List of generation VI Pokémon

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This article only covers the basics of Pokémon species. For detailed in-universe information, please refer to dedicated wikis on the subject.
The international logo for the Pokémon franchise

The sixth-generation (Generation VI) of the Pokémon franchise features the addition of 72 fictional species of creatures in Pokémon X and Y to the series. Also included are additions from Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. This generation featured the series' largest graphical overhaul: a shift from two-dimensional sprites to three-dimensional polygons. A new type (Fairy) was introduced for the first time since Gold and Silver in 1999, bringing the total to 18. Greater emphasis was placed on making Pokémon species more unique and in-tune with the culture and fauna of Europe, namely France.

All Pokémon were created by a team of roughly 20 artists, led by Ken Sugimori and Hironobu Yoshida. For the first time in the franchise, the generation's Legendary Pokémon—specifically Xerneas and Yveltal—were not designed by Sugimori alone; he requested the help of Atsuko Nishida to move their designs forward.[1]

The following list details the 72 Pokémon of Generation VI in order of their National Pokédex—an in-game electronic encyclopedia that provides various information on Pokémon—number. The first Pokémon, Chespin, is number 650 and the last, Volcanion, is number 721. Alternate forms that result in type changes and Mega Evolutions are included for convenience.

Design and development[edit]

Development of Pokémon X and Y began in 2010, and the games were released worldwide on October 12, 2013.[2] Director Junichi Masuda revealed that the three main themes of Pokémon X and Y to be beauty, bonds, and evolution.[3] Beauty was the core focus and Masuda felt France to be a prime example of such; he brought a team to the country for study in 2011.[4] With the games taking place in a region based on France (called Kalos), design inspiration stemmed more from European culture.[1] The legendary trio of Xerneas, Yveltal, and Zygarde have their roots in Norse Mythology, for example.[5] More focus than usual was placed on giving new Pokémon unique elements for this generation.[2]

A major design change for the franchise was the shift from two-dimensional sprites to three-dimensional polygons. This required a larger development team than past games, with more than 500 people involved with the games' development, inclusive of localization teams.[6] Emphasis was placed on retaining the iconic style of Pokémon art director Ken Sugimori who has been designing Pokémon and creating the franchise's official artwork since Red and Green in 1996.[7][8] A new type was also added into the game for the first time since Gold and Silver in 1999: Fairy-type. This was to serve as a counter to the overpowered Dragon-type and balance out the metagame. Multiple Pokémon from previous generations, such as Jigglypuff, Gardevoir, and Marill, were retroactively assigned the new type while 13 new Pokémon, most notably Sylveon, donned the type.[9] A new mechanic called Mega Evolution—a temporary form change akin to normal evolution—was also added for more dynamic battles and stemmed from the concepts of bonds and evolution.[2][3] Mega Evolutions "refined designs to a new extreme" according to Yoshida, and required considerable effort.[2] They were made temporary to retain balance in battles, and only made possible when a Pokémon is holding their respective Mega Stone to prevent players from giving them a different advantageous hold item.[2] The only Pokémon from Generation VI capable of Mega Evolution is Diancie.

The titles X and Y, representing the x-axis and y-axis—also reflecting different forms of thinking[10]—were chosen early in development.[6] The simplicity of the names was also related to the simultaneous worldwide release of the games.[10] Additionally, designers sought to make the Pokémon names the same in every country whenever possible. Masuda expressed that this effort proved exceptionally difficult as the names have to feel fitting to their physical appearance and not infringe upon any rights.[11]

At the request of Masuda,[10] the shapes "X" and "Y" were used as the framework for the boxart legendary Pokémon: Xernas and Yveltal.[6] Normally, Sugimori designs the legendary Pokémon by himself; however, he required assistance from designer Atsuko Nishida to create Xerneas and Yveltal.[1] Finalization of their designs took about 18 months, 3 times longer than normal.[12] Manga artist Hitoshi Ariga was requested to assist in creating Pokémon for X and Y; Ariga ultimately designed ten species for the games.[13] It is speculated by fans that the designs for the Chespin, Fennekin, and Froakie evolutionary lines stem from typical role-playing game character classes, such as those in Final Fantasy. Chespin represents the knight, paladin, and fighter classes; Fennekin represents the witch, mage, and magician classes; and Froakie represents the thief and rogue classes.[14]

