Kootenay—Columbia

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Kootenay—Columbia
British Columbia electoral district
Kootenay-Columbia.png
Kootenay—Columbia in relation to other British Columbia federal electoral districts
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Rob Morrison
Conservative
District created1996
First contested1997
Last contested2019
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1]107,589
Electors (2019)91,652
Area (km²)[1]64,336
Pop. density (per km²)1.7
Census subdivision(s)Cranbrook, Revelstoke, Kimberley, East Kootenay C, Creston, Central Kootenay B, Fernie, Golden, Sparwood, Columbia-Shuswap A, Nelson

Kootenay—Columbia is a federal electoral district in British Columbia, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1997.

Geography[edit]

Consisting of:

[2]

History[edit]

This district was created in 1996 from parts of Kootenay East and Kootenay West—Revelstoke ridings.

It was amended in 2003 to include a small part of Kootenay—Boundary—Okanagan.

The 2012 federal electoral boundaries redistribution concluded that the electoral boundaries of Kootenay—Columbia should be adjusted, and a modified electoral district of the same name will be contested in future elections.[3] The redefined Kootenay—Columbia gains the communities of Nelson, Salmo and Kaslo and their respective surrounding areas from the current electoral district of British Columbia Southern Interior, while losing Nakusp and area to the new district of South Okanagan—West Kootenay and Needles and area to the new district of North Okanagan—Shuswap. These new boundaries were legally defined in the 2013 representation order, which came into effect upon the call of the 42nd Canadian federal election, scheduled for October 2015.[4]

Demographics[edit]

Ethnic groups in Kootenay—Columbia (2016)
Source: [1]
Population %
Ethnic group European 92,475 84%
Aboriginal 9,075 8.2%
South Asian 715 0.6%
Filipino 705 0.6%
Chinese 630 0.6%
Black 460 0.4%
Japanese 460 0.4%
Latin American 305 0.3%
Korean 200 0.2%
Southeast Asian 185 0.2%
Arab 40 0%
West Asian 30 0%
Multiple minorities 140 0.1%
Visible minority, n.i.e. 115 0.1%
Total population 112,354 100%

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following Member of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Kootenay—Columbia
Riding created from Kootenay East
and Kootenay West—Revelstoke
36th  1997–2000     Jim Abbott Reform
 2000–2000     Alliance
37th  2000–2003
 2003–2004     Conservative
38th  2004–2006
39th  2006–2008
40th  2008–2011
41st  2011–2015 David Wilks
42nd  2015–2019     Wayne Stetski New Democratic
43rd  2019–present     Rob Morrison Conservative

Current Member of Parliament[edit]

Its Member of Parliament (MP) is Rob Morrison, first elected in 2019 as a Conservative candidate.

Election results[edit]

