Laccospadix

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Atherton palm
Queensland kentia
Laccospadix australasica in the Herberton Range.jpg
Laccospadix australasicus, Herberton Range
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
(unranked): Commelinids
Order: Arecales
Family: Arecaceae
Subfamily: Arecoideae
Tribe: Areceae
Genus: Laccospadix
H.Wendl. & Drude[1]
Species: L. australasicus
Binomial name
Laccospadix australasicus
H.Wendl. & Drude
Synonyms[2]
  • Calyptrocalyx australasicus (H.Wendl. & Drude) Hook.f.
  • Ptychosperma laccospadix Benth.
  • Calyptrocalyx laccospadix F.M.Bailey

Laccospadix is a monotypic genus of flowering plant in the palm endemic to Queensland.[2] Only one species is known, Laccospadix australasicus, commonly called Atherton palm or Queensland kentia. The two Greek words from which it is named translate to "reservoir" and "spadix".

Description[edit]

Laccospadix australasicus may be solitary or clustering, in the former the trunks will grow to around 10 cm in width while clustering plants are closer to 5 cm wide. The trunks may be dark green to almost black at the base, lightening with age, and conspicuously ringed by leaf scars. Lone trunks will reach 7 m in height while the suckering varieties grow to 3.5 m. The leaves are pinnate, emerging erect with a slight arch, to 2 m on 1 m or less petioles; the petioles and rachises are usually covered in scales. The new foliage is often red to bronze, a feature more common in solitary individuals.[3]

The inflorescence is a long, unbranched spike, emerging within the leaf crown, to a meter long, carrying male and female flowers, both with three sepals and three longer petals. Laccospadix fruit is slightly ovoid, one-seeded and bright red, with a smooth epicarp and a thin fleshy mesocarp.[4]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

Found in Queensland, Australia at elevations of 800–1400 m in humid rain forest, they grow on mountains and plateau where they receive little light.

References[edit]

  1. ^ H. A. Wendland and Drude Nachrichten von der Georg-Agustus-Universität 1875:59. 1875. Type: L. australasica
  2. ^ a b Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
  3. ^ Riffle, Robert L. and Craft, Paul (2003) An Encyclopedia of Cultivated Palms. Portland: Timber Press. ISBN 0-88192-558-6 / ISBN 978-0-88192-558-6
  4. ^ Uhl, Natalie W. and Dransfield, John (1987) Genera Palmarum - A classification of palms based on the work of Harold E. Moore. Lawrence, Kansas: Allen Press. ISBN 0-935868-30-5 / ISBN 978-0-935868-30-2

External links[edit]