Australia men's national field hockey team

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Australia
Australia
Nickname Kookaburras
Association Hockey Australia
Confederation OHF (Oceania)
Coach Robert Hammond
Assistant coach Anthony Potter
Manager Nathan Eglington
Captain Mark Knowles
FIH ranking 2 Steady (November 2017)
Team colours Team colours Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
First kit
Team colours Team colours Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Second kit
Australia men's national field hockey team
Medal record
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 2004 Athens Team
Silver medal – second place 1968 Mexico City Team
Silver medal – second place 1976 Montreal Team
Silver medal – second place 1992 Barcelona Team
Bronze medal – third place 1964 Tokyo Team
Bronze medal – third place 1996 Atlanta Team
Bronze medal – third place 2000 Sydney Team
Bronze medal – third place 2008 Beijing Team
Bronze medal – third place 2012 London Team
Australia at the 2008 Olympics
Australia at the 2012 Olympics

The Australia men's national field hockey team (nicknamed the Kookaburras) is one of the nation's most successful top-level sporting teams. They are the only Australian team in any sport to receive medals at the last six Summer Olympic Games (1992–2012), and have placed in the top four in every Olympics since 1980. They also won the Hockey World Cup in 1986, 2010 and 2014.

The Kookaburras' inability to win an Olympic gold medal despite their perennial competitiveness, led many in the Australian hockey community to speak of a "curse" afflicting the team,[1] finally broken in 2004 with the win in Athens.

History[edit]

Australia's first men's team competed in an international match in 1922.[2]

The first major competition won by the national team was the 1983 World Championships held in Karachi.[3]

Participations[edit]

Australia's first men's team competed at the Olympics in field hockey at the 1956 Summer Olympics.[3]

Australia did not medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics[4] or the 1988 Summer Olympics.[5] At the 1992 Summer Olympics, Australia earned a silver medal, losing gold to Germany.[6] At the 1996 Summer Olympics, Australia finished third, earning a bronze medal.[7]

The team won their first Olympic gold medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics. Barry Dancer coached the side.[8]

Should Australia win the gold medal at the 2012 London Olympics they will become the first national team in field hockey history to hold all four international titles available to them simultaneously. They would hold titles in the 2012 Olympics, 2010 World Cup, 2011 Champions Trophy and their continental championship (2011 Oceania Cup) at the same time. Along with those four titles Australia also holds the Commonwealth Games title from the 2010 championships.

Tournament History[edit]

A red box around the year indicates tournaments played within Australia

Team[edit]

Current roster[edit]

The following is the Australia squad for the 2016-17 Men's FIH Hockey World League Semifinals in Johannesburg.[9]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Club
30 GK Andrew Charter (1987-03-30) 30 March 1987 (age 30)Australian Capital Territory Canberra, ACT 122 Australia Canberra Lakers
24 GK Tyler Lovell (1987-05-23) 23 May 1987 (age 30)Western Australia Perth, WA 75 Australia WA Thundersticks
6 DF Matthew Dawson (1994-04-27) 27 April 1994 (age 23)New South Wales Killarney Vale, NSW 71 Australia NSW Waratahs
32 DF Jeremy Hayward (1993-03-03) 3 March 1993 (age 24)Northern Territory Darwin, NT 78 Australia NT Stingers
9 DF Mark Knowles (1984-03-10) 10 March 1984 (age 33)Queensland Rockhampton, QLD 295 Australia QLD Blades
20 DF Matthew Swann (1989-05-16) 16 May 1989 (age 28)Queensland Mackay, QLD 151 Australia QLD Blades
18 DF Tristan White (1990-07-11) 11 July 1990 (age 27)New South Wales Wollongong, NSW 85 Australia NSW Waratahs
5 MF Tom Wickham (1990-05-26) 26 May 1990 (age 27)South Australia Morgan, SA 12 Australia WA Thundersticks
7 MF Jeremy Edwards (1991-12-23) 23 December 1991 (age 25)Tasmania Hobart, TAS 17 Australia Tassie Tigers
14 MF Aaron Kleinschmidt (1989-10-01) 1 October 1989 (age 28)Victoria (Australia) Melbourne, VIC 18 Australia VIC Vikings
17 MF Aran Zalewski (1991-03-21) 21 March 1991 (age 26)Western Australia Margaret River, WA 106 Australia WA Thundersticks
23 MF Daniel Beale (1993-02-12) 12 February 1993 (age 24)Queensland Brisbane, QLD 96 Australia QLD Blades
31 MF Josh Pollard (1988-10-20) 20 October 1988 (age 29)Victoria (Australia) Melbourne, VIC 19 Australia VIC Vikings
2 FW Tom Craig (1995-09-03) 3 September 1995 (age 22)New South Wales Lane Cove, NSW 28 Australia NSW Waratahs
26 FW Dylan Wotherspoon (1993-04-09) 9 April 1993 (age 24)New South Wales Murwillumbah, NSW 35 Australia QLD Blades
12 FW Jake Whetton (1991-06-15) 15 June 1991 (age 26)Queensland Brisbane, QLD 123 Australia QLD Blades
25 FW Trent Mitton (1990-11-26) 26 November 1990 (age 26)Western Australia Perth, WA 102 Australia WA Thundersticks
28 FW Kiran Arunasalam (1995-06-01) 1 June 1995 (age 22)Victoria (Australia) Doncaster East, VIC 4 Australia VIC Vikings

