L'Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards

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L'Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Program
The winners of the 2010 UNESCO-L’Oréal Prize for Women in Science Awards Ceremony at UNESCO Headquarters, Paris – From left to right; Elaine Fuchs (USA), Anne Dejean-Assémat (France), Sir Lindsay Owen-Jones, Chairman of L’Oréal, Alejandra Bravo (Mexico), Lourdes J. Cruz (Philippines), Rashika El Ridi (Egypt), Ms Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO, and Günter Blobel, Nobel Prize in Medicine 1999.
L'Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards
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Website http://www.loreal.com/Foundation/Article.aspx?topcode=Foundation_AccessibleScience_WomenExcellence_U Edit this on Wikidata

The L'Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards aim to improve the position of women in science by recognizing outstanding women researchers who have contributed to scientific progress. The awards are a result of a partnership between the French cosmetics company L'Oréal and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and carry a grant of $100,000 USD for each laureate.[1][2][3]

Each year an international jury alternates between life and material sciences and selects a winner from each of the following regions:

The same partnership awards the UNESCO-L'Oréal International Fellowships, providing up to $40,000 USD in funding over two years to fifteen young women scientists engaged in exemplary and promising research projects.[4] The Fellowship awards began in 2000[5] with a one-year award of $20,000 USD and offered ten awards until 2003. In 2003, the number of awards increased to 15 and then in 2006, the grant period extended to two years and the amount of the award increased to $40,000 USD.[6] In 2015, the name Rising Talent Grants was implemented.[7]

Recipients[edit]

1998 Laureates[edit]

2000 Laureates[edit]

2000 Fellows[edit]

2000 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[9]

2001 Laureates[edit]

2001 Fellows[edit]

2001 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[10]

2002 Laureates[edit]

2002 Fellows[edit]

2002 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[11]

2003 Laureates[edit]

2003 Fellows[edit]

2003 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries. The initial awards list stated one addition from the Pacific Rim region was pending. Other awardees are:[12]

2004 Laureates[edit]

2004 Fellows[edit]

2004 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[13]

2005 Laureates[edit]

2005 Fellows[edit]

2005 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[14]

2006 Laureates[edit]

2006 Fellows[edit]

2006 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[16]

  • Zeina Daher (Lebanon) Biochemistry: Study Of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations
  • Juana Del Valle Mendoza (Peru) Immunology: Development Of A Therapeutic Vaccine Against Hiv-1, The Virus Responsible For Aids
  • Dilfuza Egamberdiyeva (Uzbekistan) Environmental Microbiology: Development Of Environmentally Friendly, Bacteria-Based fertilizer
  • Ghada Ahmed Mohamed Abu El-Heba (Egypt) Molecular Biology: Improvement Of Nitrogen-Fixation In Leguminosae
  • Sabah Ben Fredj (Tunisia) Microbiology: Study Of The Genetic Variability Of Fungi Found On Grapes In Tunisian Vineyards
  • Valérie Gbonon (Côte d'Ivoire) Microbiology: Study Of The Virulence Factors Of Group B Streptococcus Bacteria Infections To Improve Antibiotic Treatment For Pregnant Women And Newborns
  • Stéphanie Jenouvrier (France) Ecology: The Impact Of Global Warming On The Population Dynamics Of Emperor Penguins
  • Anita Krisko (Croatia) Structural Biology: Computer Modeling To Investigate How Degradation Of Proteins In The Eye Lens Can Lead To Blindness
  • Priyadharshini Madhou (Mauritius) Plant Biotechnology: Study Of Genes Controlling Plant Resistance To Fungus Infection
  • Irene Maier (Austria) Biomedicine: Development Of An Immunological Biochip To Facilitate Clinical Diagnosis Of Food Allergies
  • Andréa Mantesso,[17] (Brazil) Health Sciences: Study Of Dental Stem Cells To Provide Innovative Solutions For Cavities And Craniofacial Deformities
  • Prudence Mutowo (Zimbabwe) Molecular Biology: Study Of Gene Regulation In Archaea
  • Mun Peak Nyon (Malaysia) Structural Biology: Determining The Three-Dimensional Structure Of Cutinase
  • Diana Pérez Staples (Mexico) Behavioral Ecology: Study Of Biological Pest Control To Reduce The Use Of Environmentally Dangerous Insecticides
  • Ruchi Singh (India) Parasitology: Identification Of Genes Involved In Drug-Resistance Of Leishmaniasis

