Lac La Biche-St. Paul

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Lac La Biche-St. Paul
Alberta electoral district
Whereislaclabichestpaul.png
2004 boundaries
Defunct provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Alberta
District created 1993
District abolished 2012
First contested 1993
Last contested 2008

Lac La Biche-St. Paul was a provincial electoral district for the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, Canada.

Lac La Biche-St. Paul history[edit]

Boundary history[edit]

When created, the riding contained Lakeland County and the County of St. Paul No. 19 and all communities contained within, and was later expanded to include Two Hills. There were no boundary changes upon its replacement with Lac La Biche-St. Paul-Two Hills for the 2012 election.

Representation history[edit]

Members of the Legislative Assembly for
Lac La Biche-St. Paul
Assembly Years Member Party
See Athabasca-Lac La Biche and St. Paul before 1993
23rd 1993 - 1994 Paul Langevin Liberal
1994 - 1995 Independent
1995 - 1997 Progressive
Conservative
24th 1997 - 2001
25th 2001 - 2004 Ray Danyluk
26th 2004 - 2008
27th 2008 - 2012
See Lac La Biche-St. Paul-Two Hills 2012-present

The riding's first representative was Paul Langevin, a franco-Albertan elected for the Liberals. He left the Liberal caucus the following year, and went on to join the governing Progressive Conservatives. He was re-elected under their banner in 1997.

Upon Langevin's retirement, the riding was won by PC candidate Ray Danyluk, who served as Alberta's Minister of Municipal Affairs, and afterwards the Minister of Infrastructure. After three terms, he was defeated in the newly-renamed riding of Lac La Biche-St. Paul-Two Hills by Wildrose candidate Shayne Saskiw in the 2012 election.

General Election results[edit]

Alberta general election, 1993[edit]

Alberta general election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal Paul Langevin 5,041 50.73%
Progressive Conservative John Trefanko 3,897 39.22%
New Democratic Eugene Houle 999 10.05%
Total valid votes 9,937 100.00%
Liberal pickup new district.

Alberta general election, 1997[edit]

Alberta general election, 1997
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Paul Langevin 4,799 53.88% +14.66%
Liberal Vital Ouellette 2,901 32.57% -18.16%
Social Credit Peter Tychkowsky 483 5.42%
New Democratic Grace Johnston 419 4.70% -5.35%
Forum Don Ronaghan 191 2.14%
Independent Louis Real Theriault 114 1.28%
Total valid votes 8,907 100.00%
Progressive Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +16.41%

Alberta general election, 2001[edit]

Alberta general election, 2001
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Ray Danyluk 5,335 60.04% +6.16%
Liberal Vital Ouellette 3,195 35.96% +3.39%
New Democratic John Williams 356 4.01% -0.69%
Total valid votes 8,886 100.00%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +1.39%

Alberta general election, 2004[edit]

Alberta general election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%[2]
Progressive Conservative Ray Danyluk 4,896 53.64% -6.40%
Liberal Dickson Broomfield 1,879 20.59% -15.37%
Alberta Alliance Oscar Lacombe 1,703 18.66%
New Democratic Phil Goebel 649 7.11% +3.10%
Total valid votes 9,127 100.00%
Rejected, spoiled and declined 50
Electors/turnout 18,349 49.74%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +4.49%

Alberta general election, 2008[edit]

Alberta general election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Ray Danyluk 6,527 71.28% +17.64%
Liberal Alex Broadbent 1,627 17.77% -2.82%
New Democratic Della Dury 1,003 10.95% +3.84%
Total valid votes 9,157 100.00%
Rejected, spoiled and declined 74
Electors/turnout 20,872 44.23% -5.51%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +10.23%

Senate Nominee Elections[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election results: Lac La Biche-St. Paul[3] Turnout 48.88%
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Votes % Ballots 'Rank
  Progressive Conservative Betty Unger 3,417 14.60% 45.88% 2
  Progressive Conservative Bert Brown 3,165 13.52% 42.50% 1
  Independent Link Byfield 2,683 11.46% 36.03% 4
  Progressive Conservative Cliff Breitkreuz 2,517 10.75% 33.80% 3
Alberta Alliance Michael Roth 2,142 9.15% 28.76% 7
Alberta Alliance Gary Horan 2,127 9.09% 28.56% 10
Alberta Alliance Vance Gough 2,054 8.77% 27.58% 8
  Progressive Conservative David Usherwood 1,924 8.22% 25.84% 6
  Progressive Conservative Jim Silye 1,897 8.10% 25.47% 5
  Independent Tom Sindlinger 1,483 6.34% 19.91% 9
Total Votes 23,409 100%
Total Ballots 7,447 3.14 Votes Per Ballot
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 1,571

Voters had the option of selecting 4 Candidates on the Ballot

2004 Student Vote[edit]

Participating Schools[4]
Ecole Mallaig School

On November 19, 2004 a Student Vote was conducted at participating Alberta schools to parallel the 2004 Alberta general election results. The vote was designed to educate students and simulate the electoral process for persons who have not yet reached the legal majority. The vote was conducted in 80 of the 83 provincial electoral districts with students voting for actual election candidates. Schools with a large student body that reside in another electoral district had the option to vote for candidates outside of the electoral district then where they were physically located.

2004 Alberta Student Vote results[5]
Affiliation Candidate Votes %
  Progressive Conservative Ray Danyluk 80 65.04%
  Liberal Dickson Broomfield 21 17.07%
  NDP Phil Goebel 20 16.26%
Alberta Alliance Oscar Lacombe 2 1.63%
Total 123 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 3

References[edit]

  1. ^ "E‑4.1". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 2003. pp. 49–53. 
  2. ^ "Lac La Biche-St. Paul Statement of Official Results 2004 Alberta general election" (PDF). Elections Alberta. Retrieved September 11, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Senate Nominee Election 2004 Tabulation of Official Results" (PDF). Elections Alberta. Retrieved February 28, 2010. 
  4. ^ "School by School results". Student Vote Canada. Archived from the original on October 5, 2007. Retrieved 2008-04-27. 
  5. ^ "Riding by Riding Results - the Candidates". Student Vote Canada. Archived from the original on October 6, 2007. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 

External links[edit]