Myōbudani Kiyoshi

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Myōbudani Kiyoshi
明武谷 清
Myobudani 1959 Scan10016.JPG
Personal information
Born Myōbudani Kiyoshi
(1937-04-29) April 29, 1937 (age 80)
Akan, Hokkaidō, Japan
Height 1.89 m (6 ft 2 12 in)
Weight 113 kg (249 lb; 17.8 st)
Career
Stable Miyagino
Record 624-580-6
Debut March 1954
Highest rank Sekiwake (November 1964)
Retired November 1969
Championships 1 (Jonidan)
Special Prizes Outstanding Performance (4)
Fighting Spirit (4)
Gold Stars 3
Taihō (2)
Sadanoyama
* Up to date as of August 2009.

Myōbudani Kiyoshi (明歩谷 清, born 29 April 1937) is a former sumo wrestler from Akan, Hokkaidō, Japan. He was a member of Miyagino stable. His highest rank was sekiwake and he twice took part in playoffs for the top makuuchi division tournament championship or yūshō. He was also a runner-up in two other tournaments. He earned eight sanshō or special prizes for his achievements in tournaments, four for Outstanding Performance and four for Fighting Spirit. He also earned three kinboshi or gold stars for defeating yokozuna. After his retirement in 1969 he was an elder of the Japan Sumo Association but left the sumo world in 1977 to become a Jehovah's Witness.

Career[edit]

He came from a family of farmers in Akan, Hokkaido. Already 1.76 m (5 ft 9 12 in) tall by the sixth grade of elementary school he was strong enough to help with the family business, but he had ambitions to become a sumo wrestler. In 1953 the yokozuna Haguroyama and Yoshibayama visited the area, and he decided to join Yoshibayama's Takashima stable. He made his professional debut in March 1954. When Yoshibayama set up his own stable whilst still active, Myōbudani went with him, and this stable later evolved into Miyagino stable after Yoshibayama's retirement. He reached the jūryō division in November 1957 and was promoted to the top makuuchi division in July 1959. He initially struggled at this level, being demoted back to jūryō a couple of times and not making a kachi-koshi or majority of wins against losses in makuuchi until November 1960, when he made an effort to be more aggressive on the dohyō.

In September 1961 he was a runner-up in a top division tournament for the first time, taking part in an unusual three-way playoff for the yūshō or championship against Kashiwado and Taihō, with Taihō emerging as the winner. After this tournament he was promoted to the sanyaku ranks for the first time at komusubi, although he was unable to maintain the rank. His fighting name or shikona had always been his own surname in combination with a variety of given names, but he changed it to Yoshibanada in January 1963 in honour of his stablemaster Yoshibayama. The change proved unsuccessful and he reverted back to Myōbudani after only four tournaments. He earned his first kinboshi or win over a yokozuna as a maegashira in May 1964, and reached sekiwake in November 1964. After winning a sansho or special prize in four consecutive tournaments from July 1964 to January 1965 there was speculation that he could reach ozeki, but it was not to be. Nonetheless he was runner-up in May 1965, and took part in another playoff, against Kashiwado in September 1965. He made his last sanyaku appearance in July 1967, and was a runner-up for the fourth and final time in September 1968. His overall top division record was 414 wins against 450 losses with 6 absences, a winning percentage of 48%.

Retirement from sumo[edit]

He retired in November 1969, and became a toshiyori or elder of the Japan Sumo Association, under the name Nakamura. He worked as a coach at Miyagino stable and was also a judge of tournament bouts. He left the Sumo Association in 1977. In the same year, influenced by his wife he became a Jehovah's Witness, whose teachings forbid the practice of martial arts. He moved to Funabashi, Chiba and conducted missionary work while also employed at a building cleaning service. His biography can be found in the magazine Awake!, 8 November 1981.

Fighting style[edit]

Although Myōbudani was of relatively light weight for a sumo wrestler, he was tall and powerful, his speciality being tsuri-dashi or lift out.[1] He used this kimarite more than any other, followed by yori-kiri (force out) and utchari (ring edge throw). His slim, muscular build meant he was popular with female fans.

