Kristina Šmigun-Vähi

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Kristina Šmigun-Vähi
Kristina Šmigun Otepää MK.JPG
Kristina Šmigun in Otepää in 2006
Born (1977-02-23) 23 February 1977 (age 40)
Tartu, Estonia
Height 168 cm (5 ft 6 in)
Ski club Oti Sportclub
World Cup career
Seasons 19942007, 2010
Individual wins 16
Indiv. podiums 50
Overall titles 0 – (2nd in 2000 and 2003)
Updated on 7 September 2016.

Kristina Šmigun-Vähi (born 23 February 1977 in Tartu) is a former and so far most successful Estonian female cross-country skier. Her parents, Anatoli Šmigun and Rutt Rehemaa were both prominent Nordic skiers. Kristina Šmigun-Vähi was coached by her father.

Career[edit]

On 12 February 2006, she won the Winter Olympics gold medal for the 7.5 km + 7.5 km double pursuit, becoming the first Estonian woman to win a medal at the Winter Olympics. Four days later, she won a second gold medal in the 10 km classical.

On 15 February 2010, she won her third Olympic medal, a silver in the 10 km freestyle race. With two golds and one silver, Kristina Šmigun-Vähi is the most successful Estonian athlete in Olympic history (summer or winter), tying the record of men's cross-country skier Andrus Veerpalu.

Šmigun-Vähi has also found success at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships, earning six medals. This included one gold (2003: 5 km + 5 km double pursuit), three silvers (1999: 15 km, 2003: 10 km, 15 km), and two bronzes (1999, 2003: both in 30 km).

On 2 July 2010, Šmigun-Vähi announced that she will quit her professional sport career to focus on her family and her daughter Victoria-Kris. On 24 October 2016, the World Anti-Doping Agency Athletes' Commission stated that Šmig-Vähi faced a Court of Arbitration for Sport hearing before the end of October.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Šmigun-Vähi is married to her long-time manager Kristjan-Thor Vähi (07.07.2007). She did not participate in the 2007–08 season due to pregnancy and she also missed the following 2008–2009 season. Her daughter Victoria-Kris was born in June 2008. Šmigun-Vähi had a son in March 2011.

World Cup results[edit]

Kristina Šmigun and Kateřina Neumannová in 2006

All results are sourced from the International Ski Federation (FIS).[2]

Season titles[edit]

  • 2 titles – (1 long distance, 1 middle distance)
 Season  Discipline
1999 Long Distance
2000  Middle Distance 

Season standings[edit]

 Season  Age Overall Distance Sprint
1994 16 60 N/A N/A
1995 17 29 N/A N/A
1996 18 17 N/A N/A
1997 19 13 21[a] 15
1998 20 19 15[a] 7
1999 21 4 1[a] 3
2000 22 2 1[b] 2[b] 3
2001 23 10 N/A 23
2002 24 4 N/A 24
2003 25 2 N/A 41
2004 26 5 3 47
2005 27 4 3 79
2006 28 17 11 38
2007 29 11 5
2008 30 family leave
2009 31
2010 32 32 22 84
a. 1 2 3 Awarded as "Long Distance World Cup".
b. 1 Champion in the Middle Distance World Cup.
    2 Second in the Long Distance World Cup.

Individual podiums[edit]

