Knox H. White

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Knox H. White
34th Mayor of Greenville, South Carolina
Assumed office
December 11, 1995
Preceded byBill Workman
At-large member of the Greenville City Council
In office
1983–1993
Preceded byBill Workman
Succeeded byCatherine C. Christophillis
Personal details
Born (1954-01-26) January 26, 1954 (age 65)
Greenville, South Carolina, USA
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Marsha P. White
ChildrenTwo children
ResidenceGreenville, South Carolina
Alma materChrist Church Episcopal School

Greenville Senior High School
Wake Forest University

University of South Carolina School of Law
OccupationLawyer

Knox H. White (born January 26, 1954) is an attorney in his native Greenville, South Carolina, who has served as his city's 34th and current mayor since December 11, 1995, a longer tenure than any other mayor of Greenville.[1] Previously, he was from 1983 to 1993 an at-large member of the Greenville City Council. He won another four-year term in November 2015.[2]

Background[edit]

White graduated from Christ Church Episcopal School, Greenville Senior High School, Wake Forest University in North Carolina, and the University of South Carolina School of Law in the capital city of Columbia.[3] He is a partner in the law firm Haynsworth, Sinkler & Boyd, with his specialization in immigration and customs.[4] He and his wife, Marsha P. White (born c. 1955), have two children.[3]

Political life[edit]

At the age of eighteen, White was an alternate delegate to the 1972 Republican National Convention in Miami Beach, Florida, which re-nominated the Nixon-Agnew ticket. In 1988, at the age of thirty-four, White was the unsuccessful Republican nominee for South Carolina's 4th congressional district seat in the United States House of Representatives. His campaign was determined and well-financed, and backed by Governor Carroll A. Campbell, Jr., who formerly held the House seat himself.[5] He lost narrowly to the Democratic incumbent Liz J. Patterson, the daughter of former U.S. Senator Olin D. Johnston.[6] This came even as George H. W. Bush carried the 4th by a large margin.

Mayoral tenure[edit]

Greenville has operated since 1976 under the city manager form of government, with an elected mayor and six-member city council, four chosen by district and two at-large.[2] White was elected mayor in 1995 and has been reelected every four years since.

Under White's tenure as mayor, Greenville has avoided direct increases in property tax rates and kept its bond rating high. Upon taking office, White announced an overall theme of making Greenville "the most beautiful and livable city in America." Toward this goal, White has pushed for neighborhood and downtown revitalization and like Mayor Workman, an emphasis on economic development.[3]

Greenville during the White administration has removed the Camperdown Bridge and established Falls Park, the birthplace of Greenville. The city restored both Court Street and the Poinsett Hotel, now a Westin facility named for Joel R. Poinsett. A new retail establishment, the Mast General Store, and the baseball stadium Fluor Field have been added to the downtown. There has been development along the Reedy River and the creation of a system of walking and bicycle trails throughout the city. Public art flourishes along Main Street. There have been annexations and improvements in the infrastructure to accommodate the Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research, a part of Clemson University in Clemson.[3]

White has worked to lessen traffic noise, construct more sidewalks, revitalize parks, enhance beautification, and encourage the establishment of neighborhood associations. New housing has been constructed in special-emphasis neighborhoods.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mayors of Greenville, South Carolina". greenvillesc.gov. Archived from the original on May 17, 2014. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Greenville City Council". greenvillesc.gov. Archived from the original on May 17, 2014. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Knox White, Mayor". greenvillesc.gov. Archived from the original on May 17, 2014. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  4. ^ "White, Knox H. - Attorney". yellowpagesgoesgreen.org. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  5. ^ "THE 1988 ELECTIONS: South; SOUTH CAROLINA, November 9, 1988". The New York Times. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  6. ^ "White, Knox H." The Political Graveyard. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
Preceded by
Bill Workman
34th Mayor of Greenville, South Carolina

Knox H. White
1995–

Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Bill Workman
At-large member of the Greenville City Council

Knox H. White
1983–1993

Succeeded by
Catherine C. Christophillis