LSWR T3 class

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LSWR T3 class
Steam Train at Shildon.jpg
T3 class 4-4-0 No. 563 on display at the Shildon Locomotion Museum.
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer William Adams
Builder LSWR Nine Elms Works
Build date 1892–1893
Total produced 20
Specifications
Configuration 4-4-0
UIC class 2'Bn
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Leading dia. 3 ft 7 in (1.092 m)
Driver dia. 6 ft 7 in (2.007 m)
Length 54 ft 2 38 in (16.52 m)
Height 13 ft 2 34 in (4.03 m)
Axle load 15.725 long tons (16.0 t)
Adhesive weight 35.525 long tons (36.1 t)
Loco weight 48.55 long tons (49.3 t)
Tender weight 36.2 long tons (36.8 t)
Fuel type Coal
Fuel capacity 3.00 long tons (3.05 t)
Water cap 3,300 imp gal (15,000 l; 4,000 US gal)
Boiler pressure 175 psi (1.21 MPa)
Cylinders Two, outside
Cylinder size 19 in × 26 in (483 mm × 660 mm)
Performance figures
Tractive effort 17,673 lbf (78.6 kN)
Career
Operators LSWR · SR
Class T3
Power class SR: I
Withdrawn 1930–1945
Disposition One preserved, remainder scrapped

The LSWR T3 class was a class of express passenger 4-4-0 steam locomotives designed for the London and South Western Railway by William Adams. Twenty were constructed between 1892–1893.

The class were numbered 557–576, and had been intended as a variant of the X2 class with slightly smaller driving wheels (6 ft 7 in or 2.007 m versus 7 ft 1 in or 2.159 m). In reality, the coupled wheelbase was lengthened by 6 inches (150 mm) and the locomotive was fitted with a firebox 6 feet 10 inches (2.08 m) deep – the largest firebox of any of Adams' designs.[1]

Table of locomotive orders
Year Order Quantity LSWR Numbers Notes
1892 T3 10 557–566
1893 S5 10 567–576

All passed to the Southern Railway at the grouping in 1923. Withdrawals started in 1930, and by the end of 1933 only three remained. No. 557 went in 1936, 571 in 1943, and the last, 563 was retired in August 1945 and set aside for preservation. Its permanent home is the Shildon Locomotion Museum in England. From May to October 2011 it was in Toronto, Ontario, on loan for use in a theatrical production of The Railway Children at Roundhouse Park, a role it reprised in January 2015 when the production was staged at Kings Cross, London.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Russell (1991) p. 175
  2. ^ Kennedy, Maev (16 January 2015). "Why loco is true star of Railway Children". The Guardian. p. 19. Retrieved 16 January 2015. 
  3. ^ "THE TRAIN & COACH". railwaychildrenlondon.com. 
  • Russell, J. H. (1991). A Pictorial Record of Southern Locomotives. OPC-Haynes. pp. 175–178. 

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