  • 16 victories
  • 50 podiums
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place
1 1998–99 27 December 1998 Germany Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany 1.0 km Sprint F World Cup 2nd
2 5 January 1999 Estonia Otepää, Estonia 10 km C Individual World Cup 3rd
3 12 January 1999 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 15 km F Mass Start World Cup 1st
4 19 February 1999 Austria Ramsau, Austria 15 km F Mass Start World Championships[a] 2nd
5 27 February 1999 Austria Ramsau, Austria 30 km C Mass Start World Championships[a] 3rd
6 20 March 1999 Norway Oslo, Norway 30 km F Mass Start World Cup 3rd
7 1999–2000 5 December 1999 Sweden Kiruna, Sweden 5 km C Individual World Cup 3rd
8 10 December 1999 Italy Sappada, Italy 10 km F Individual World Cup 1st
9 28 December 1999 Germany Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany 1.5 km F Sprint World Cup 1st
10 8 January 2000 Russia Moscow, Russia 15 km F Mass Start World Cup 2nd
11 12 January 2000 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 15 km F Mass Start World Cup 2nd
12 16 February 2000  Switzerland  Ulrichen, Switzerland 5 km C Individual World Cup 1st
13 20 February 2000 France Lamoura Mouthe, France 44 km F Mass Start World Cup 2nd
14 3 March 2000 Finland Lahti, Finland 1.2 km Sprint F World Cup 1st
15 2000–01 29 November 2000 Norway Beitostølen, Norway 5 km F Individual World Cup 3rd
16 20 December 2000  Switzerland  Davos, Switzerland 15 km C Mass Start World Cup 3rd
17 2001–02 25 November 2001 Finland Kuopio, Finland 5 km F Individual World Cup 3rd
18 12 December 2001 Italy Brusson, Italy 10 km F Individual World Cup 3rd
19 15 December 2001  Switzerland  Davos, Switzerland 10 km C Individual World Cup 2nd
20 22 December 2001 Austria Ramsau, Austria 15 km F Mass Start World Cup 1st
21 2 March 2002 Finland Lahti, Finland 10 km F Individual World Cup 1st
22 16 March 2002 Norway Oslo, Norway 30 km F Mass Start World Cup 2nd
23 2002–03 23 November 2002 Sweden Kiruna, Sweden 5 km F Individual World Cup 1st
24 30 November 2002 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 10 km C Individual World Cup 2nd
25 7 December 2002  Switzerland  Davos, Switzerland 10 km F Individual World Cup 2nd
26 14 December 2002 Italy Cogne, Italy 10 km C Mass Start World Cup 2nd
27 21 December 2002 Austria Ramsau, Austria 2x5 km M Pursuit World Cup 3rd
28 4 January 2003 Russia Kavgolovo, Russia 5 km F Individual World Cup 1st
29 12 January 2003 Estonia Otepää, Estonia 15 km C Mass Start World Cup 2nd
30 18 January 2003 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 10 km F Individual World Cup 3rd
31 2003–04 22 November 2003 Norway Beitostølen, Norway 10 km F Individual World Cup 1st
32 28 November 2003 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 10 km C Individual World Cup 2nd
33 29 November 2003 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 2x7.5 km M Pursuit World Cup 1st
34 6 December 2003 Italy Toblach, Italy 15 km F Mass Start World Cup 1st
35 20 December 2003 Austria Ramsau, Austria 10 km F Individual World Cup 3rd
36 21 December 2003 Austria Ramsau, Austria 2x7.5 km M Pursuit World Cup 1st
37 6 January 2004 Sweden Falun, Sweden 2x7.5 km M Pursuit World Cup 3rd
38 10 January 2004 Estonia Otepää, Estonia 15 km C Mass Start World Cup 2nd
39 2004–05 20 November 2004 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 10 km C Individual World Cup 2nd
40 26 November 2004 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 10 km F Individual World Cup 2nd
41 28 November 2004 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 10 km C Individual World Cup 1st
42 11 December 2004 Italy Lago di Tesero, Italy 2x7.5 km M Pursuit World Cup 2nd
43 18 December 2004 Austria Ramsau, Austria 15 km F Mass Start World Cup 1st
44 2005–06 27 November 2005 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 10 km F Individual World Cup 3rd
45 7 January 2006 Estonia Otepää, Estonia 10 km C Individual World Cup 2nd
46 2006–07 18 November 2006 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 10 km F Individual World Cup 2nd
47 26 November 2006 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 10 km C Individual World Cup 3rd
48 11 March 2007 Finland Lahti, Finland 10 km C Individual World Cup 1st
49 2009–10 12 December 2009  Switzerland  Davos, Switzerland 10 km F Individual World Cup 3rd
50 21 March 2010 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km F Handicap Stage World Cup 3rd
a. 1 2 1999 World Championship races are included in the 1998–99 World Cup scoring system.

