Knight Science Journalism Fellowships

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Logo, Knight Science Journalism Program at MIT

The Knight Science Journalism Fellowship Program[1] (KSJ@MIT) offers 9-month research fellowships, based at its headquarters at the MIT School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, to elite staff and freelance journalists specializing in coverage of science and technology, medicine, or the environment. Fellows are chosen from an international application pool in a competitive process each spring, and reside in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for two semesters of audited coursework and research at MIT, Harvard, and surrounding institutions.

The program is currently directed by Pulitzer Prize-winning science journalist Deborah Blum.[1]

Since its founding, KSJ@MIT has hosted more than 300 fellows from a wide range of national and international publications, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Time, Scientific American, Science, the Associated Press, ABC News, and CNN.[2]

Eligible applicants can work for print, broadcast or the web as reporters, writers, editors, or producers.[3]

In 2016, the program launched an editorially independent digital science magazine called Undark.[4]

History[edit]

KSJ@MIT was launched in 1983 under the guidance of founding director, Victor McElheny.[5] It is administratively a part of the Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) located in the MIT School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences.[6] The program and its activities is primarily funded by an endowment from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Additional funding has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the Kavli Foundation.[7]

The nine-month program is designed to offer selected fellows a year away from deadlines to pursue intellectual enrichment, develop new sources, and explore aspects of science and its interaction with economic, political, and cultural forces that would ordinarily be out of reach for a working science journalist. Fellows typically audit courses on a non-graded, non-credit basis at MIT and Harvard University, as well as numerous other institutions in the Boston/Cambridge area, including Boston University, Tufts, Northeastern University, and Brandeis University.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Pulitzer Prize-winner to head Knight Science Journalism at MIT". MIT News. Retrieved 2018-05-02.
  2. ^ "History and Founding of KSJ@MIT - Knight Science Journalism @MIT". Knight Science Journalism @MIT. Retrieved 2018-05-02.
  3. ^ "Fellowship Application Basics - Knight Science Journalism @MIT". Knight Science Journalism @MIT. Retrieved 2018-05-02.
  4. ^ "Can Undark go where no other online science mag has gone before?". Columbia Journalism Review. Retrieved 2018-05-02.
  5. ^ "History and Founding of KSJ@MIT - Knight Science Journalism @MIT". Knight Science Journalism @MIT. Retrieved 2018-05-02.
  6. ^ "Home - MIT STS". MIT STS. Retrieved 2018-05-02.
  7. ^ "History and Founding of KSJ@MIT - Knight Science Journalism @MIT". Knight Science Journalism @MIT. Retrieved 2018-05-02.
  8. ^ "The 9-Month Fellowship - Knight Science Journalism @MIT". Knight Science Journalism @MIT. Retrieved 2018-05-02.

External links[edit]