2007 Laureates[edit]

  • Ameenah Gurib-Fakim (Mauritius): "For her exploration and analysis of plants from Mauritius and their bio-medical applications."
  • Ligia Gargallo (Chile): "For her contributions to understanding solution properties of polymers."
  • Mildred Dresselhaus (United States): "For her research on solid state materials, including conceptualizing the creation of carbon nanotubes."
  • Margaret Brimble (New Zealand): "For her contribution to the synthesis of complex natural products, especially shellfish toxins."
  • Tatiana Birshtein (Russia): "For her contribution to the understanding of the shapes, sizes and motions of large molecules."[2]

2007 Fellows[edit]

2007 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[18]

2008 Laureates[edit]

2008 Fellows[edit]

2008 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[20][21]

2009 Laureates[edit]

2009 Fellows[edit]

2009 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[24]

  • Marie Abboud (Lebanon) Non-invasive optical methods for the study of biological structures
  • Rima Al-Besharat (Syria) local probiotic bacteria for use in functional food products
  • Ishrat Bano (Pakistan) Development of magnetic nanoparticles for use in drug delivery
  • Yean Yean Chan (Malaysia) Electrochemical DNA biosensors for molecular diagnosis of infectious disease
  • Nonhlanhla Dlamani (South Africa) African traditional medicine used in the treatment of Kaposi’s sarcoma
  • Berta González Frankenberger (Mexico) speech and voice processing in neonates and premature babies
  • Cecilia Gonzales-Marin (Peru) oral infections and medical complications in pregnant women
  • Fina Kurreeman (Mauritius) Study of genes specifically associated with rheumatoid arthritis
  • Khadijetou Lekweiry (Mauritania) Transmission of malaria in the Nouakchott
  • Lydia Lynch (Ireland) human omentum as an immunological tool
  • Joan Munissi (Tanzania) Antimicrobial compounds isolated from cultures of Tanzanian marine-derived fungi
  • Ivana Pešić (Serbia) identification of urine proteins, renal disease
  • Mareike Posner (Germany) resistance of enzyme structures within organisms adapted to extreme conditions
  • Jingyi Shi (China) Genetics of acute myeloid leukemia
  • Paula Villar (Argentina) computer-based model of the heart in 3D

2010 Laureates[edit]

2010 Fellows[edit]

2010 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[27]

2011 Laureates[edit]

2011 Fellows[edit]

2011 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[29]

2012 Laureates[edit]

2012 Fellows[edit]

2011 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[31]

2013 Laureates[edit]

  • Francisca Nneka Okeke (Africa and the Arab States): "for her significant contributions to the understanding of daily variations of the ion currents in the upper atmosphere which may further our understanding of climate change."[32]
  • Reiko Kuroda (Asia-Pacific): "for discovering the functional importance of the difference between left handed and right handed molecules which has wide applications including research on neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's."[33]
  • Pratibha Gai (Europe): "for ingeniously modifying her electron microscope so that she was able to observe chemical reactions occurring at surface atoms of catalysts which will help scientists in their development of new medicines or new energy sources."[34]
  • Marcia Barbosa (Latin America): "for discovering one of the peculiarities of water which may lead to better understanding of how earthquakes occur and how proteins fold which is important for the treatment of diseases."[35]
  • Deborah S. Jin (North America): "for having been the first to cool down molecules so much that she can observe chemical reactions in slow motion which may help further understanding of molecular processes which are important for medicine or new energy sources."[36][37]

2013 Fellows[edit]

2013 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[38]

2014 Laureates[edit]

2014 Fellows[edit]

2014 Fellowships awarded yearly to doctoral and post-doctoral women to allow them to pursue their research in host laboratories outside their home countries are:[40]

