Mountain Warfare Training Camp Michael Monsoor

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Coordinates: 32°40′N 116°26′W / 32.667°N 116.433°W / 32.667; -116.433 Mountain Warfare Training Camp Michael Monsoor (formerly known as La Posta Mountain Warfare Training Facility), located at 3,500 ft (1,100 m) elevation 50 miles (80 km) east of San Diego, near the unincorporated community of Campo, in San Diego County, is a 1,063 acres (4 km2) training facility used by the Naval Special Warfare Center.

History[edit]

The 1,063 acres (4 km2) site has a firing range, an administration building, barracks, and a 5,000 m length mountain endurance training course. The Navy has operated on the 1,300 acres (5 km2) plus acres since the early 1960s, and is seeking to set aside an additional 4,486 acres (18.15 km2) of federal Bureau of Land Management property for the facility. The Mountain Warfare Training Facility served as a satellite tracking station for many years until current technology made the giant tracking dishes obsolete. The property was reconfigured as a training center when the station was shut down in 1986.

Operations[edit]

In 1998, Naval Base Coronado gave permission for the Naval Special Warfare Command to use the site for mountain warfare training of the Naval Special Warfare Group One which trains its SEAL and SDV teams there, and conducts BUD/S classes.

The La Posta Navy Mountain Warfare Training Facility plays a critical role in military training because the area’s land and terrain closely resemble the environments found in Korea and parts of Iraq and Afghanistan.[1]

Its close proximity to most military bases in San Diego County allows for maximum training time with limited travel time and expense for its Group One.[2] The unencumbered area around La Posta and its proximity to the Laguna Mountains makes it an ideal location for special reconnaissance training, map and compass training, and other specialized special warfare training. Camp Michael Monsoor, like San Clemente Island, is one of the few places that allow special forces to train in a real life environment with limited encroachment problems.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1] Conservationists and Navy join forces to preserve open space
  2. ^ p.116, Hollenbeck, Couch
  • Cliff Hollenbeck, Dick Couch, To Be A U.S. Navy Seal, Zenith Imprint, 2003 ISBN 0-7603-1404-7

External links[edit]