List of Pokémon[edit]

List of Pokémon species introduced in Generation VI (2013)[nb 1]
Name National Pokédex
number
Type(s) Evolves into Notes
English Japanese Primary Secondary
Chespin Harimaron[16] 650 Grass Quilladin (#651) Chespin are small creatures that can harden the quills on their head to smash rocks.[17] Its design is based on a chestnut and a chipmunk.[18]
Quilladin Hariborg[19] 651 Grass Chesnaught (#652) Quilladin are a kind species that features tough shell of armor.[20][21] Upon Quilladin's reveal prior to the release of X and Y, fans expressed distaste over its wrecking ball-like design.[14] Its design has elements of a pine cone and squirrel.[18]
Chesnaught Brigarron[22] 652 Grass Fighting Does not evolve Chesnaught are powerful, hedgehog Pokémon capable of moving tanks and withstanding explosions.[23][24]
Fennekin Fokko[25] 653 Fire Braixen (#654) Fennekin are fox-like Pokémon whose ears can heat the air to 200 °C (390 °F).[26] Its design is based on the fennec fox.[18]
Braixen Tairenar[19] 654 Fire Delphox (#655) Braixen are fox-like Pokémon that use a flaming twig, stored in their tail fur, to battle.[27] Its English name is a portmanteau of braise and vixen.[14]
Delphox Mahoxy[28] 655 Fire Psychic Does not evolve Delphox are fox-like Pokémon with psychic abilities capable of creating 3,000 °C (5,400 °F) flames.[29]
Froakie Keromatsu[30] 656 Water Frogadier (#657) Froakie are frog-like Pokémon that can secrete defensive bubbles from their back and neck.[31]
Frogadier Gekogashira[19] 657 Water Geninja (#658) Frogadier are agile frog-like Pokémon said to be capable of climbing a 610 m (2,000 ft) building in a minute.[32] Its English name is a portmanteau of frog and brigadier.[14]
Greninja Gekkouga[22] 658 Water Dark Does not evolve A ninja frog Pokémon, Greninja are able to create shurikens from water that can slice metal.[33] A unique "Ash-Greninja" form is featured in the anime series.[34] Greninja's design has been well-received by fans and critics alike.[18][35]
Bunnelby Horubee[22] 659 Normal Diggersby (#660) Bunnelby are rabbit-like Pokémon that use their large ears as shovels to dig burrows.[36] Bunnelby's design is inspired by the local wildlife of France.[1]
Diggersby Horudo[19] 660 Normal Ground Does not evolve A rabbit-like Pokémon, Diggersby are said to be as powerful as an excavator and can lift boulders weighing one ton with its ears.[37]
Fletchling Yayakoma[38] 661 Normal Flying Fletchinder (#662) Fletchling are small robin Pokémon that are known for being both friendly and fiercely territorial.[39][40] Fletchling is the standard early-game flying-type Pokémon.[18]
Fletchinder Hinoyakoma[19] 662 Fire Flying Talonflame (#663) Fletchinder have a flame sac on their undersides that, when heated, allow them to fly faster.[41]
Talonflame Fiarrow[19] 663 Fire Flying Does not evolve Talonflame can fly at speeds of 500 km/h (310 mph) while attacking prey.[42]
Scatterbug Kofukimushi[19] 664 Bug Spewpa (#665) Scatterbug cover themselves in protective powder that allow them to survive in any climate.[43]
Spewpa Kofuurai[19] 665 Bug Vivillon (#666) A meek Pokémon, Spewpa live in the shadows and have strong bodies.[44][45]
Vivillon Viviyon[22] 666 Bug Flying Does not evolve Vivillon's wings feature 18 different patterns that are dependent upon the player's real-world location (determined by their user settings on the Nintendo 3DS).[46] A special Poké Ball pattern Vivillon was released at the Pokémon Center in Paris on June 4, 2014,[47] and then worldwide on August 6, 2014, in commemoration of the launch of the franchise's online store.[48] The 20th pattern was released on July 7, 2014, as a commemoration for 100 million trades through the game's Global Trade System (GTS).[49]
Litleo Shishiko[50] 667 Fire Normal Pyroar (#668)
Pyroar Kaenjishi[19] 668 Fire Normal Does not evolve Male Pyroar feature a large lion's mane, while female Pyroar have a long ponytail mane.[14] Regarded as "majestic" and "bad-ass", Pyroar's design, particularly the male variant, has been well-received.[18]