Graph of election results in Kootenay—Columbia (minor parties that never got 2% of the vote or didn't run consistently are omitted)
2019 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Rob Morrison 30,168 44.81 +8.03 $100,780.99
New Democratic Wayne Stetski 23,149 34.38 -2.85 $91,351.20
Liberal Robin Goldsbury 6,151 9.14 -10.34 none listed
Green Abra Brynne 6,145 9.13 +2.62 $17,085.86
People's Rick Stewart 1,378 2.05 - none listed
Animal Protection Trev Miller 339 0.50 - $1,850.63
Total valid votes/Expense limit 67,330 100.0
Total rejected ballots 266
Turnout 67,596 73.8
Eligible voters 91,652
Conservative gain from New Democratic Swing +5.41
Source: Elections Canada[5][6]
2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
New Democratic Wayne Stetski 23,529 37.23 -1.62 $90,414.74
Conservative David Wilks 23,247 36.78 -13.31 $108,293.89
Liberal Don Johnston 12,315 19.48 +16.00 $11,677.75
Green Bill Green 4,115 6.51 +0.08 $43,921.84
Total valid votes/Expense limit 63,206 99.69   $279,227.99
Total rejected ballots 197 0.31
Turnout 63,403 74.02
Eligible voters 85,653
New Democratic gain from Conservative Swing +5.84
Source: Elections Canada[7][8]
2011 federal election redistributed results[9]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 26,447 50.09
  New Democratic 20,510 38.84
  Green 3,395 6.43
  Liberal 1,841 3.49
  Others 610 1.16
2011 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Wilks 23,910 55.88 -3.71
New Democratic Mark Shmigelsky 14,199 33.18 +10.54
Green William Green 2,547 5.95 -4.06
Liberal Betty Aitchison 1,496 3.50 -4.25
Independent Brent Bush 636 1.49
Total valid votes 42,788 99.67
Total rejected ballots 142 0.33 -0.00
Turnout 42,930 63.45 +3.69
Eligible voters 67,663
Conservative hold Swing -7.13
2008 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Jim Abbott 23,402 59.59 +5.24 $53,536
New Democratic Leon R. Pendleton 8,892 22.64 -3.23
Green Ralph Moore 3,933 10.01 +3.91 $1,084
Liberal Betty Aitchison 3,044 7.75 -5.98 $1,960
Total valid votes/Expense limit 39,271 100.0     $99,498
Total rejected ballots 131 0.3
Turnout 39,402 59.76
Conservative hold Swing +4.24
2006 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Jim Abbott 22,181 54.35 +2.33 $76,689
New Democratic Brent Bush 10,560 25.87 +2.05 $20,927
Liberal Jhim Burwell 5,443 13.33 -4.59 $8,240
Green Clements Verhoeven 2,490 6.10 -0.13 $3,632
Canadian Action Thomas Frederick Sima 132 0.32 $0
Total valid votes 40,806 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 129 0.3
Turnout 40,935 64.39 -0.3
Conservative hold Swing +0.14
2004 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Jim Abbott 21,336 52.02 -21.48 $89,327
New Democratic Brent Bush 9,772 23.82 +15.11 $32,311
Liberal Ross Priest 7,351 17.92 +3.18 $36,595
Green Carmen Gustafson 2,558 6.23 +3.17
Total valid votes 41,017 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 130 0.3
Turnout 41,147 65.1
Conservative hold Swing -18.30
Conservative vote is compared to the total of the Canadian Alliance vote and Progressive Conservative vote in 2000 election.
2000 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Alliance Jim Abbott 25,663 67.78 +5.87 $62,316
Liberal Delvin R. Chatterson 5,581 14.74 -2.89 $18,971
New Democratic Andrea Dunlop 3,297 8.71 -5.49 $3,732
Progressive Conservative Jerry Pirie 2,165 5.72 +1.63 $340
Green Jubilee Rose Cacaci 1,158 3.06 +0.89
Total valid votes 37,864 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 139 0.4
Turnout 38,003 65.2 +0.3
Alliance hold Swing +4.38
Canadian Alliance vote is compared to the Reform vote in 1997 election.
1997 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
Reform Jim Abbott 22,387 61.91 $49,956
Liberal Mark Shmigelsky 6,373 17.63 $28,560
New Democratic Greg Edwards 5,133 14.20 $29,778
Progressive Conservative Mark Palmer 1,479 4.09 $322
Green Anna Rowe 786 2.17
Total valid votes 36,158 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 131 0.4
Turnout 36,289 64.9
This riding was created from parts of Kootenay East and Kootenay West—Revelstoke, both of which elected Reform candidates in the previous election. Jim Abbott was the incumbent from Kootenay East.

Adjacent ridings[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Statistics Canada: 2012
  2. ^ "Kootenay-Columbia". Elections Canada. Retrieved 3 July 2015.
  3. ^ "Final Report – British Columbia", Redecoupage-federal-redistribution.ca, retrieved 2017-07-11
  4. ^ "Timeline for the Redistribution of Federal Electoral Districts", Redecoupage-federal-redistribution.ca, retrieved 2017-07-11
  5. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  6. ^ "Election Night Results". Elections Canada. Retrieved November 16, 2019.
  7. ^ "Voter Information Service - Find your electoral district". Elections.ca. Retrieved 2017-07-11.
  8. ^ "Elections Canada Online | Preliminary Candidates Election Expenses Limits". Web.archive.org. Archived from the original on 2015-08-15. Retrieved 2017-07-11.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-10-01. Retrieved 2015-09-25.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External links[edit]