Knights of Pythias Lodge Hall (Weiser, Idaho)

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Knights of Pythias Lodge Hall
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS LODGE HALL.jpg
Knights of Pythias Lodge Hall (Weiser, Idaho) is located in Idaho
Knights of Pythias Lodge Hall (Weiser, Idaho)
Knights of Pythias Lodge Hall (Weiser, Idaho) is located in the US
Knights of Pythias Lodge Hall (Weiser, Idaho)
Location 30 E. Idaho St., Weiser, Idaho
Coordinates 44°14′44″N 116°58′11″W / 44.245497°N 116.969747°W / 44.245497; -116.969747Coordinates: 44°14′44″N 116°58′11″W / 44.245497°N 116.969747°W / 44.245497; -116.969747
Area less than one acre
Built 1904
Architect Tourtellotte & Co.
NRHP reference # 76000683[1]
Added to NRHP May 13, 1976

The Knights of Pythias Lodge Hall, also known as Pythian Castle, in Weiser, Idaho is a building built in 1904. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.[1]

The Pythian Castle was originally owned and commissioned by The Order of Knights of Pythias- an international, non-sectarian fraternal order, established in 1864. The building was designed by Boise, Idaho Architectural firm Tourtellotte & Hummel Company. The cut stone for the front was supplied by Roberts and Sheff and quarried at Sand Hollow, near Weiser. The masonry work was completed by Hamilton and Reader Masonries of Weiser, Idaho. Each stone was transferred to the site and hand cut to fit. The degree in craftsmanship is displayed in the detail of the medieval styling, and intricate stained glass windows. The symmetrical cut-stone structure faces south. Two plate-glass windows make up the first floor, with a glass door at the eastern corner. Three cut-stone columns break up the first story's facade and culminate in Romanesque arches over the plate glass windows. A stone band separates the first and second stories. A large, centered window, originally stained glass but now boarded over, dominates the second story. It has a corbelled Tudor arch and is flanked by two double-hung sash windows with small stained glass transoms, also capped by Tudor arches. Four cylindrical pilasters extend the length of the second story. The two interior pilasters extend the length of the second story. The two interior pilasters are wider and terminate as miniature towers with flagstaffs. The entire building is surmounted by crenellated battlements. In 1982 the building came into ownership of the Weiser Architectural Preservation Committee and remains as a historical monument in the City of Weiser, Idaho. Period of Significance: 1875-1899, 1900-1924 Location: 30 E. Idaho St., Weiser, Idaho 83672

References[edit]

[2] [3]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ http://www.idl.idaho.gov
  3. ^ http://www.idahoheritage.org