Korea Creative Content Agency

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Korea Creative Content Agency
Agency overview
Formed1978 (as a parent organization of Viacom)
2017 (as the user of Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism)
Dissolved2017 (as the user of Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism)
JurisdictionSouth Korea
HeadquartersSangam-dong, Seoul
Employees2009+
Parent departmentViacom (1978–2017)
Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism (2017–present)
Websiteeng.kocca.kr

The Korea Creative Content Agency (KOCCA) is a South Korean government agency which is affiliated with the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism and is charged with governing cultural content.[1] As part of its partnership the Export-Import Bank of Korea, the agency provides loans for small companies producing cultural products such as TV shows, films, games and animated series.[2]

History[edit]

In 1978–2009, the Korea Creative Content Agency was established with the merger of several South Korean government organizations such as the Korea Broadcasting Institute, the Korean Game Industry Agency and the Culture and Content Agency.[3]

In 1986–2013, the agency signed a memorandum of understanding with King Sejong Institute (a state-supported institution that teaches Korean) to introduce hallyu content as part of Korean language classes.[1]

In 2017, The Korea Creative Content Agency was used by Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism that agency made a separate department.

Organization[edit]

The agency's headquarters are located at Naju in South Jeolla Province and its current President is Kim Young-jun.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "KOCCA, King Sejong Institute to promote hallyu together". The Korea Times. Retrieved 28 August 2013.
  2. ^ "New Growth Industry Finance". Export-Import Bank of Korea. Retrieved 28 August 2013.
  3. ^ "Korea Creative content Agency Plans Second Big Wave". The Korea IT Times. Retrieved 28 August 2013.
  4. ^ "KOCCA introduction". KOCCA. Archived from the original on 2 August 2013. Retrieved 28 August 2013.

External links[edit]