Kojey Radical

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Kojey Radical
Birth nameKwadwo Adu Genfi Amponsah
Born (1993-01-04) 4 January 1993 (age 25)
OriginHoxton, London
GenresBritish hip hop, Alternative hip hop, Spoken word, Rap
Occupation(s)Musician, Contemporary Artist, Poet, Rapper
Associated acts
Websitesoundcloud.com/kojeyradical

Kwadwo Adu Genfi Amponsah, better known by his stage name Kojey Radical, is a British rapper and mixed media visual artist.[1] He is known for incorporating storytelling and Afrocentric themes. His music has been described as "...somewhere between grime-y hip hop and alternative rap with a generous helping of spoken word."

He is also the creative director of arts collective PushCrayons and artist director of contemporary Menswear brand Chelsea Bravo [2]

Musical career[edit]

Radical was raised in Shoreditch and Hoxton, London, the son of Ghanaian immigrants from Ghana.[3] He began as a spoken word poet and mixed media illustrator, graduating from London College of Fashion with a first BA hons in Fashion Illustration.[4] His passions soon moved into music, releasing his first project Dear Daisy : Opium just after graduating in 2014.[5] Dear Daisy is often referred to[by whom?] as Radical’s first conceptual music project in which he touched on topics of love, social media, religion, etc,[6] spawning from a book with the same name Radical was illustrating during his time at university. Radical linked up with UK artist and producer Jay Prince who produced Radical’s first official record The Garden Party.[7] Radical followed up with a record called "Bambu", which subsequently became the first single on his sophomore EP 23Winters. Bambu made use of blackface, a persona Radical would later adopt in majority of his early visuals.

2015[edit]

After supporting Young Fathers on tour, Radical later released "Open Hand" a record that saw him adopt a much more political stance in his music. premiering the visual at Tate Britain in 2015.[8] Radical aimed to offer an alternative outlook on socio-political issues.[9] He later followed up with a record called "Kwame Nkrumah" before releasing the 23Winters EP in February 2016. "Kwame Nkrumah" was written in honour of the first Ghanian president and Ghana's independence.

The 23Winters EP was a personal analysis of a relationship between father and son, with themes of religion, society, family, love, new-age revolution and African diaspora narrated by Kojey's father.[10] The project includes production from KZ The Producer, Fwdslxsh, Lupus Cain, Selvsse, Niels Kirk & New Machine as well as collaborations from Tom Grenan, Ray Blk & Bobii Lewis. It has been described as "a supreme phonic proclamation of one’s ethnicity, history and future."[citation needed] In an interview with The Source Magazine Radical stated his intention was to "...create a body of work that voices my ideas and philosophies while also offering another sense of perspective... "[10] 23Winters also saw Kojey nominated for two MOBO Awards, one for Best Newcomer and one for Best Video.[11] The project independently debuted at no.3 in the UK Rap & Hip Hop Albums Charts, while simultaneously entering the UK top 40.[12]

2017[edit]

2017 saw Radical return with his longest project to date, In Gods Body.[13] with features from Shola Ama, Ghetts, Tamera Foster, Miloh Smith, Dance music producer Potè, Obongjayar and British actress and screenwriter Michaela Coel who recites a poem written by Kojey that serves as a central narration to the project.[14] The project was a continuation of 23Winters honing in on some of the messages recited by Radical's father and developed into a journey of self discovery. Radical deconstructed the politics of black identity and race while introducing conversations about sexuality and love.[15]

Since the release of 23Winters Radical has toured the world independently playing in Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, South Africa, Russia and much of Europe [16]

His longest lasting brand relationship has been with Adidas.[17] Radical and Adidas teamed up to create a short film about mental health and depression alongside director Max Luz and international fashion platform SSense.

Discography[edit]

Extended plays[edit]

  • Dear Daisy : Opium (2014)
  • 23Winters (2016)
  • In Gods Body (2017)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hutchinson, Kate (2017-08-20). "One to watch: Kojey Radical". The Guardian. Retrieved 2017-12-30.
  2. ^ Dazed (2017-08-31). "Meet Kojey Radical, the rap artist and poet messing with God". Dazed. Retrieved 2017-12-30.
  3. ^ Ekpoudom, Aniefiok (2017-10-24). "Kojey Radical and the Search for Inner Peace". Noisey. Retrieved 2017-12-30.
  4. ^ UAL (2014). "Kojo Amponsah SHOWTIME". UAL. Retrieved 2017-12-30.
  5. ^ "2017 artist to watch: Kojey Radical". Gal Dem. 2016-12-16. Retrieved 2017-12-30.
  6. ^ Wood, Mike (2014-05-11). "Kojey Radical premieres his brilliant new EP 'Dear Daisy : Opium' [Premiere]". Earmilk. Retrieved 2017-12-30.
  7. ^ Weis, Jeff (2017-05-11). "I'm Always Going to do What I Want to do": An Interview with Kojey Radical". PassionWeis. Retrieved 2017-12-30.
  8. ^ "Fresh From Premiering Over at the Tate Britain, Here's Kojey Radical's "Open Hand"". NOISEY. 2015-05-10. Retrieved 2017-12-30.
  9. ^ "Stamp TV: Kojey Radical: An Open Hand Revolution -". 2015-10-19. Retrieved 2018-02-26.
  10. ^ a b "First Listen: Kojey Radical '23Winters' EP | The Source". The Source. 2016-02-23. Retrieved 2018-02-26.
  11. ^ "Meet MOBO Best Newcomer Nominee – Kojey Radical". THELINKUP.COM. Retrieved 2018-02-26.
  12. ^ "Kojey Radical '23 Winters' - EP REVIEW - GIGsoup". GIGsoup. 2016-03-16. Retrieved 2018-02-26.
  13. ^ "Kojey Radical Talks To Clash About 'In God's Body'". Clash Magazine. Retrieved 2018-02-26.
  14. ^ "Kojey Radical Returns 'In God's Body'". A Nation of Billions. Retrieved 2018-02-26.
  15. ^ Abiade, Yemi. "New Music: Kojey Radical - IN GODS BODY EP". www.dummymag.com. Retrieved 2018-02-26.
  16. ^ "Kojey Radical Speaks to FAULT About Latest Project, 'In Gods Body'". FAULT Magazine. 2017-11-24. Retrieved 2018-02-26.
  17. ^ "Are Brand Co-Signs More Impactful Than Artist Co-Signs?". PigeonsandPlanes. Retrieved 2018-02-26.