Koelreuteria elegans

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Koelreuteria elegans
Ke raintree3.jpg
Taiwanese rain tree with fruit
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Sapindales
Family: Sapindaceae
Genus: Koelreuteria
Species:
K. elegans
Binomial name
Koelreuteria elegans
Synonyms

Koelreuteria formosana Hayata
Koelreuteria henryi Dummer

Koelreuteria elegans, more commonly known as flamegold rain tree[1] or Taiwanese rain tree, is a deciduous tree 15–17 metres tall endemic to Taiwan.[2][3][4] It is widely grown throughout the tropics and sub-tropical parts of the world as a street tree.

It flowers in early to mid-summer. Flowers are small, to 20 mm in length, and occur in branched clusters at the stem tips. They are butter-yellow with five petals that vary in length until opening. Each flower contains seven to eight pale yellow stamens with hairy white filaments.

The fruit is a brown-purplish three-lobed capsule that splits to reveal a number of black seeds.

It is a declared weed in many parts of the world, particularly Brisbane, Australia[5] and in Hawaii.

Flowers of K. elegans
Fruit of K. elegans

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Koelreuteria elegans". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  2. ^ Huang, Tseng-chieng, ed. (1996). "Sapindaceae". Flora of Taiwan. 2 (2nd ed.). Taipei, Taiwan: Editorial Committee of the Flora of Taiwan, Second Edition. p. 588. ISBN 957-9019-52-5. Retrieved 30 July 2017.
  3. ^ Nianhe Xia; Paul A. Gadek. "Koelreuteria elegans". Flora of China. Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA. Retrieved 30 July 2017.
  4. ^ K. T. Shao (ed.). "Koelreuteria henryi Dummer, 1912". Catalogue of life in Taiwan. Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. Retrieved 30 July 2017.
  5. ^ "Weed Management Guide: Chinese rain tree – Koelreuteria elegans ssp. formosana" (PDF). CRC for Australian Weed Management. 2003. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-09-01. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)