2015 Laureates[edit]

  • Rajaâ Cherkaoui El Moursli (Africa and the Arab States): "For her key contribution to one of the greatest discoveries in physics: proof of the existence of the Higgs Boson, the particle responsible for the creation of mass in the universe."
  • Xie Yi (Asia-Pacific): "For her significant contributions to inorganic solid state solvothermal chemistry at the nanoscale, particularly unconventional semi-conductor materials and graphene-like structures a few atoms thick."
  • Dame Carol Robinson (Europe): "For her groundbreaking work in macromolecular mass spectrometry and pioneering gas phase structural biology by probing the structure and reactivity of single proteins and protein complexes, including membrane proteins."
  • Thaisa Storchi Bergmann (Latin America): "For her outstanding work on super-massive black holes in the centers of galaxies and their associated regions of dense gas, dust, and young stars surrounding them, as well as their role in the evolution of galaxies."
  • Molly S. Shoichet (North America): "For her pioneering work on advanced laser photochemistry for creating 3D patterns in hydrogels that enable regeneration of nerve tissue."[41]

2015 International Rising Talents[edit]

Established in 2015, the International Rising Talent Grants are awarded annually to 15 PhD students and post-doctoratal Fellows. Fellows are chosen from among the winners of the 236 fellowships awarded locally by L’Oréal subsidiaries and UNESCO around the world, to give additional support at the international level to promising young women researchers.[42] They replace the former International Fellowships. The 2015 International Rising Talents are:[7]

2016 Laureates[edit]

Prof Karim took the Africa/Arabia award

2016 International Rising Talents[edit]

The L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science programme established the International Rising Talent Grants, awarded annually to 15 PhD students and post-doctoral Fellows who are chosen among the former winners of the 236 fellowships awarded locally by L’Oréal subsidiaries and UNESCO around the world. The goal is to support promising women researchers and give them more visibility so that, through the awards, these young scientists can achieve the increased recognition that their talent deserve, but dod not always receive, both within their country and by their peers. International Rising Talents are chosen from countries in each world region, Africa & Arab States, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America and North America. The 2016 L'Oréal-UNESCO International Rising Talents are:[45][46]

Technology and engineering: innovations that could change the face of medicine

Physical sciences: a profound impact on our world

The study of galaxy mergers with implications for a new understanding of how galaxies evolve

Life and environmental sciences: critical issues for the future of our planet

Solutions in health sciences through modern medicine

2017 Laureates[edit]

  • Niveen Khashab (Saudi Arabia) "For her contributions to innovative smart hybrid materials aimed at drug delivery and for developing new techniques to monitor intracellular antioxidant activity."
  • Michelle Simmons (Australia) "For her pioneering contributions to quantum and atomic electronics, constructing atomic transistors en route to quantum computers."
  • Nicola Spaldin (Switzerland) "For her groundbreaking multidisciplinary work predicting, describing and creating new materials that have switchable magnetic and ferroelectric properties."
  • Zhenan Bao (USA) "For her outstanding contribution to and mastery of the development of novel functional polymers for consumer electronics, energy storage and biomedical applications."
  • Maria Teresa Ruiz (Chile) "For her discovery of the first brown dwarf and her seminal work on understanding the faintest stars, including stars at the final stages of their evolution (white dwarfs)." [47]

2017 International Rising Talents[edit]

In 2014, the L’Oréal-UNESCO programme has established the International Rising Talent Grants, awarded annually to 15 PhD students and post-doctoral Fellows. These young researchers are chosen among the former winners of the 250 fellowships awarded locally by L’Oréal subsidiaries and UNESCO Field Offices around the world. By recognizing their achievements at a key moment in their careers, the For Women in Science programme aims to help them pursue their research.[48][49]

Watching the brain at work
  • Doctor Lorina NACI, Canada, Fundamental medicine. In a coma: is the patient conscious or unconscious?
  • Associate Professor Muireann Irish, Australia, Clinical medicine. Recognizing Alzheimer’s before the first signs appear.

On the road to conceiving new medical treatments

  • Doctor Hyun Lee, Germany, Biological Sciences. Neurodegenerative diseases: untangling aggregated proteins.
  • Doctor Nam-Kyung Yu, Republic of Korea, Biological Sciences, Rett syndrome: neuronal cells come under fire
  • Doctor Stephanie Fanucchi, South Africa, Biological Sciences. Better understanding the immune system.
  • Doctor Julia Etulain, Argentina, Biological Sciences. Better tissue healing.

