Koninklijke HFC

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Koninklijke HFC
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Full nameKoninklijke Haarlemsche Football Club
Nickname(s)Koninklijke HFC
Founded15 September 1879; 141 years ago (1879-09-15)
GroundComplex Koninklijke HFC
Haarlem
Capacity1,000
Coordinates52°21′49.7″N 4°37′22.4″E / 52.363806°N 4.622889°E / 52.363806; 4.622889
ChairmanGert-Jan Pruijn
ManagerGertjan Tamerus
LeagueTweede Divisie
2017–18Tweede Divisie, 10th
WebsiteClub website
Current season

Koninklijke Haarlemsche Football Club (Royal Haarlem Football Club) is a football club based in Haarlem, Netherlands. It is the oldest existing club in Dutch football, founded by Pim Mulier in 1879. During the club's early years the team only played rugby but due to financial problems they then switched to association football. The first official football match in the Netherlands was played in 1886 between HFC and Amsterdam Sport.

The club currently play in the Tweede Divisie (Second Division), a semi-professional tier re-established for the 2016–17 season, which is the third tier of the Dutch football pyramid.

History[edit]

Koninklijke HFC was the first Dutch Rugby club, established on 15 September 1879 by the 14-year-old Pim Mulier, who first encountered the sport in 1870. However HFC switched to association football in 1883. (The Delftsche Studenten Rugby Club was the first official rugby club on 24 September 1918.)

In 1899 they moved from their original ground "De Koekamp" to the "Spanjaardslaan", where they still play their home matches to this day. At that period the Spanjaardslaan (Spaniard's Lane), the east-west road at the southern edge of the oldest public park of the Netherlands, was part of the neighbouring town of Heemstede, but switched back to be part of Haarlem in 1927.

The beginning of football in the Netherlands

The Netherlands national football team have played two international matches at the Spanjaardslaan. Both matches were versus Belgium, resulting in a 1–2 loss and a 7–0 win. In the past HFC has contributed several players to the Netherlands national football team. Of those players, goalkeeper Gejus van der Meulen obtained the most caps, 54. At present his grandson still plays for HFC.

Before the Dutch championship was officially established, HFC won three unofficial national titles:

Three times in the club's history they have won the KNVB Cup (1904, 1913 and 1915). In the cup competition of 1903–1904 HFC beat VVV from Amsterdam 25–0, which still remains a record score in the Dutch cup competition.

The club was named Koninklijk (Royal) in 1959, 80 years after the club was founded.[1] Since 1923 the first team of HFC plays the opening match of a new year versus a selection of former Dutch international players on 1 January.

Current squad[edit]

As of 11 November 2020

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
2 DF Netherlands NED Danny Hols
3 DF Netherlands NED Oscar Wilffert
4 DF Netherlands NED Peet van der Slot
5 DF Netherlands NED Vincent Volkert
6 FW Netherlands NED Sietse Brandsma
7 FW Netherlands NED Daniël van Son
8 DF Netherlands NED Kevin van Gasteren
9 FW Netherlands NED Khalid Tadmine
10 MF Netherlands NED Franklin Lewis
11 FW Netherlands NED Jordy Hilterman
12 FW Netherlands NED Jeffrey van der Heijden
13 DF Netherlands NED Kane Prins
14 MF Netherlands NED Jacob Noordmans (captain)
15 MF Somalia SOM Liban Abdulahi
No. Pos. Nation Player
16 MF Netherlands NED André Morgan
17 FW Netherlands NED Roy Castien
18 DF Netherlands NED Wessel Boer
19 DF Netherlands NED Teun Versteeg
21 GK Netherlands NED Richard de Groot
22 GK Netherlands NED Tom Boks
23 DF Netherlands NED Deron Payne
25 FW Netherlands NED Noud Kaagman
27 DF Netherlands NED Roy Deken
28 MF Netherlands NED Lans Bovenberg
33 MF Netherlands NED Bram van de Wiel
38 MF Netherlands NED Taye Lee
51 MF Netherlands NED Mitchell Honkoop

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "H.F.C. voortaan 'koninklijk'". De Telegraaf. Amsterdam. 14 September 1959. p. 8. Retrieved 20 September 2020 – via Delpher.