Lachie Hunter

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Lachie Hunter
Lachie Hunter 2017.4.jpg
Hunter playing for the Western Bulldogs in June 2017
Personal information
Full name Lachlan Hunter
Date of birth (1994-12-13) 13 December 1994 (age 24)
Original team(s) Western Jets (TAC Cup)
Draft No. 49 (Father-son), 2012 National Draft, Western Bulldogs
Height 183 cm (6 ft 0 in)
Weight 82 kg (181 lb)
Position(s) Forward / Midfielder
Club information
Current club Western Bulldogs
Number 7
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
2013– Western Bulldogs 118 (54)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 2018.
Career highlights
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com

Lachlan Hunter (born 13 December 1994) is an Australian rules footballer who represents the Western Bulldogs in the Australian Football League (AFL).

Career[edit]

The son of former Bulldogs player Mark Hunter, he was recruited by the club in the 2012 National Draft, with pick 49 under the father-son rule. He played junior football at St Kevin's College and developed further through the Western Jets TAC Cup program. Hunter also featured in the Under 18 Vic Metro team in 2012.[1]

Hunter made his debut in Round 13, 2013, against Richmond at Etihad Stadium.[2] Since then Hunter had been in and out of the senior side as he continued to strive to seal a consistent spot.

During 2015, Hunter won the Rose–Sutton Medal in the match against Collingwood.[3]

Hunter enjoyed a breakthrough season in 2016, cementing his place in the Bulldogs' senior team and enhancing a reputation as one of the league's most prolific midfielders. He played every game for the Bulldogs and at one stage in the season was considered in the running to make the All-Australian team.[4] While he would eventually miss out, Hunter went on to play a key role in the Bulldogs' remarkable finals campaign that would see them end a 62-year premiership drought. He finished the season as the club's leading disposal getter with 719, averaging nearly 28 disposals per game, ranking him sixth overall in the AFL. Hunter also came second at the club for inside 50s and equal third for goal assists, and was recognized for his achievement when he finished third in the club's best and fairest count, winning the Gary Dempsey Medal.[5]

In round 7, 2018 Hunter captained the Bulldogs in an AFL match, filling in for the injured captain and vice-captain Easton Wood and Marcus Bontempelli.[6] In 2018 Hunter's consistent year saw him win the club's best and fairest award, the Charles Sutton Medal.

Statistics[edit]

Statistics are correct to the end of round 6, 2018[7]
Legend
 G  Goals  B  Behinds  K  Kicks  H  Handballs  D  Disposals  M  Marks  T  Tackles
Season Team No. Games G B K H D M T G B K H D M T
Totals Averages (per game)
2013 Western Bulldogs 26 9 4 4 66 53 119 25 16 0.4 0.4 7.3 5.9 13.2 2.8 1.8
2014 Western Bulldogs 26 14 9 13 126 72 198 51 37 0.6 0.9 9.0 5.1 14.1 3.6 2.6
2015 Western Bulldogs 7 13 3 5 147 140 287 64 28 0.2 0.4 11.3 10.8 22.1 4.9 2.2
2016 Western Bulldogs 7 26 10 14 391 328 719 146 66 0.4 0.5 15.0 12.6 27.7 5.6 2.5
2017 Western Bulldogs 7 22 18 9 302 195 497 116 56 0.8 0.4 13.7 8.9 22.6 5.3 2.5
2018 Western Bulldogs 7 5 3 4 79 60 139 35 10 0.6 0.8 15.8 12.0 27.8 7.0 2.0
Career 89 47 49 1111 848 1959 437 213 0.5 0.6 12.5 9.5 22.0 4.9 2.4

Honours and achievements[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Landsberger, Sam (15 November 2012). "Pick Me: Signed and sealed Western Bulldog Lachie Hunter a devastating goalkicker". Herald Sun.
  2. ^ "Top Eagles back for Hawks clash". Sportal. 20 June 2013. Archived from the original on 5 September 2013. Retrieved 6 September 2013.
  3. ^ "GAME DAY: Western Bulldogs v Collingwood at Etihad Stadium". 3AW. 26 July 2015.
  4. ^ Waterworth, Ben. "Lachie Hunter having career-best AFL season in 2016, opposition coaches opt not to tag him". Fox Sports.
  5. ^ Bowen, Nick (23 January 2017). "Big Dogs impress early". westernbulldogs.com.au.
  6. ^ Black, Sarah (6 May 2018). "Bulldogs toss the coin to toss the coin". AFL Media. Telstra Media. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  7. ^ "Lachie Hunter". AFL Tables. Retrieved 26 May 2016.

External links[edit]