Finding potential new sources of drugs

  • Doctor Rym Ben Sallem, Tunisia, Biological Sciences. New antibiotics are right under our feet.
  • Doctor Hab Joanna Sulkowska, Poland, Biological Sciences. Unraveling the secrets of entangled proteins.

Getting to the heart of matter

  • Ms Nazek El-Atab, United Arab Emirates, Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering. Miniaturizing electronics without losing memory.
  • Doctor Bilge Demirkoz, Turkey, Physics. Piercing the secrets of cosmic radiation.
  • Doctor Tamara Elzein, Lebanon, Material Sciences. Trapping radioactivity.
  • Doctor Ran Long, China, Chemistry. Unlocking the potential of energy resources with nanochemistry.

Examining the past to shed light on the future – or vice versa

  • Doctor Fernanda Werneck, Brazil, Biological Sciences. Predicting how animal biodiversity will evolve.
  • Doctor Sam Giles, United Kingdom, Biological Sciences. Taking another look at the evolution of vertebrates thanks to their braincases.
  • Doctor Ágnes Kóspál, Hungary, Astronomy and Space Sciences. Looking at the birth of distant suns and planets to better understand the solar system.

2018 Laureates[edit]

  • Heather Zar (South Africa) Medicine and Health Sciences/Pediatrics “For establishing a cutting-edge research programme in pneumonia, tuberculosis and asthma, saving the lives of many children worldwide.”
  • Meemann Chang (China) Biological Sciences/Paleontology, “For her pioneering work on fossil records leading to insights on how aquatic vertebrates adapted to life on land.”
  • Caroline Dean (United Kingdom) Biological Sciences/Molecular biology “For her groundbreaking research on how plants adapt to their surroundings and climate change, leading to new ways for crop improvement.”
  • Amy T. Austin (Argentina) Ecology and Environmental sciences “For her remarkable contributions to understanding terrestrial ecosystem ecology in natural and human-modified landscapes.”
  • Janet Rossant (Canada) Biological Sciences/Developmental biology, “For her outstanding research that helped us to better understand how tissues and organs are formed in the developing embryo.”[50]

2018 International Rising Talents[edit]

Each year, the International Rising Talents programme selects the 15 most promising women scientists among the 275 national and regional fellows of the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women In Science programme. These young women are the very future of science and recognizing their excellence will help ensure that they reach their full potential.[51]

[52]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kevin Friedl, "For Women in Science", Seed Magazine, March 8, 2006
  2. ^ a b "Five outstanding women scientists receive L'Oréal-UNESCO Awards for Women in Science 2007". UNESCOPRESS. 2007-03-02. Archived from the original on 2015-04-12. Retrieved 2015-11-15. 
  3. ^ "L'Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science". YouTube. 2013-04-03. Retrieved 2013-05-13. 
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  5. ^ "UNESCO-L'Oréal Fellowships, 2012". Geneva, Switzerland: UNESCO. 2012. Retrieved 16 November 2015. 
  6. ^ "UNESCO partnership with the Private Sector". Geneva, Switzerland: UNESCO. Retrieved 16 November 2015. 
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  8. ^ a b DNA researcher Okazaki wins int'l award for female scientists., the Free Library, 5 April 2015
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  17. ^ "Andrea Mantesso – Google Scholar Citations". Retrieved 13 September 2016. 
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  47. ^ Announcement of Laureates of 2017 L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards
  48. ^ https://en.unesco.org/news/oreal-and-unesco-recognize-15-young-women-researchers-their-outstanding-contribution-science The l'Oréal Foundation and UNESCO recognize 15 young women researchers for their outstanding contribution to science
  49. ^ http://www.unesco.org/new/en/natural-sciences/priority-areas/gender-and-science/for-women-in-science-programme/2017-international-rising-talents/ 2017 International Rising Talents (Source: UNESCO)
  50. ^ https://en.unesco.org/news/five-laureates-named-2018-oreal-unesco-women-science-awards Five Laureates Named for 2018 L’ORÉAL-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards
  51. ^ https://en.unesco.org/women-in-science-rising-irt-2018 International Rising Talents 2018 (Source: UNESCO)
  52. ^ https://en.unesco.org/news/2018-laureates-mark-20th-anniversary-oreal-unesco-women-science-programme 2018 Laureates mark 20th Anniversary of L’Oréal-UNESCO for Women in Science Programme

External links[edit]