Lünen

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Lünen
View with the bridge on the River Lippe
View with the bridge on the River Lippe
Coat of arms of Lünen
Coat of arms
Location of Lünen within Unna district
Lünen in UN.svg
Lünen is located in Germany
Lünen
Lünen
Lünen is located in North Rhine-Westphalia
Lünen
Lünen
Coordinates: 51°37′N 7°31′E / 51.617°N 7.517°E / 51.617; 7.517Coordinates: 51°37′N 7°31′E / 51.617°N 7.517°E / 51.617; 7.517
CountryGermany
StateNorth Rhine-Westphalia
Admin. regionArnsberg
DistrictUnna
Subdivisions14 Stadtteile
Government
 • MayorJürgen Kleine-Frauns (GfL)
Area
 • Total59.18 km2 (22.85 sq mi)
Elevation
58 m (190 ft)
Population
 (2017-12-31)[1]
 • Total86,465
 • Density1,500/km2 (3,800/sq mi)
Time zoneCET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes
44532, 44534, 44536
Dialling codes02306, 0231
Vehicle registrationUN, LÜN
Websitewww.luenen.de

Lünen is a town in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located north of Dortmund, on both banks of the River Lippe. It is the largest town of the Unna district and part of the Ruhr Area.

In 2009 a biogas plant was built to provide electric power to the city. Lünen is the first city in the world to receive electricity via public utility companies that is generated on the base of animal waste.[2] The plant produces up to 6.6 MW, supplying 26,000 homes with heat and electricity.[3]

Personalities[edit]

Berlin 1966: Hans Scharoun (right), Otto Nagel (left)
  • Max Simon (1899–1961), SS officer and war criminal

Culture and main sights[edit]

Saint George's Church

Structure

  • Saint George's Church
  • Saint Mary's Church
  • Chateau of Schwansbell
  • Colani-UFO
  • Freiherr-vom-Stein School
  • Town hall of Lünen
  • Geschwister-Scholl School
  • Industrial Monument "Moor Crane"

Museum

  • Museum of the town Lünen
  • Mining Museum in Lünen South
  • Mining residential Museum in Lünen Brambauer

Theatre

  • Heinz-Hilpert theater

Twin towns[edit]

Lünen is twinned with:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bevölkerung der Gemeinden Nordrhein-Westfalens am 31. Dezember 2017" (in German). Landesbetrieb Information und Technik NRW. Retrieved 2018-09-21.
  2. ^ Poo power to the people – The Guardian
  3. ^ "German city uses waste to generate green energy". BSDLive. 2009-05-28. Retrieved 2009-06-09.