LaGuardia Houses

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LaGuardia Houses
Nychales.JPG
Location in New York City
Coordinates: 40°42′45″N 73°59′14″W / 40.712630°N 73.987260°W / 40.712630; -73.987260Coordinates: 40°42′45″N 73°59′14″W / 40.712630°N 73.987260°W / 40.712630; -73.987260
CountryUnited States
StateNew York
CityNew York City
BoroughManhattan
Area
 • Total0.016 sq mi (0.04 km2)
Population
 • Total2,513 [1]
ZIP codes
10002
Area code(s)212, 332, 646, and 917
Websitemy.nycha.info/DevPortal/

Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia Houses, also known as LaGuardia Houses, is a public housing development built and maintained by the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.[3] Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia Houses is composed of thirteen buildings, all of which are sixteen stories tall.[3][4] The buildings have 1,093 apartments and house approximately 2,596 people. The complex occupies 10.96 acres (4.44 ha), and is bordered by Madison Street to the north, Montgomery Street to the east, Cherry Street to the south, and Rutgers Street to the west.[3] LaGuardia Houses Addition is a sixteen-story tower for elderly people at the corner of Jefferson Street and Cherry Street.[5][6]

Development[edit]

Between the construction of LaGuardia Houses and Baruch Houses, 1,650 people were displaced in 1953–1954.[7] Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia Houses was completed July 31, 1957 and the nine buildings were designed by Hyman Isaac Feldman.[3][8] LaGuardia Houses Addition was completed in 1965 and was designed by Emanuel Turano.[9][6] The development is named after Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the 99th Mayor of New York City who created the New York City Housing Authority and, although he was a Republican and President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a Democrat, worked closely with President Roosevelt to gain federal funding for projects throughout New York City.[3]

The property was damaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 by saltwater flooding 6-24 inches on the ground floors of four buildings. In 2015, it received part of $3 billion aid from the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) for NYCHA properties.[10]

In 2017, NYCHA began soliciting proposals from developers to build affordable and market-rate housing units at LaGuardia Houses as part of the agency' part "NextGeneration Neighborhoods" program intended to fund repairs. It was estimated that the development needs $70 million in capital improvements.[11] Construction is planned to begin in 2019.[12]

As of 2010, Jessica Thomas is the current Resident Association President for Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia Houses and Carmelo Lopez is the current Resident Association President for LaGuardia Houses Addition.[13]

Notable residents[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "LaGuardia Houses Population".
  2. ^ "LaGuardia Houses Area". Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Laguardia & Addition". NYCHA Housing Developments. New York: New York City Housing Authority. Retrieved January 16, 2010.
  4. ^ "Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia, New York City". Emporis.com. Emporis Corporation. Retrieved January 17, 2010.
  5. ^ "Guide to applying for public housing". New York City Housing Authority. Retrieved January 16, 2010.
  6. ^ a b "Laguardia Houses Addition, New York City, U.S.A." Emporis.com. Emporis Corporation. Retrieved January 17, 2010.
  7. ^ Mele, Christopher (2000). "3". Selling the Lower East Side: culture, real estate, and resistance in New York City. Globalization and community. 5 (illustrated ed.). Twin Cities: University of Minnesota Press. p. 118. ISBN 978-0-8166-3182-7. Retrieved January 16, 2010.
  8. ^ "Hyman Isaac Feldman". Emporis.com. Emporis Corporation. Retrieved January 17, 2010.
  9. ^ "Laguardia Houses Addition, New York City". Skyscraperpage.com. Skyscraper Source Media, LLC. Retrieved January 17, 2010.
  10. ^ Villasenor, Maria. "NYCHA moved family to another site after Hurricane Sandy, then hit by leak and mold: 'No one helped us'". nydailynews.com. Retrieved July 8, 2019.
  11. ^ "NYCHA to Bring Mixed Market Rate, Affordable Housing to LaGuardia Houses". DNAinfo New York. Retrieved July 8, 2019.
  12. ^ "Why NYCHA Chose LaGuardia Houses for 35-Story 'NextGen' Infill". Bowery Boogie. June 5, 2017. Retrieved July 8, 2019.
  13. ^ "Manhattan South District CCOP Office". Residents' Corner. New York: New York City Housing Authority. Archived from the original on June 13, 2010. Retrieved January 17, 2010.
  14. ^ Myers, Steven Lee (December 2, 1993). "Woman in the News; At Center of a Sweeping Struggle: Ninfa Segarra". New York Times. Retrieved July 8, 2019.

External links[edit]