Kittrell, North Carolina

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kittrell, North Carolina
Township
Location of Kittrell, North Carolina
Location of Kittrell, North Carolina
Coordinates: 36°13′19″N 78°26′28″W / 36.22194°N 78.44111°W / 36.22194; -78.44111Coordinates: 36°13′19″N 78°26′28″W / 36.22194°N 78.44111°W / 36.22194; -78.44111
Country United States
State North Carolina
County Vance
Area
 • Total 0.2 sq mi (0.5 km2)
 • Land 0.2 sq mi (0.5 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 440 ft (134 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 467
 • Estimate (2016)[1] 163
 • Density 2,300/sq mi (930/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 27544
Area code(s) 252
FIPS code 37-36020[2]
GNIS feature ID 1021058[3]

Kittrell is a village in Vance County, North Carolina, United States.

History[edit]

Kittrell was chartered in 1885, with its first mayor David Outlaw, a merchant and bachelor. In 1860, one census district in Granville County the primary of the three parent counties (73% of the land area of Vance County was taken from Granville County) of Vance County, was called Kittrell's Depot. Kittrell's Depot was a railroad depot named for George Kittrell and his wife, Elizabeth Boswell Kittrell, who donated the land for a Raleigh and Gaston Railroad station. The first post office for the Kittrell area, with Elisha Overton as its first postmaster, was established in 1854, replacing one in neighboring Stanton in the Epping Forest area which lacked direct railroad access, this establishment occurring shortly after Kittrell's Depot became operational. An 1868 state law required county governments to divide counties into smaller units of townships. Kittrell Township, including the depot station that is the likely basis for the choice of name, was one of Granville County's creations. George Kittrell was a grandson of Captain Jonathan Kittrell, commander of a company of Granville County colonial militia during the 1760s and early 1770s, and was a large landholder in Granville County. His holdings included the land upon which the Kittrell Springs Hotel was located. His grandfather Captain Kittrell was also one of the justices (or magistrates) for this county, and was an early Granville pioneer, who immigrated as a young adult to that area, attracted by its cheap, abundant and readily available land, along with two younger brothers Samuel and Isaac, from northeastern North Carolina. Their elder brothers George and John remained in their home area on farms in what is now known as Bertie and Gates County. The population was 467 at the 2010 census. The smallest horse in the world lives here measuring 47 cm (18.75 in).

Kittrell was the location of Kittrell College, the campus of which later became the Kittrell Job Corps Center. At Kittrell Job Corps Center, students will receive the skills that are necessary for them to succeed in the workforce.

Ashburn Hall, Thomas Capehart House, Josiah Crudup House, and St. James Episcopal Church and Rectory are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[4]

Geography[edit]

Kittrell is located at 36°13′19″N 78°26′28″W / 36.22194°N 78.44111°W / 36.22194; -78.44111 (36.222049, -78.441184).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2), all of it land.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 317
1900 168 −47.0%
1910 242 44.0%
1920 223 −7.9%
1930 220 −1.3%
1940 184 −16.4%
1950 189 2.7%
1960 121 −36.0%
1970 427 252.9%
1980 225 −47.3%
1990 228 1.3%
2000 148 −35.1%
2010 467 215.5%
Est. 2016 163 [1] −65.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 148 people, 59 households, and 47 families residing in the village. The population density was 711.5 people per square mile (272.1/km²). There were 68 housing units at an average density of 326.9 per square mile (125.0/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 70.95% White, 27.70% African American, 0.68% Asian, and 0.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.70% of the population.

There were 59 households out of which 27.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.5% were married couples living together, 25.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.3% were non-families. 18.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 2.79.

In the township the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 22.3% from 45 to 64, and 20.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 89.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.0 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $41,250, and the median income for a family was $48,125. Males had a median income of $35,000 versus $23,750 for females. The per capita income for the village was $17,799. There were 7.3% of families and 8.3% of the population living below the poverty line, including 26.9% of under eighteens and none of those over 64.

The township is currently governed by three council members led by a mayor. The current mayor is Jerry Joyner elected in November 2009.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.