Kouachra

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Kouachra
الكواشرة
Village
Country  Lebanon
Governorate North Governorate
District Akkar District
Area
 • Total 5.58 km2 (2.15 sq mi)
Elevation 700 m (2,300 ft)
Population
 • Total 2,763
 • Density 500/km2 (1,300/sq mi)
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Dialing code +961

Kouachra (also spelled as Kaweishra or Kavashra)[1][2] is a Lebanese village. It is located approximately 131 kilometres (81 mi) north of Beirut and 38 kilometres (24 mi) north of Tripoli.[3][4]

Location[edit]

It is located in Akkar District, near Al Qoubaiyat and about a 1-hour drive from Tripoli. The village is situated on flat terrain at an altitude of 700–800 meters (2,300–2,600 ft) above sea level.[5]

The village has a small artificial lake.[6]

Population[edit]

It has a population of about 2,800 people, mostly of Sunni Turkish origin.[7][8] Most of its residents are farmers.[9]

The villagers support the Future Movement political party.[10]

Turkish identity[edit]

Owing to its Turkish ethnic identity, the village was visited by the Prime Minister of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, in 2010[11][12] and has received Turkish developmental assistance and funding, including university scholarships in Turkey.[13]

According to one local: "After Ottoman rule ended in Lebanon, we decided to stay on our land. We still maintain our Turkish language and traditions."[14]

The village also houses several hundred Syrian Turkmen who fled the Syrian Civil War.[15][16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Syrian Turkmen flee to Lebanon's Turkish village". World Bulletin. 6 December 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  2. ^ Oytun Orhan (February 2010). "THE FORGOTTEN TURKS: TURKMENS OF LEBANON" (PDF). Center for Middle Eastern Strategic Studies. p. 8. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  3. ^ "Syrian Turkmen flee to Lebanon's Turkish village". World Bulletin. 6 December 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  4. ^ "Kouachra". Localiban. 3 June 2015. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  5. ^ Oytun Orhan (February 2010). "THE FORGOTTEN TURKS: TURKMENS OF LEBANON" (PDF). Center for Middle Eastern Strategic Studies. p. 8. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  6. ^ George Taylor (1971). The Roman Temples of Lebanon: A Pictorial Guide (2 ed.). Dar el-Machreq Publishers. p. 166. 
  7. ^ Oytun Orhan (February 2010). "THE FORGOTTEN TURKS: TURKMENS OF LEBANON" (PDF). Center for Middle Eastern Strategic Studies. p. 8. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  8. ^ "Syrian Turkmen flee to Lebanon's Turkish village". World Bulletin. 6 December 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  9. ^ "Kaweishra: A Turkish village in Lebanon". Anadolu Agency. 4 December 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  10. ^ Oytun Orhan (February 2010). "THE FORGOTTEN TURKS: TURKMENS OF LEBANON" (PDF). Center for Middle Eastern Strategic Studies. p. 8. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  11. ^ TULAY KARADENIZ (28 Aug 2014). "Turkey's Erdogan consolidates power with ascent to presidency". Reuters. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  12. ^ PATRICK GALEY (24 Nov 2010). "Turkish PM urges Israeli apology during Lebanon trip". Hürriyet Daily News. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  13. ^ "Kaweishra: A Turkish village in Lebanon". Anadolu Agency. 4 December 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  14. ^ "Kaweishra: A Turkish village in Lebanon". Anadolu Agency. 4 December 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  15. ^ "Syrian Turkmen flee to Lebanon's Turkish village". World Bulletin. 6 December 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 
  16. ^ "Turkey extends aid to Turkmen refugees in Lebanon". ANADOLU AGENCY. 15 January 2015. Retrieved 28 June 2015. 

Coordinates: 34°36′43″N 36°12′29″E / 34.612°N 36.208°E / 34.612; 36.208