The remainder of the 2016 national squad is as follows:[10]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Club
8 GK Tristan Clemons (1987-12-03) 3 December 1987 (age 29)Western Australia Bunbury, WA 35 Australia Tassie Tigers
10 DF Jack Thomson (2003-09-24) 24 September 2003 (age 14)Tasmania Hobart, TAS 19 Australia Tassie Tigers
21 DF Ben Craig (1993-04-09) 9 April 1993 (age 24)New South Wales Lane Cove, NSW 17 Australia NSW Waratahs
29 DF Andrew Philpott (1990-03-09) 9 March 1990 (age 27)Victoria (Australia) Melbourne, VIC 29 Australia VIC Vikings
11 MF Eddie Ockenden (1987-04-03) 3 April 1987 (age 30)Tasmania Hobart, TAS 284 Australia Tassie Tigers
19 MF Matt Willis (1991-02-21) 21 February 1991 (age 26)New South Wales Tamworth, NSW 26 Australia NSW Waratahs
13 FW Blake Govers (1996-07-06) 6 July 1996 (age 21)New South Wales Wollongong, NSW 38 Australia NSW Waratahs
15 FW Casey Hammond (1994-10-09) 9 October 1994 (age 23)Victoria (Australia) Bundoora, VIC 12 Australia VIC Vikings
22 FW Flynn Ogilvie (1993-09-17) 17 September 1993 (age 24)New South Wales Wollongong, NSW 50 Australia NSW Waratahs

Notable players[edit]

Family[edit]

Barry Dancer/Brent Dancer and Ric Charlesworth/Jonathan Charlesworth are two pairs of father as coach and son as player while both were affiliated with the national team in those positions.[8][11]

Recognition[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kookaburras ready to toss the monkey". Sydney Morning Herald. 26 August 2004. Archived from the original on 27 July 2009. Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  2. ^ Epstein, Jackie (21 October 2009). "Dwyer breaks free of Holland binds – Australia always comes first". Herald Sun. Melbourne, Australia. p. 76. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Department of Sport, Recreation and Tourism; Australian Sport Commission (1985). Australian Sport, a profile. Canberra, Australia: Australian Government Publish Service. pp. 177–178. ISBN 0644036672. 
  4. ^ Dorling Kindersley Limited. (1999). The Olympic Games. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Dorling Kindersley. p. 320. ISBN 1864660635. OCLC 57337092. 
  5. ^ Dorling Kindersley Limited. (1999). The Olympic Games. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Dorling Kindersley. p. 327. ISBN 1864660635. OCLC 57337092. 
  6. ^ Dorling Kindersley Limited. (1999). The Olympic Games. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Dorling Kindersley. p. 335. ISBN 1864660635. OCLC 57337092. 
  7. ^ Dorling Kindersley Limited. (1999). The Olympic Games. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Dorling Kindersley. p. 343. ISBN 1864660635. OCLC 57337092. 
  8. ^ a b Petrie, Andrea (18 October 2009). "Sons a chip off the old stick – HOCKEY". The Sunday Age. Melbourne, Australia. p. 19. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  9. ^ "Changes to Kookaburras World League Team". Hockey Australia. Retrieved 10 July 2017. 
  10. ^ "Kookaburras Squad Profiles". Hockey Australia. Retrieved 12 July 2017. 
  11. ^ Department of Sport, Recreation and Tourism; Australian Sport Commission (1985). Australian Sport, a profile. Canberra, Australia: Australian Government Publish Service. p. 116. ISBN 0644036672. 
  12. ^ a b c "Australian Sports Awards". Confederation of Australian Sport. Retrieved 8 February 2015. 
  13. ^ "Rabbitohs, Fearnley, Fox win top ASPAS". Australian Sports Commission News, 11 February 2015. Archived from the original on 11 February 2015. Retrieved 11 February 2015. 

External links[edit]