Flabébé Flabebe[51] 669 Fairy Floette (#670) Flabébé are tiny—only 10 cm (4 in) tall—carefree, humanoid Pokémon that cling to a flower for their whole life.[18][52]
Floette Floette[53] 670 Fairy Florges (#671)
Florges Florges[54] 671 Fairy Does not evolve
Skiddo Meecle[22] 672 Grass Gogoat (#673)
Gogoat Gogoat[55] 673 Grass Does not evolve A goat Pokémon covered in grass that can be mounted for travel.[18]
Pancham Yancham[56] 674 Fighting Pangoro (#675) Pancham's design is heavily based on pandas.[18]
Pangoro Goronda[19] 675 Fighting Dark Does not evolve Pangoro was designed by Hitoshi Ariga.[13]
Furfrou Trimmien[22] 676 Normal Does not evolve Furfrou are poodle Pokémon.[14]
Espurr Nyasper[22] 677 Psychic Meowstic (#678)
Meowstic Nyaonix[22] 678 Psychic Does not evolve
Honedge Hitotsuki[57] 679 Steel Ghost Doublade (#680) Honedge was designed by Hitoshi Ariga.[13]
Doublade Nidangill[19] 680 Steel Ghost Aegislash (#681) Doublade was designed by Hitoshi Ariga.[13]
Aegislash Gillgard[19] 681 Steel Ghost Does not evolve Aegislash was designed by Hitoshi Ariga.[13]
Spritzee Shushupu[19] 682 Fairy Aromatisse (#683)
Aromatisse Frefuwan[58] 683 Fairy Does not evolve GamesRadar has described Aromatissee as "a weird hybrid of Jynx and Jigglypuff."[18]
Swirlix Peroppafu[55] 684 Fairy Slurpuff (#685)
Slurpuff Peroream[59] 685 Fairy Does not evolve
Inkay Maaiika[22] 686 Dark Psychic Malamar (#687) Inkay was designed by Hitoshi Ariga.[13]
Malamar Calamanero[19] 687 Dark Psychic Does not evolve Malamar was designed by Hitoshi Ariga.[13] Malamar requires a unique condition for it to evolve from Inkay: the player must turn their 3DS upside down when Inkay reaches level 30.[18]
Binacle Kametete[19] 688 Rock Water Barbaracle (#689)
Barbaracle Gamenodes[19] 689 Rock Water Does not evolve
Skrelp Kuzumo[22] 690 Poison Water Dragalge (#691) Skrelp's design is based on the leafy seadragon.[60]
Dragalge Dramidoro[19] 691 Poison Dragon Does not evolve
Clauncher Udeppou[22] 692 Water Clawitzer (#693)
Clawitzer Bloster[19] 693 Water Does not evolve
Helioptile Erikiteru[61] 694 Electric Normal Heliolisk (#695)
Heliolisk Elezard[19] 695 Electric Normal Does not evolve
Tyrunt Chigoras[62] 696 Rock Dragon Tyrantrum (#697) Tyrunt and Tyrantrum were designed by Hitoshi Ariga.[13] Their designs are based on Tyrannosaurus rex.[14]
Tyrantrum Gachigoras[63] 697 Rock Dragon Does not evolve
Amaura Amarus[64] 698 Rock Ice Aurorus (#699) Amaura and Aurorus were designed by Hitoshi Ariga.[13] Their design draws inspiration from the Amargasaurus, which had a row of spines extending down its neck.[14]
Aurorus Amaruruga[65] 699 Rock Ice Does not evolve
Sylveon Nymphia[66] 700 Fairy Does not evolve A pink Pokémon adorned with ribbons and butterfly-like bows,[67] Sylveon use their ribbon-like feelers to soothe trainers and Pokémon alike.[68] It is the eighth branching evolution to Generation I's Eevee. It was revealed on February 14, 2013, before the official announcement of Fairy-type.[67] Sylveon was designed by Atsuko Nishida.[69]
Hawlucha Luchabull[70] 701 Fighting Flying Does not evolve Hawlucha's design is inspired by Mexican luchadors. Its design has received praise for being creative.[18][71]
Dedenne Dedenne[22] 702 Electric Fairy Does not evolve
Carbink Melecie[72] 703 Rock Fairy Does not evolve Although Carbink does not evolve in-game, the species canonically can transform into Diancie (#719) under certain, unspecified circumstances.[73]
Goomy Numera[74] 704 Dragon Sliggoo (#705) Goomy's "goofy" design earned it unusual popularity and spawned a meme: "The Church of Goomy".[71][75] It is considered among the cuter, though in an eccentric manner, Pokémon introduced in Generation VI.[76]
Sliggoo Numeil[19] 705 Dragon Goodra (#706)
Goodra Numelgon[77] 706 Dragon Does not evolve