Overall record[edit]

Result Distance Races[a] Sprint Ski
Tours
Individual
Events
Team Events All Events
≤ 5 km[b] ≤ 10 km[b] ≤ 15 km[b] ≤ 30 km[b] ≥ 30 km[b] Pursuit[c] Team Sprint Relay[d]
1st place 3 5 4 2 2 16 16
2nd place 9 5 1 1 1 1 18 18
3rd place 3 8 1 2 2 16 16
Podiums 6 22 10 3 1 5 3 50 50
Top 10 16 47 18 8 1 13 7 1 111 4 115
Points 27 58 27 10 2 18 20 1 163 6 169
Others 2 2 1 4 1[e] 10 10
Starts 29 60 27 10 2 19 24 2 173 6 179
a. 1 Classification is made according to FIS classification.
b. 1 2 3 4 5 Includes individual and mass start races.
c. 1 Includes pursuit and double pursuit races.
d. 1 May be incomplete due to lack of appropriate sources prior to 2001.
e. 1 Withdrawn from 2006–07 Tour de Ski.

Note: Until 1999 World Championships and 1994 Olympics, World Championship and Olympic races are part of the World Cup. Hence results from those races are included in the World Cup overall record.

Olympic results Olympic rings with white rims.svg[edit]

  • 3 medals – (2 gold, 1 silver)
  Year    Age   5 km 
 individual 
 10 km 
 individual 
 2x5 km 
 pursuit 
 15 km 
individual
 15 km 
 pursuit 
 15 km 
mass start
 30 km 
individual
 30 km 
mass start
 Sprint   4x5 km 
 relay 
 Team 
 sprint 
1994 17 30 N/A N/A 28 27 N/A N/A N/A N/A
1998 21 N/A N/A N/A 46 N/A N/A N/A
2002 25 N/A DNF 13 N/A N/A 7 7 N/A 25 N/A
2006 29 N/A 1 N/A N/A 1 N/A N/A 8
2010 33 N/A 2 N/A N/A DNF N/A N/A 27

World Championship results[edit]

  • 6 medals – (1 gold, 3 silver, 2 bronze)
  Year    Age   5 km 
 individual 
 10 km 
 individual 
 2x5 km 
 pursuit 
 15 km 
 individual 
 15 km 
 pursuit 
 15 km 
mass start
 30 km 
individual
 30 km 
mass start
 Sprint   4x5 km 
 relay 
 Team 
 sprint 
1995 18 5 N/A N/A 20 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
1997 20 28 N/A N/A 8 9 N/A N/A N/A N/A
1999 22 9 N/A N/A 2 6 N/A 3 N/A N/A N/A
2001 24 N/A 12 41 N/A N/A   CNX[a] N/A 19 N/A
2003 26 N/A 2 1 N/A N/A 2 3 N/A N/A
2005 28 N/A 4 N/A N/A DNF N/A N/A 14 13
2007 30 N/A 9 N/A N/A 10 N/A N/A 6 15
a. 1 Cancelled due to extremely cold weather.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Butler, Nick (24 Oct 2016). "Šmigun-Vähi facing CAS hearing after "positive" retest at Turin 2006". INSIDETHEGAMES.BIZ. Dunsar Media Company Limited. Retrieved 2016-10-24. 
  2. ^ "Kristina Šmigun-Vähi". FIS-Ski. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 8 January 2017. 

External links[edit]

Awards
Preceded by
Erika Salumäe
Estonian Sportswoman of the Year
1997
Succeeded by
Jane Salumäe
Preceded by
Jane Salumäe
Estonian Sportswoman of the Year
19992000
Succeeded by
Heidi Rohi
Preceded by
Heidi Rohi
Estonian Sportswoman of the Year
20022004
Succeeded by
Maarika Võsu
Preceded by
Maarika Võsu
Estonian Sportswoman of the Year
2006
Succeeded by
Irina Embrich
Preceded by
Ksenija Balta
Estonian Sportswoman of the Year
2010
Succeeded by
Triin Aljand