La Chapelle-Réanville

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La Chapelle-Réanville
Town hall
Town hall
Coat of arms of La Chapelle-Réanville
Coat of arms
La Chapelle-Réanville is located in France
La Chapelle-Réanville
La Chapelle-Réanville
Coordinates: 49°05′46″N 1°22′41″E / 49.0961°N 1.3781°E / 49.0961; 1.3781Coordinates: 49°05′46″N 1°22′41″E / 49.0961°N 1.3781°E / 49.0961; 1.3781
Country France
Region Normandy
Department Eure
Arrondissement Évreux
Canton Vernon-Nord
Intercommunality Portes de l'Eure
Government
 • Mayor (2008–2014) André Turc
Area1 8.07 km2 (3.12 sq mi)
Population (2008)2 1,138
 • Density 140/km2 (370/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
INSEE/Postal code 27150 / 27950
Elevation 59–137 m (194–449 ft)
(avg. 125 m or 410 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

La Chapelle-Réanville is a commune in the Eure department in northern France.

Population[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1793 172 —    
1800 169 −1.7%
1806 176 +4.1%
1821 173 −1.7%
1831 162 −6.4%
1836 160 −1.2%
1841 169 +5.6%
1846 339 +100.6%
1851 349 +2.9%
1856 295 −15.5%
1861 306 +3.7%
1866 294 −3.9%
1872 301 +2.4%
1876 313 +4.0%
1881 270 −13.7%
1886 267 −1.1%
1891 253 −5.2%
1896 259 +2.4%
1901 270 +4.2%
1906 275 +1.9%
1911 264 −4.0%
1921 216 −18.2%
1926 209 −3.2%
1931 205 −1.9%
1936 183 −10.7%
1946 199 +8.7%
1954 214 +7.5%
1962 185 −13.6%
1968 179 −3.2%
1975 603 +236.9%
1982 1,030 +70.8%
1990 1,031 +0.1%
1999 1,019 −1.2%
2008 1,138 +11.7%

Nancy Cunard, English heiress to the Cunard Line, activist and writer, moved into a small farmhouse, Le Puits Carré (The Four-Cornered Well), just outside the village in 1928. Soon after this Henry Crowder, American Jazz musician, came to stay with Cunard when she relocated her Hours Press to the farm's outbuildings. She removed the press to Paris in 1930 but continued to own the farmhouse with frequent visits. Looted by German soldiers in the Second World War while Cunard was in London, she sold the property after the liberation. Later the main house was destroyed by fire and the site remains abandoned.[1]

See also[edit]

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