Klefki Cleffy[78] 707 Steel Fairy Does not evolve Klefki was designed by Pokémon graphic designer Mana Ibe and inspired by "old mansions and secret keys".[79] It may also be at least partially inspired by the Japanese yōkai Tsukumogami, household objects that gain souls.[71] Video game journalists regarded its design as among the worst of new Pokémon introduced in X and Y,[71][80] and characterized the design as uninspired, insipid, strange, and an example of Game Freak's "creative bankruptcy".[81][82][83]
Phantump Bokurei[84] 708 Ghost Grass Trevenant (#709)
Trevenant Ohrot[19] 709 Ghost Grass Does not evolve
Pumpkaboo Bakeccha[22] 710 Ghost Grass Gourgeist (#711)
Gourgeist Pumpjin[19] 711 Ghost Grass Does not evolve
Bergmite Kachikohru[85] 712 Ice Avalugg (#713)
Avalugg Crebase[19] 713 Ice Does not evolve
Noibat Onbat[86] 714 Flying Dragon Noivern (#715)
Noivern Onvern[87] 715 Flying Dragon Does not evolve Its English name is a portmanteau of noisy and wyvern, the latter of which is the inspiration for Noivern's design.[18]
Xerneas Xerneas[88] 716 Fairy Does not evolve The game mascot of Pokémon X, Xerneas represents eternity and is said to grace other beings with eternal life.[8][89] Xerneas' design is inspired by the Eikþyrnir of Norse mythology, a stag that stands atop Valhalla.[5]
Yveltal Yveltal[90] 717 Dark Flying Does not evolve The game mascot of Pokémon Y, Yveltal is a creature of destruction capable of absorbing the life energy of other living beings.[8][91] Yveltal's design is inspired by the Hræsvelgr of Norse mythology, a giant eagle able to make the wind blow by flapping its wings.[5]
Zygarde Zygarde[19] 718 Dragon Ground Does not evolve Zygarde's design is inspired by the Níðhöggr of Norse mythology, a dragon that eats away at the roots of the world tree, Yggdrasil.[5] Zygarde normally appears as two blob-like Zygarde Cores, which individually absorb the immobile Zygarde Cells to assume the dog-like 10% Power or base 50% Power form. But the two Zygarde Cores can also combine together with every Zygarde Cell to assume their humanoid Perfect or Complete form.[34][92]
Diancie Diancie[93] 719 Rock Fairy Mega Evolution Said to be "the loveliest sight in the whole world,"[73] Diancie are capable of creating diamonds at will. A Mythical Pokémon, Diancie is not readily found in-game and is only available through Nintendo distributions.[94] It was originally discovered by hackers on October 26, 2013,[95] and not officially revealed by Game Freak until February 11, 2014.[96]
Mega Diancie Mega Diancie[97] Rock Fairy Does not evolve Referred to as the "Royal Princess", the diamond atop Mega Diancie's head is said to be 2,000 carats. It was revealed on June 12, 2014, and is not available in X and Y.[98][99]
Hoopa Hoopa[19] 720 Psychic Ghost Does not evolve "Hoopa Confined"[100] are small, mischievous Pokémon that are capable warping space and time.[101] A Mythical Pokémon, Hoopa is not readily found in-game and is only available through Nintendo distributions.[102] It was originally discovered by hackers on October 26, 2013,[95] and not officially revealed by Game Freak until January 11, 2015.[103]
Psychic Dark Using the Prison Bottle item, Confined Hoopa can transform into a considerably larger and more powerful form called "Hoopa Unbound".[100] Known as the Djinn Pokémon, it is capable of seizing any object in the world and can teleport anything through space and time.[104][105]
Volcanion Volcanion[106] 721 Fire Water Does not evolve A unique dual Fire- and Water-type Pokémon, Volcanion are able to create scalding steam within their body and expel it with enough force to destroy mountains.[107] A Mythical Pokémon, Volcanion is not readily found in-game and is only available through Nintendo distributions. It was originally discovered by hackers on October 26, 2013,[95] and not officially revealed by Game Freak until December 14, 2015.[107]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Details on Pokémon names, National Pokédex numbers, types, and evolutions are obtained from The Pokémon Company International's online Pokédex.[15]

