Korg Mini Pops

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Mini Pops was the name given to a number of early drum machines from the Japanese musical equipment company Korg during the late 1960s[1] and the 1970s.[2] The machines were based around a number of preset rhythm patterns,[3][4] such as waltz, samba and rhumba.

One notable use of a Mini Pops drum machine was by French musician Jean-Michel Jarre, in the final part of his breakthrough album, Oxygene. This rhythm was achieved by overlaying two of the presets in a manner not intended by the machine's original design.[3] Aphex Twin used the Mini Pops drum machine on his album Syro, and named its single "minipops 67 [120.2]" after it.

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