LCDR R class

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LCDR R class
Tonbridge Locomotive Depot geograph-2652585-by-Ben-Brooksbank.jpg
No. 1675 at Tonbridge Locomotive Depot, 18 May 1946
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer William Kirtley
Builder Sharp, Stewart & Co
Serial number 3722–3739
Build date September–December 1891
Total produced 18
Specifications
Configuration:
 • Whyte 0-4-4T
 • UIC B2′ n2t
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Driver dia. 5 ft 6 in (1.676 m)
Wheelbase 21 ft 6 in (6.55 m)
Loco weight 49.75 long tons (50.55 t)
Fuel capacity 2 long tons (2.0 t)
Water cap 1,100 imp gal (5,000 l; 1,300 US gal)
Firebox:
 • Firegrate area
16.25 sq ft (1.510 m2)
Boiler pressure 150 psi (1.03 MPa)
Heating surface 1,071 sq ft (99.5 m2)
Cylinders Two, inside
Cylinder size 17 in × 24 in (432 mm × 610 mm)
Train brakes Westinghouse
Career
Operators
Class R
Numbers
  • LCDR: 199–216
  • SECR: 658–675
  • SR: A658–A675 → 1658–1675
  • BR: 31658–31675
Nicknames Bobtails
Withdrawn May 1940 – December 1955
Disposition All scrapped

The LCDR R class was a class of 0-4-4T locomotives on the London, Chatham and Dover Railway (LCDR). No. 207 (eventually no. 31666) is notable as being the last former LCDR locomotive to be withdrawn from service.[1] The whole class was fitted with condensing apparatus for working on the Widened Lines.[2]

History[edit]

For many years the London, Chatham and Dover Railway (LCDR) had favoured the 0-4-4T wheel arrangement for suburban and stopping passenger trains, and when more were required in 1890, consideration was given to ordering a further batch of the existing A2 class 0-4-4T (introduced 1883); it was then decided that a modified design was required.[3] The R class locomotives were designed by William Kirtley as a development of his earlier A2 class,[3] and 18 were built by Sharp, Stewart & Co in 1891.[4][5]

Numbering[edit]

Their LCDR numbers were 199–216, which under the South Eastern and Chatham Railway became 658–675 from 1899.[4] They were renumbered three more times: to A658–A675 by the Southern Railway (SR) from 1923; to 1658–1675 by the SR from 1931; and to 31658–31675 by British Railways from 1948.

Withdrawal[edit]

Three (nos. 1664, 1668 & 1669) were withdrawn in 1940 to provides spares for the others,[1] and withdrawal of the rest occurred between 1949 and 1955.[6]

Table of withdrawals[7]
Year Quantity in
service at
start of year
Quantity
withdrawn
Numbers
1940 18 3 1664, 1668, 1669
1949 15 1 31672
1951 14 3 31659, 31667, 31670
1952 11 5 31658, 31665, 31673–31675
1953 6 3 31660, 31662, 31663
1954 3 1 31671
1955 2 2 31661, 31666

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bradley 1979, p. 87.
  2. ^ Smith 1994, p. 25.
  3. ^ a b Bradley 1979, pp. 82–83.
  4. ^ a b Bradley 1979, p. 83.
  5. ^ Bradley 1979, pp. 87–88.
  6. ^ Bradley 1979, pp. 87-88.
  7. ^ Bradley 1960, p. 33.

References[edit]

  • Bradley, D.L. (March 1979) [1960]. The Locomotive History of the London, Chatham & Dover Railway (2nd ed.). London: RCTS. ISBN 0-901115-47-9. 
  • Bradley, D.L. (1960). The Locomotives of the London, Chatham & Dover Railway (1st ed.). London: RCTS. 
  • Smith, Martin (1994). Steam on the Underground. Ian Allan Publishing. ISBN 0-7110-2282-8.