References[edit]

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  21. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon Y. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Quilladin Pokédex entry: 'They strengthen their lower bodies by running into one another. They are very kind and won't start fights.' 
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  24. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon Y. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Chesnaught Pokédex entry: 'When it takes a defensive posture with its fists guarding its face, it could withstand a bomb blast.' 
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  26. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon X. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Fennekin Pokédex entry: 'Eating a twig fills it with energy, and its roomy ears give vent to air hotter than 390 degrees Fahrenheit.' 
  27. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon X. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Braixen Pokédex entry: 'It has a twig stuck in its tail. With friction from its tail fur, it sets the twig on fire and launches into battle.' 
  28. ^ "Mahoxy with You". Pokémon with You. Retrieved 19 Oct 2014. 
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  31. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon X. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Froakie Pokédex entry: 'It secretes flexible bubbles from its chest and back. The bubbles reduce the damage it would otherwise take when attacked.' 
  32. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon Y. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Frogadier Pokédex entry: 'Its swiftness is unparalleled. It can scale a tower of more than 2,000 feet in a minute's time.' 
  33. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon X. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Greninja Pokédex entry: 'It creates throwing stars out of compressed water. When it spins them and throws them at high speed, these stars can split metal in two.' 
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  37. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon X. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Diggersby Pokédex entry: 'With their powerful ears, they can heft boulders of a ton or more with ease. They can be a big help at construction sites.' 
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  40. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon Y. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Fletchling Pokédex entry: 'Despite the beauty of its lilting voice, it's merciless to intruders that enter its territory.' 
  41. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon Y. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Fletchinder Pokédex entry: 'The hotter the flame sac on its belly, the faster it can fly, but it takes some time to get the fire going.' 
  42. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon Y. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Talonflame Pokédex entry: 'When attacking prey, it can reach speeds of up to 310 mph. It finishes its prey off with a colossal kick.' 
  43. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon Y. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Scatterbug Pokédex entry: 'The powder that covers its body regulates its temperature, so it can live in any region or climate.' 
  44. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon X. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Spewpa Pokédex entry: 'It lives hidden within thicket shadows. When predators attack, it quickly bristles the fur covering its body in an effort to threaten them.' 
  45. ^ Game Freak (April 22, 2015). Pokémon Y. Nintendo 3DS. The Pokémon Company. Spewpa Pokédex entry: 'The beaks of birds can't begin to scratch its stalwart body. To defend itself, it spews powder.' 
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