LaFarr Stuart

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LaFarr Stuart
Born(1934-07-06)July 6, 1934
DiedJuly 26, 2021(2021-07-26) (aged 87)
OccupationComputer engineering (retired)
Websitewww.zyvra.org/lafarr

LaFarr Stuart (born July 6, 1934 in Clarkston, Utah), was an early computer music pioneer, computer engineer and member of the Homebrew Computer Club.

Career[edit]

Computer music[edit]

In 1961, Stuart programmed Iowa State University's Cyclone computer, a derivative of the ILLIAC, to play simple, recognizable tunes through an amplified speaker that had been attached to the system originally for administrative and diagnostic purposes. A recording of an interview with Stuart and his computer music was broadcast nationally on the National Broadcasting Company's NBC Radio Network program Monitor on February 10, 1962.

In a subsequent interview with the Harold Journal, Navel Hunsaker, head of the Utah State University mathematics department, said of Stuart, "He always was a whiz with calculators."

From the late 1970s, Stuart mentored John Carlsen, who later contributed to the rapid growth of personal computer (PC) sound-card maker Media Vision and to SigmaTel.

Control Data[edit]

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Stuart worked for Control Data Corporation (CDC), where Seymour Cray designed the CDC 6600, the first commercial supercomputer.

Forth[edit]

During the 1970s, Stuart created a version of the programming language Forth, which became known as LaFORTH.[1] It is notable for its implementation without an input buffer.[2]

Zytrex[edit]

In the 1980s, Stuart worked for Zytrex, which manufactured complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) Programmable Array Logic (PAL) programmable logic devices (PLDs).

Real-time clocks[edit]

Stuart conceived installing battery-operated real-time clocks into computers, for which he received royalty payments until nearly 2000. Stuart jokingly admits contributing to the Year 2000 problem.

Preserving computer history[edit]

Stuart owns the first Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) PDP-11 to enter California and often visits the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stuart, LaFarr. "My Forth and Mathematical Stuff". Zyvra.org. Retrieved 2020-03-30.
  2. ^ Brodie, Leo (27 December 2004). Thinking Forth. Punchy Publishing. ISBN 9780976458708. Retrieved 2020-03-30.

External links[edit]