Kota Formation

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Kota Formation
Stratigraphic range: Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous
TypeGeological formation
Location
RegionSouth Asia
Country India
ExtentTelangana

The Kota Formation is a geological formation in India. The dates for the Kora Formation are uncertain, but it dates from the Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, and is split into a Lower Member and Upper Member[1]. The lower members is though to be Hettangian-Pliensbachian[2].

Paleofauna[edit]

Vertebrate paleofauna[edit]

Indeterminate thyreophoran remains geographically present in Andhra Pradesh State, India. These were given the name Andhrasaurus by Roman Ulansky in 2014.[2]

Ornithodires reported from the Kota Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Material Notes Images

Barapasaurus[2]

B. tagorei[2]

Geographically present in Telangana State, India.[2]

"Scattered remains of more than [six] partial skeletons without skulls, manus, or pes."[3]


Campylognathoides[4]

C. indicus[4]

Geographically present in the Chanda District of Deccan India.[4]

Dandakosaurus

D. indicus

"Proximal pubis."[5]

.[2]

Kotasaurus[2]

K. yamanpaliensis[2]

Geographically present in Telangana State, India.[2]

"Nearly complete skeleton without skull."[6]

Mammaliaformes reported from the Kota Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Material Notes Images

Gondtherium[1]

B. dattai[1]

Kotatherium[7]

K. haldanei[7]

Indotherium[8].

I. pranhitai[8]

Invertebrate paleofauna[edit]

Insects of the Kota Formation[9][10]
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Material Notes

Kotaphialtites

K. frankmortoni

Geographically present in Andhra Pradesh State, India.

An ephialtitid hymenopteran.

Taschigatra

T. bharataja

Geographically present in Andhra Pradesh State, India.

A rhagionid dipteran.

T. tulyabhijana

Geographically present in Andhra Pradesh State, India.

A rhagionid dipteran.

Xyelula

X. alexandri

Geographically present in Andhra Pradesh State, India.

A sepulcid hymenopteran.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Prasad GVR, and Manhas BK. 2007. A new docodont mammal from the Jurassic Kota Formation of India. Palaeontologia electronica, 10.2: 1-11
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Weishampel, David B; et al. (2004). "Dinosaur distribution (Early Jurassic, Asia)." In: Weishampel, David B.; Dodson, Peter; and Osmólska, Halszka (eds.): The Dinosauria, 2nd, Berkeley: University of California Press. Pp. 534–535. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.
  3. ^ "Table 13.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 263.
  4. ^ a b c Wellnhofer, Peter (1991). "Summary of Lower Jurassic Pterosaurs." The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Pterosaurs. London, UK: Salamander Books Limited. p. 79. ISBN 0-86101-566-5.
  5. ^ "Table 4.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 78.
  6. ^ "Table 13.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 261.
  7. ^ a b Datta PM. 1981. The first Jurassic mammal from India. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society of London, 73:307-312
  8. ^ a b Yadagiri P. 1984. New symmetrodonts from Kota Formation (Early Jurassic), India. Journal of the Geological Society of India, 25:514-621
  9. ^ Mostovski M.B., Jarzembowski E.A. 2000. The first brachycerous flies (Diptera: Rhagionidae) from the Lower Jurassic of Gondwana. Paleontological Journal 34 (Suppl. 3): 367-369.[1]
  10. ^ Rasnitsyn A.P. 2008. New hymenopteran insects (Insecta: Vespida) from the Lower or Middle Jurassic of India. Paleontological Journal 42 (1): 81-85.[2]