Kurt Daudt

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Kurt Daudt
Minnesota State Representative Kurt Daudt, 2019.jpg
Minority Leader of the Minnesota House of Representatives
Assumed office
January 8, 2019
Preceded byMelissa Hortman
In office
January 8, 2013 – January 6, 2015
Preceded byPaul Thissen
Succeeded byPaul Thissen
60th Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives
In office
January 6, 2015 – January 7, 2019
Preceded byPaul Thissen
Succeeded byMelissa Hortman
Member of the Minnesota House of Representatives
from the 31A district
17A (2011–2013)
Assumed office
January 4, 2011
Preceded byRob Eastlund
Personal details
Born (1973-09-26) September 26, 1973 (age 45)
Springfield, Minnesota, U.S.
Political partyRepublican

Kurt Louis Daudt (born September 26, 1973) is an American politician and the Minority Leader of the Minnesota House of Representatives. He is a former Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives. A member of the Republican Party of Minnesota, he represents District 31A, which includes portions of Anoka, Isanti, and Sherburne counties in east-central Minnesota, north of the Twin Cities metropolitan area.[1] He lives beside Spectacle Lake in Isanti County.[2]

Early life, education, and career[edit]

Daudt attended Princeton High School, where he graduated in 1992. Rep. Sondra Erickson was his English teacher there. Daudt attended the University of North Dakota to study aviation management but did not graduate.[3][4] He is a licensed private airline pilot.

Daudt served as an Isanti County commissioner from 2005 to 2010. Before that, he was a township board supervisor for Stanford Township from 1995 to 2005, and a member of the East Central Regional Library Board. He was also a founding member of Project 24, a nonprofit organization that builds orphanages in Kenya. To date, the project has raised over $500,000 and built six orphanages.[1][5] Before his election to the legislature, he worked at auto dealerships as a salesman and business manager.[2]

Minnesota House of Representatives[edit]

Tenure[edit]

Daudt was first elected in 2010. After Republicans won a House majority in the 2014 mid-term elections, Daudt was selected by Republicans to become Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives for the session beginning in 2015. Daudt was elected as Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives by the full House on January 6, 2015. Daudt is the youngest person to serve as Speaker since the 1930s. [6]

Committee assignments[edit]

Daudt in 2013

Daudt served on the Elections Committee and the Rules and Legislative Administration Committee for the 2013-2015 Session. He previously served on the Commerce and Regulatory Reform, the Higher Education Policy and Finance, and the Redistricting committees, as well as on the Taxes Subcommittee for the Property and Local Tax Division.[1]

Controversies[edit]

In 2013, Daudt, then the House minority leader, was involved in an incident in Montana when a friend Daniel Weinzetl, brandished a handgun during the sale of a vintage vehicle, pointing it at the seller's "entire family, including the children." The handgun belonged to Daudt.[7] The altercation arose after Daudt and the seller differed about the condition of the vehicle. Daudt was later released by Montana police without being charged with a crime. [8]

In 2016, Daudt was accused of using his position as Speaker of the House to garner favorable treatment from credit card companies. In 2015, U.S. Bank and Capital One won legal judgments against Daudt, stemming from his failure to pay approximately $13,000 in overdue charges and legal fees incurred pursuing the money. However, the companies declined to pursue the judgments after a lobbying firm with clients with interests at the legislature appeared to intervene on Daudt's behalf. [9]

In August 2017, Daudt joined other Republican state legislators on a free trip to London with lobbyists from the title and payday lending industries, Walmart, Comcast, and Altria. Following the trip, Ohio Speaker of the House Cliff Rosenberger resigned from office after ethics concerns were raised.[10]

Elections[edit]

2016 Minnesota State Representative- House 31A[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kurt Daudt (Incumbent) 14815 70.33
DFL Sarah Udvig 6208 29.47
2014 Minnesota State Representative- House 31A[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kurt Daudt (Incumbent) 10,363 96.67
2012 Minnesota State Representative- House 31A[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kurt Daudt (Incumbent) 11,990 60.42
DFL Ryan Fiereck 7,823 39.42
2010 Minnesota State Representative- House 17A[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kurt Daudt 9,840 56.04
DFL Jim Godfrey 7,044 40.11
Constitution Paul Bergley 657 3.74

During the 2016 US Presidential election, Daudt initially gave his endorsement to the Republican nominee, Donald Trump. On October 8, 2016, he joined others in his party in rescinding his endorsement and calling for the nominee to step down.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Daudt, Kurt". Legislators Past & Present. Minnesota Legislative Reference Library. Retrieved January 10, 2013.
  2. ^ a b Kytonen, Rachel (November 10, 2010). "Kurt Daudt excited to begin next chapter in political career". ECM. Retrieved March 8, 2016.
  3. ^ Condon, Patrick (May 1, 2015). "Rookie House Speaker Daudt looks to defy odds at Capitol". Star Tribune. Star Tribune. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  4. ^ Richert, Catharine. "Speaker to be: The education of Kurt Daudt". www.mprnews.org. Retrieved 2019-03-29.
  5. ^ "Kurt Daudt for State Representative". Daudt Volunteer Committee. Retrieved January 24, 2013.
  6. ^ "Democratic doubts remain as Kurt Daudt prepares to lead Minnesota House". Pioneer Press. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  7. ^ "Cambridge man convicted in gun dispute involving Minnesota House speaker". Star Tribune. Retrieved 2019-03-29.
  8. ^ Simons, Abby (January 13, 2014). "Minority Leader Daudt acknowledges being in gun-related dust-up". Star Tribune. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  9. ^ Bakst, Brianl (March 8, 2014). "House Speaker Daudt sued by debt collectors, was tardy on taxes". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  10. ^ Carr Smyth, Julie l (April 18, 2018). "MN's Kurt Daudt among GOP leaders who took free London trip drawing scrutiny". Associated Press. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  11. ^ "Results for State Representative District 31A". Results for State Representative District 31A. Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  12. ^ "Results for State Representative District 31A". Results for State Representative District 31A. Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  13. ^ "Results for State Representative District 31A". Results for State Representative District 31A. Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  14. ^ "Results for State Representative District 17A". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  15. ^ http://www.startribune.com/trump-loses-support-of-minnesota-gop-leaders-including-u-s-rep-erik-paulsen/396411701/

External links[edit]

Minnesota House of Representatives
Preceded by
Rob Eastlund
Member of the Minnesota House of Representatives
from District 31A
17A (2011–2013)

2011–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Paul Thissen
Minority Leader of the Minnesota House of Representatives
2013–2015
Succeeded by
Paul Thissen
Preceded by
Melissa Hortman
Minority Leader of the Minnesota House of Representatives
2019–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Paul Thissen
Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives
2015–2019
Succeeded by
Melissa Hortman