26) 26 December 1986 (age 28)
London, England
Alma mater Central School of Speech and Drama
Occupation Actor
Years active 2008–present

Christopher Catesby "Kit" Harington[1][2] (born 26 December 1986)[1] is an English actor. He rose to fame playing the role of Jon Snow in the television series Game of Thrones.[3] Harington also played the lead role of Milo in the 2014 film Pompeii and voiced the character of Eret in How to Train Your Dragon 2.

Early life[edit]

Harington's uncle is Sir Nicholas John Harington,[4] the 14th Baronet Harington,[5] and his paternal great-grandfather was Sir Richard Harington, the 12th Baronet Harington. Through his paternal grandmother, Lavender Cecilia Denny, Kit's eight times great-grandfather was Charles II of England.[6] Also through his father, Harington descends from politician Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville,[7] the bacon merchant T. A. Denny, clergyman Baptist Wriothesley Noel, merchant and politician Peter Baillie, peer William Legge, 4th Earl of Dartmouth, and MP Sir William Molesworth, 6th Baronet.[8]

Harington was born in Acton, London[9] to David Richard Harington, a businessman, and Deborah Jane Catesby, a former playwright.[10][11] His mother named him after Christopher Marlowe, whose first name was shortened to Kit,[12] a name Harington prefers.[13] He was a pupil at the Southfield Primary School from 1992 to 1998. When he was 11, his family moved to Worcestershire,[14][15] and he studied at the Chantry High School in Martley until 2003.[16] He became interested in acting after watching a production of Waiting for Godot when he was 14,[17] and he performed in several school productions.[16] He attended Worcester Sixth Form College, where he studied Drama and Theatre Studies, between 2003 and 2005. When he was 17, he was inspired to study acting in a drama school after watching a performance by Ben Whishaw playing Hamlet in 2004.[14][18] He moved back to London when he was eighteen to attend the Central School of Speech and Drama, from which he graduated in 2008.[19][20]

Career[edit]

Harington (far right) with his Game of Thrones co-stars Maisie Williams, Sophie Turner, Alfie Allen, and Richard Madden in November 2009

Before acting, Harington originally wanted to become a journalist, a cameraman or a war correspondent.[21][22] While still at drama school, he landed the role of Albert in the National Theatre's adaptation of War Horse.[2][21][22] The play won two Olivier Awards, and gained Harington a great deal of recognition. He was later cast in his second play Posh, a dark ensemble comedy about upper-class men attending Oxford University.[2]

After War Horse, Harington auditioned for and landed his first television role as Jon Snow in the television series Game of Thrones. The show debuted in 2011 to great critical acclaim. Harington's role is largely filmed in Iceland and Northern Ireland.[23]

Harington made his cinematic debut in 2012 as Vincent in Silent Hill: Revelation 3D. He was honored with Actor of the Year at the Young Hollywood Awards 2013, which celebrates the best emerging young talent in film, music and television.[24] In 2014, he played Milo in Pompeii and voiced Eret in How to Train Your Dragon 2.[25]

In 2015, he appeared alongside Jeff Bridges in the film Seventh Son.[26] Harington played Roland Leighton, the main character's love interest, in Testament of Youth, which was released in October 2014.

In December 2014, it was announced that he will be featured in Xavier Dolan's upcoming movie The Death and Life of John F. Donovan, alongside Jessica Chastain.[27]

He will star in the 2015 HBO comedy 7 Days In Hell, a short film about a 7-day tennis match.[28]

Filmography[edit]

Speaking at the Game of Thrones panel, 2013 San Diego Comic Con International

Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
2012 Silent Hill: Revelation 3D Vincent
2014 Pompeii Milo
2014 How to Train Your Dragon 2 Eret (voice)
2014 Testament of Youth Roland Leighton
2015 Seventh Son Billy Bradley
2015 Spooks: The Greater Good Will Holloway

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
2011–2015 Game of Thrones Jon Snow Main role
2015 7 Days In Hell Charles Poole Television Film

Video games[edit]

Year Title Role
2014 Game of Thrones Jon Snow (voice)

