Laced moray

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Laced moray
Gymnothorax favagineus 2.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Anguilliformes
Family: Muraenidae
Genus: Gymnothorax
Species: G. favagineus
Binomial name
Gymnothorax favagineus
Bloch & J. G. Schneider, 1801

The laced moray (Gymnothorax favagineus) also known as the leopard moray, tesselate moray or honeycomb moray, is a species of marine fish in the family Muraenidae.

Description[edit]

Gymnothorax favagineus is a large moray which can reach a maximum length of 300 cm, but specimens usually encountered are much smaller.[1] Its serpentine in shape body has a white to yellowish background color dotted with numerous black spots which latter vary in size and shape depending on the individual and on the environment in which the animals live.[2] Therefore, morays living on a reef with clear water will have less black spots than those of a turbid environment.[3] It is from this characteristic color pattern that ensue its vernacular names.

Distribution & habitat[edit]

The laced moray is widespread throughout the Indo-West Pacific area from eastern coast of Africa, Red Sea included, until Papua New Guinea and from south Japan to the Great Barrier Reef.[4][5]

It lives on the outer slopes of coral reefs. During the day, it sits sheltered in crevices between 3.3 and 148.5 feet (1 and 45 meters) deep.[6]

Biology[edit]

The laced moray is carnivorous, it leaves its lair at night to actively hunt its preys along the reef. It feeds mainly on small fish and cephalopods.[7] Large adults are prone to be aggressive in the wild.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lieske, E. and R. Myers, 1994. Collins Pocket Guide. Coral reef fishes. Indo-Pacific & Caribbean including the Red Sea. Haper Collins Publishers, 400 p.
  2. ^ Kuiter, R.H., 1998. Photo guide to fishes of the Maldives. Atoll Editions, Victoria, Australia. 257 p.
  3. ^ Kuiter, R.H. and T. Tonozuka, 2001. Pictorial guide to Indonesian reef fishes. Part 1. Eels- Snappers, Muraenidae - Lutjanidae. Zoonetics, Australia. 302 p.
  4. ^ Fricke, R., 1999. Fishes of the Mascarene Islands (Réunion, Mauritius, Rodriguez): an annotated checklist, with descriptions of new species. Koeltz Scientific Books, Koenigstein, Theses Zoologicae, Vol. 31:759 p.
  5. ^ Lieske, E. and R. Myers, 1994. Collins Pocket Guide. Coral reef fishes. Indo-Pacific & Caribbean including the Red Sea. Haper Collins Publishers, 400 p.
  6. ^ http://doris.ffessm.fr/fiche2.asp?fiche_numero=1567
  7. ^ Sommer, C., W. Schneider and J.-M. Poutiers, 1996. FAO species identification field guide for fishery purposes. The living marine resources of Somalia. FAO, Rome. 376 p.
  8. ^ Lieske, E. and R. Myers, 1994. Collins Pocket Guide. Coral reef fishes. Indo-Pacific & Caribbean including the Red Sea. Haper Collins Publishers, 400 p.

External links[edit]