Koteka Tribal Assembly

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The Koteka Tribal Assembly (Dewan Musyawarah Masyarakat Adat Koteka - DeMMaK) is a cultural organisation of the Koteka tribes of Papua. It was established in January 2000 as an outcome of discussions among the elders of several tribes in the highlands of West Papua. The main goal of the assembly is to peacefully, democratically and legally work towards the recognition and protection of customary laws, values and beliefs of the Koteka peoples.[1] Many activist from the organization that were involved in peaceful protests have been tortured and forced into exile.[2]

The Koteka Tribal Assembly (DEMMAK) was in May 2000, prior to the Papuan Peoples Congress II (2000) held in Jayapura. The field leader of DEMMAK is Benny Wenda. Sam Karoba is the founder and international chair of DEMMAK. Though DEMMAK is generally supportive of the PDP, it accuses the latter of being too accommodating of the government.

Koteka Tribes consists of seven major tribes in the Central and Southern Highlands of West Papua, namely Lani, Mee, Amungme, Kamoro, Yali, Damal, and Moni with other sub-tribes such as Nggem, Walak, Hubla, Kimyal, Momuna, Ngalik.

The above is the division of the Koteka Tribes according to foreigners. The people from the Koteka Tribes themselves classify the Koteka Tribes into four major tribes: Lani, Mee, Loma and Yali Tribes.

It is organised in as a confederation that consists of elders who independently and autonomously join and or leave the assembly as they wish, and contribute to the organisation according to their willingness and capabilities in order to achieve their goal. Demmak is managed under coordination of a Secretary-General that is assisted by Coordinators based on activities carried out within the Assembly.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Myles Burke (12 June 2013). "Benny Wenda: In 20 years my people will have disappeared'". The Telegraph. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  2. ^ Ruth Styles (11 October 2011). "The Smell of Freedom: Lush gets behind the Free West Papua campaign". The Ecologist. Retrieved 2018-01-08.