Theatre[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
2008–2009 War Horse Albert Narracott Olivier Theatre and New London Theatre[29][30]
2010 Posh Ed Montgomery Royal Court Theatre
2015 The Vote Colin Henderson Donmar Warehouse

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Nominated work Award Result
2011 Game of Thrones Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actor on Television Nominated
Scream Award for Best Ensemble Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series Nominated
2013 N/A Young Hollywood Award for Actor of the Year Won
2013 Game of Thrones Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series Nominated
2014 Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series Nominated

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Kit Harrington". TVGuide.com. Retrieved 2015-06-24. 
  2. ^ a b c "Kit Harington". Yahoo! Movies. Archived from the original on March 2, 2014. Retrieved 2014-07-13. 
  3. ^ Low, Lenny Ann (22 March 2014). "Game of Throne's Kit Harington: Man for all seasons". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  4. ^ "Person Page 43217: Christopher Harington". thepeerage.com. 2014. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  5. ^ "Nicholas John Harington". Geneall.net. Retrieved 5 June 2013. 
  6. ^ "Lavender Cecilia Denny". Geneall.net. Retrieved 5 June 2013. 
  7. ^ Siobhan Synnot (11 January 2015). "Kit Harington discusses release of his new film". The Scotsman. 
  8. ^ "Kit Harington". EthniCelebs. Retrieved 2014-07-13. [unreliable source?]
  9. ^ Sophie Heawood (1 May 2014). "Meet Kit Harington: Game of Thrones hunk and Hollywood's hottest new player". Evening Standard. 
  10. ^ Ed Cumming (3 May 2015). "Kit Harington: ‘The acting never feels like work’". The Observer. 
  11. ^ Cindy Pearlman (20 March 2014). "Jon Snow knows the right moves — sometimes". Chicago Sun-Times. 
  12. ^ Lenny Ann Low (22 March 2014). "Game of Throne's Kit Harington: Man for all seasons". Sydney Morning Herald. 
  13. ^ Emma Brown. "The HBO Heartthrob: Kit Harington". Interview. 
  14. ^ a b Alex Bilmes (6 May 2015). "Mr Kit Harington". Mr Porter. 
  15. ^ "Nerdist Podcast Episode 482: Kit Harington". Nerdist. 2014-02-28. Retrieved 2014-07-13. 
  16. ^ a b James Connell (7 April 2014). "Game of Thrones star says Worcester will always be home". Worcester News. 
  17. ^ Nojan Aminosharei (1 April 2013). "Q&A: Kit Harington". Details. 
  18. ^ Ruben V. Nepales. "‘Thrones’ star bulked up, then slimmed down for film role". 7 February 2014. 
  19. ^ "Kit Harington". Royal National Theatre. August 2008. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  20. ^ Tara Abell (30 March 2012). "Game of Thrones Star Kit Harington Loves Iceland, Fears Flying". The Daily Traveller. 
  21. ^ a b "Kit Harington Biography". TV Guide. Retrieved 2014-07-13. 
  22. ^ a b "Kit Harington - Biography". IMDb. 2014. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  23. ^ "Exclusive interview with Kit Harington". myfanbase.de. 2013. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  24. ^ "'Game of Thrones' Kit Harington (Jon Snow): My big break". OnTheRedCarpet.com. 2013-08-02. Retrieved 2014-07-13. 
  25. ^ Harmanian, Harout (2012-06-20). "'How to Train Your Dragon 2' Gets Kit Harington". MovieWeb. Retrieved 2014-07-13. 
  26. ^ "Seventh Son (2015)". IMDb. 2014. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  27. ^ "‘Game Of Thrones’ Star Joins Jessica Chastain In Xavier Dolan Celebrity Satire". Deadline.com. 2014-12-04. 
  28. ^ "7 Days In Hell (2015)". IMDb. 2015. Retrieved 2015-04-08. 
  29. ^ Staff writer (2 July 2009). "Theatre Interview with Kit Harington — The 22-Year-Old Stars in War Horse at the New London Theatre". The London Paper. Retrieved 20 January 2010. 
  30. ^ "Kit Harington". London Theatre Database. Retrieved 20 January 2010. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]