Kursk Nuclear Power Plant

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Kursk Nuclear Power Plant
RIAN archive 341194 Kursk Nuclear Power Plant.jpg
Control room at the Kursk Nuclear Power Plant
Official name
  • Курская АЭС
CountryRussia
Coordinates51°40′30″N 35°36′20″E / 51.67500°N 35.60556°E / 51.67500; 35.60556Coordinates: 51°40′30″N 35°36′20″E / 51.67500°N 35.60556°E / 51.67500; 35.60556
StatusOperational
Construction began1 June 1972
Commission date12 October 1977
Operator(s)Rosenergoatom
Nuclear power station
Reactor typeRBMK-1000
Power generation
Units operational4 × 1,000 MW
Nameplate capacity4,000 MW
Capacity factor65.0%
Annual net output22,760 GW·h
External links
Websitekunpp.ru
CommonsRelated media on Commons

The Kursk Nuclear Power Plant (Russian: Курская АЭС [About this soundpronunciation ]) is a nuclear power plant located in western Russia on the bank of the Seym River about 40 kilometers west of the city of Kursk. The nearby town of Kurchatov was founded when construction of the plant began. The plant feeds the grid for Kursk Oblast and 19 other regions.

The four reactors at the plant are RBMK-1000 reactors, the same type used at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, but a different model. The plant was originally equipped with two reactors. Two more reactors were added between 1983 and 1985.

In 2018, the first concrete construction started on Kursk-II-1, a VVER-TOI reactor. Kursk-II-1 and II-2 will replace Kursk 1 and 2 which are approaching end of life.[1][2]

The structure of the Kursk plant is almost identical to Chernobyl's structure. The 1991 American television movie Chernobyl: The Final Warning used the Kursk plant and the neighbouring town of Kurchatov to stand in for Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and Pripyat.

Reactor data[edit]

The Kursk Nuclear Power Plant has 4 operational units:

Unit[3] Reactor type Net
capacity
Gross
capacity
Construction
started
Electricity
Grid
Commercial
Operation
Shutdown
Kursk 1 RBMK-1000 925 MW 1,000 MW 1972-06-01 1976-12-19 1977-10-12 2021, planned
Kursk 2 RBMK-1000 925 MW 1,000 MW 1973-01-01 1979-01-28 1979-08-17 2024, planned
Kursk 3 RBMK-1000 925 MW 1,000 MW 1978-04-01 1983-10-17 1984-03-30 2029, planned
Kursk 4 RBMK-1000 925 MW 1,000 MW 1981-05-01 1985-12-02 1986-02-05 2030, planned
Kursk 5 RBMK-1000 925 MW 1,000 MW 1985-12-01 - 1992 (planned) Construction stopped 1989, cancelled 2012-08-15
Kursk 6[4] RBMK-1000 925 MW 1,000 MW 1986-08-01 - - Construction cancelled 1993-12-01
Kursk II-1[5] VVER-1300/510 1,115 MW 1,255 MW 2018-04-29[6] - - -
Kursk II-2 VVER-1300/510 1,115 MW 1,255 MW 2019-04-15 - - -

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Russia to start building Kursk-II in first half of 2018". Nuclear Engineering International. 23 January 2018. Retrieved 4 February 2018.
  2. ^ "AEM Technology sees milestone with first VVER-TOI". World Nuclear News. 17 April 2018. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  3. ^ Power Reactor Information System of the IAEA: „Russian Federation: Nuclear Power Reactors“ Archived 26 December 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Kursk-6 on the PRIS of the IAEA
  5. ^ Kursk 2-1 on the PRIS of the IAEA
  6. ^ http://www.atominfo.ru/newss/z0219.htm

External links[edit]