Career record[edit]

  • The Kyushu tournament was first held in 1957, and the Nagoya tournament in 1958.
Myōbudani Kiyoshi[2]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1954 x Shinjo
3–0
 
East Jonidan #52
3–5
 
Not held West Jonidan #54
6–2
 
Not held
1955 West Jonidan #21
3–5
 
East Jonidan #25
8–0–P
Champion

 
West Sandanme #47
5–3
 
Not held East Sandanme #25
5–3
 
Not held
1956 West Sandanme #7
7–1
 
East Makushita #49
5–3
 
East Makushita #42
6–2
 
Not held East Makushita #32
6–2
 
Not held
1957 East Makushita #20
4–4
 
East Makushita #19
5–3
 
East Makushita #13
6–2
 
Not held East Makushita #3
5–3
 
West Jūryō #23
8–7
 
1958 West Jūryō #22
9–6
 
East Jūryō #17
7–8
 
West Jūryō #18
11–4–P
 
East Jūryō #8
8–7
 
West Jūryō #6
8–7
 
East Jūryō #6
6–9
 
1959 East Jūryō #9
9–6
 
East Jūryō #6
11–4
 
East Jūryō #3
10–5
 
West Maegashira #18
7–8
 
West Jūryō #2
12–3
 
East Maegashira #12
6–9
 
1960 East Maegashira #15
5–10
 
East Jūryō #2
6–9
 
West Jūryō #4
9–6
 
West Jūryō #1
9–6
 
West Jūryō #1
10–5
 
East Maegashira #13
8–7
 
1961 East Maegashira #10
8–7
 
East Maegashira #5
5–10
 
East Maegashira #9
7–8
 
West Maegashira #10
9–6
 
West Maegashira #4
12–3–PP
F
West Komusubi #2
6–9
 
1962 East Maegashira #4
6–9
 
East Maegashira #8
7–8
 
East Maegashira #7
9–6
 
East Maegashira #3
2–13
 
West Maegashira #9
8–7
 
West Maegashira #7
11–4
 
1963 East Maegashira #1
5–10
 
West Maegashira #3
5–10
 
West Maegashira #6
5–10
 
West Maegashira #11
9–6
 
West Maegashira #6
8–7
 
West Maegashira #3
7–8
 
1964 West Maegashira #4
8–7
 
West Komusubi #1
7–8
 
West Maegashira #1
7–8
West Maegashira #1
8–7
O
East Maegashira #1
8–7
F
East Sekiwake #1
8–7
O
1965 East Sekiwake #1
9–6
O
East Sekiwake #1
4–11
 
East Maegashira #4
11–4
 
East Komusubi #1
4–11
 
East Maegashira #5
12–3–P
F
West Komusubi #2
9–6
O
1966 West Komusubi #1
9–6
 
West Sekiwake #1
7–8
 
West Komusubi #1
6–9
 
West Maegashira #2
5–10
 
East Maegashira #5
5–10
 
East Maegashira #8
8–7
 
1967 West Maegashira #4
11–4
F
East Komusubi #1
9–6
 
East Sekiwake #1
7–8
 
East Komusubi #2
7–8
 
West Maegashira #1
7–8
 
West Maegashira #1
5–10
1968 East Maegashira #6
7–8
 
West Maegashira #7
8–7
 
West Maegashira #4
9–6
 
East Maegashira #2
4–8–3
 
East Maegashira #7
11–4
 
East Maegashira #2
5–10
 
1969 West Maegashira #5
6–9
 
East Maegashira #7
5–10
 
West Maegashira #11
9–6
 
East Maegashira #7
7–8
 
East Maegashira #8
7–8
 
West Maegashira #9
Retired
0–12–3
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schreiber, Mark (18 September 2017). "Sumo helps with heavy lifting in language". Japan Times. Retrieved 21 September 2017. 
  2. ^ "Myōbudani Kiyoshi Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-09-05.